BGE. Pork Shoulder

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by takingstock, Oct 30, 2013.

  1. takingstock

    takingstock

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    I'm cooking a 9 pound pork Butt on my Big Green Egg @225° as I type this.

    Do I need to turn it at all?  I have the fat side up…?

    Any opinions on done-ness?  195° internal sound good?

    THX
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2013
  2. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    No particular reason to turn it. 195 is the classic temp to shoot for, but I usually pull it before then as at my elevation a full 195 can start to dry out again. 
     
  3. takingstock

    takingstock

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    do you do any moping or just leave alone?

    + I brined it.  Have you done this or does not make a difference?
     
  4. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    This is mostly my opinion and preference. Good barbecue can be had from multiple paths, not just mine.

    I've brined a few times but have moved away from it in most cases. Preference issue and convenience mostly. 

    Mopping, I don't see the big benefit of most mops. It doesn't really penetrate appreciably but can help with the bark if that's something you think needs improving. Fat and acid are what i think helps there the most.  Mopping can also rob a lot of heat.   i tend to foil my pork shoulder after 5 or so hours in the smoke as they don't really absorb much more smoke at that point. I'll unfoil for the last hour or so to bring the bark back to proper texture.   

    I like to save the juices that accumulate in the foil, defat, boil them down and return them to the meat after pulling. I've never seen anyone else do it, but I think it really returns flavor and succulence to the pulled pork.  or use in a barbecue sauce.
     
  5. takingstock

    takingstock

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    Thanks for the input!   I also save the juice/defat/reduce/putback.
     
  6. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    I use a Weber Smokey Mountain  smoker and not big deal.  My butts are given a rub and never brined.  But note that on BBQ Pittmasters tv show they flavor/brine inject their pork.  Your choice.

    And I always mop at some point in the cooking.

    Navigate around this website for some recipes, not for the type of smoker but for the recipes (and the forum) and you can clearly see that butt preparation is all over the place as it were.

    And you can go here for forums for your BGE, too.

    And WELCOME!
     
  7. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Agreed! Many afficionados follow this same procedure.

    Personally I'm moving away from rubs and remaining with merely S&P.   Then I follow your listed procedure.
     
  8. maryb

    maryb

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    No brine, heavy application of rub. I start fat side down and flip once. When the blade bone is loose it is ready to pull, 195 is a ballpark but sometimes not high enough.
     
  9. takingstock

    takingstock

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    How important is the cool down?

    Remove /wrap /insulate…cool 1+ hours….pros/cons.

    Im a little behind schedule.
     
  10. burntmitts82

    burntmitts82

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    I would imagine you don't want to cool it too fast because that would interrupt the carryover and if you cut into it too soon you'll lose a lot of the juices. If you let it rest/cool those juices will get reabsorbed back into the meat making for a more tender fall off the bone product. Pork shoulder can get dry and stringy pretty easily.
     
  11. takingstock

    takingstock

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    Thanks I've only done these a few times….good stuff but heavy.
     
  12. takingstock

    takingstock

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    Fini!
     
    phatch likes this.
  13. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    DO NOT SLICE AT THIS TIME, WHEN THE MEAT IS REMOVED FROM THE COOKER!  Wrap the meat in two pieces of foil 90 degrees from one another, in the shape of a tee and allow to rest, covered, for an hour prior to slicing.  At this very moment the juices have all migrated toward the surface of the meat and slicing at this time will allow the dam to burst and the juices to leak out, resulting in dry meat.  Allowing the meat to rest for an hour, covered, will cause the juices to migrate toward the center of the butt resulting in juicier meat once sliced and pulled.

    And slice parallel to the grain.  Then pull apart.  That's a tip I learned on BBQ Pittmasters.

    Again please consult the recipes at the virtual weber bullet website.  Some of them will save you some heartache.

    BUTT PREPARATION and SLOW COOKING/SMOKING

    Best,

    -T

    PS:   upper case was added for emphasis and I'm not yelling.  I just want you to avoid slicing it prematurely thus ruining that cut of meat you worked so hard for.
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2013
  14. teamfat

    teamfat

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    As PHatch says, there are multiple paths.  Ask half a dozen pitmasters how to cook a *perfect* butt you'll get half a dozen different answers.  Ask again after a couple more rounds of beer and you'll get a new set of answers.

    Shoulder should have enough fat in it that brining isn't necessary.  I've only tried it once and didn't notice any difference, which is hardly conclusive research.  I've done a dry rub after a mustard slather and without, again, not that much different.  Most rub recipes are heavy on salt and sugar, the 8:3:1:1 ratio, as I recall.  Mine is different.

    In theory once the shoulder gets through the plateau stage it is ready to pull, but in practice 195 - 200 is better.  About halfway into the smoke I splash on some of my HoosierQ Pig Sauce, which is basically my rub mixed in water and vinegar, then again about an hour before estimated done time.  I think it helps with the final flavor of the bark.

    But pretty much every time I've done it I've ended up with a big pile of tasty eats.

    mjb.
     
  15. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Like many food afficionados out there, I'm mostly concerned with allowing the meat to set - covered - prior to slicing.  Season it anyway you want.
     
  16. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    I've come to a dual layer mustard slather technique I like for building bark on pork shoulder. A light layer of rub, a light brushing of mustard, then more rub. I think that makes a better bark than a slather and rub. 

    In general, I like the mustard slather on pork. A mayo slather can help with the skin on  a smoked bird. Only help, not really solve the problem of slow smoked chicken skin.
     
  17. burntmitts82

    burntmitts82

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    looks good!
     
  18. teamfat

    teamfat

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    Oh  dear, look at all that black crusty stuff - I better come over and clean that all up for you.

    mjb.
     
  19. takingstock

    takingstock

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    Thanks for all the great input. It was a success! We had two other couples over and one of the wives had more of the butt then all of us combined. :eek:

    Little curious about the "slicing". Typically it is so soft that I just us tongs and pull off chunks to plate. Is it possible to slice?

    QUESTION- I cooked with the fat on top and there was an excellent crust but its kinda connected to the fat layer. Would it not be better to have the crust touching the leaner side?

    My idea was (over thinking here) to cook using some kind of a stand so it rests on its smaller end then invert at the half way mark....this would put more crust all over.
     
  20. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Sounds fine to me.