Birth of a Chefs knife - Carter Cutlery Journeyman Program

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Joined Nov 15, 2012
Good for you.  I'm reminded that I haven't touched real machine tools in years now, not that it has anything to do with forging.

Can't say I'll ever get around to it, so don't be shy about beating me to it Full Sack, but one of these days I'd like to do something in Wootz steel.  A 2000+ year old process for producing crucible grade steel, wasn't surpassed until the late in the 18th century.  it is also the proper steel to refer to when using the term Damascus, as nothing like the layered steel referred to today was ever produced in ancient Damascus.

Because of the carbide size and distribution you can create interesting patterns with it.  Rick Furrer gives classes where you make a blob of the stuff then forge it, very reasonable price.  Saw one of his knives that had a very distinct fern stalk running the length, impressive.


http://doorcountyforgeworks.com/styled-12/index.html
 
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Joined Oct 19, 2014
Good for you.  I'm reminded that I haven't touched real machine tools in years now, not that it has anything to do with forging.

Can't say I'll ever get around to it, so don't be shy about beating me to it Full Sack, but one of these days I'd like to do something in Wootz steel.  A 2000+ year old process for producing crucible grade steel, wasn't surpassed until the late in the 18th century.  it is also the proper steel to refer to when using the term Damascus, as nothing like the layered steel referred to today was ever produced in ancient Damascus.

Because of the carbide size and distribution you can create interesting patterns with it.  Rick Furrer gives classes where you make a blob of the stuff then forge it, very reasonable price.  Saw one of his knives that had a very distinct fern stalk running the length, impressive.


http://doorcountyforgeworks.com/styled-12/index.html

The video was fascinating. Thanks Rick.
I'd be interested to know how the Wootz steel performs, used as a chefs knife. Making a knife from an ingot, rather than from bar steel, is a lot more work: lots of hammering. Hard for me because I'm making my knives with a hammer and anvil, can't find a decent power hammer.
I am not to the stage where I'm comfortable working with the Damascus process. For now, I'm staying with plain Hitachi white #1.
 
2,865
236
Joined Nov 15, 2012
Because of the relatively slow cooling and solidification process wootz carbides are kinda large compared to modern crucible steels, so produces a naturally toothy edge.  Yeh, because of the ingots dendritic structure you have to go through a lot of heats and pounding to make it workable.  Its main appeal to me is that its making is such an elegant process and amazingly inspired creation for ancient metal workers to have come up with, along with its crucible-steel strength and attributes that uniquely lend to the artistic.
 
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