Best way to serve quiche in a cafe

1
0
Joined Jun 8, 2021
Hello all, I wanted some professional advice on serving individual baked quiches in a cafe. I created these 12cm diameter “mini” quiches for the four cafes to sell. Obviously this must function like a catering service so I bake in large amounts and then they are taken by our team to each cafe. However there is a complaint that they fall apart. I’m not sure if it’s a problem with the quiche itself, because the dough is really good classic pie dough. It’s not a street food so of course it falls apart when eating as a whole piece.
My questions are:
1. Is there something I can do to have them be more sturdy (something with the dough, or maybe make them smaller)
2. Should we just explain to the guests that it’s a sit down food
3. They have me baking in advance so they sit for a couple days sometimes, which I don’t like. Should I just explain to management that they need to be served and baked fresh daily?

any tips would be appreciated
 
1,318
847
Joined Mar 1, 2017
Welcome to CT. :)

Here are your answers:

1. Yes. Bake the crusts first, let them cool and then add the custard and bake again. Low temp is a must here, especially since the quiche is so small. Make sure there's some "jiggle" left in the custard when baking is complete. Small quiches like that are going to present their own set of issues so, there's going to be some trial and error involved.

2. Yes. But, if the guests want to eat it on the go anyway, so be it. As long as they're buying it, who cares?

3. YES! YES! YES! Quiche is not a food anyone wants hanging out on the cooler. It sweats, the texture degrades, the filling settles and everything else. These should always be made fresh daily.

Good luck. :)
 

chefpeon

Kitchen Dork
808
221
Joined Jun 15, 2006
At first, I thought how in the world can a 4 inch quiche fall apart? Then after reading sgsvirgil sgsvirgil 's response, I figured that you must be pouring the quiche filling into a raw shell before baking them. It doesn't take very long to bake a quiche that small, and the filling is finished baking WAY before the crust is done. So I think you've basically got a raw crust that falls apart when handled.

In the grand scope of things, quiche has a pretty good shelf life and it's something that's safe to bake in advance. But also, like every other bakery item, it's just not as good as fresh. Fortunately, you can easily streamline production so it doesn't take that much extra time to bake them daily. Blind bake/par bake a bunch of shells in advance and store them in the freezer. Pull them out as needed, fill them with various ingredients (ham, cheese, peppers, spinach, bacon, etc) then mix up your quiche batter and pour over the ingredients in the shells. Pop 'em in the oven to bake off daily. When done properly, 4 inch quiches can easily be an item that you don't have to eat with a knife and fork.
 
4,091
922
Joined Dec 18, 2010
If “classic pie dough” is the American classic, consider using a European tart pastry that includes an egg. It is sturdier and better suited for quiche.
 

chefpeon

Kitchen Dork
808
221
Joined Jun 15, 2006
If “classic pie dough” is the American classic, consider using a European tart pastry that includes an egg. It is sturdier and better suited for quiche.
This is true. But either one should be par-baked ahead of time.
 
193
44
Joined Dec 29, 2019
12cm? whats that, 7 feet ? i don't do decimal.

Let me guess, you remove them from the mold before delivery? Thats a problem.
Find a suitable individual foil mold, bake it in that and deliver in the disposable mold.
I wouldn't blind bake, its an extra unneeded step.

These are 11 cents ea.
 
193
44
Joined Dec 29, 2019
If “classic pie dough” is the American classic, consider using a European tart pastry that includes an egg. It is sturdier and better suited for quiche.
yeh, typical pie dough can (should) be very tender, not suitable for a pie out of the mold.
i do it but always leave the pie in the foil mold.
and no need to blind bake.
like this. Its just the recipe from the can of crisco,
5 1/2 of fat, 8 oz cake flour, 3 oz cold tap water, spoonful salt.

 
193
44
Joined Dec 29, 2019
Hello all, I wanted some professional advice on serving individual baked quiches in a cafe. I created these 12cm diameter “mini” quiches for the four cafes to sell. Obviously this must function like a catering service so I bake in large amounts and then they are taken by our team to each cafe. However there is a complaint that they fall apart. I’m not sure if it’s a problem with the quiche itself, because the dough is really good classic pie dough. It’s not a street food so of course it falls apart when eating as a whole piece.
My questions are:
1. Is there something I can do to have them be more sturdy (something with the dough, or maybe make them smaller)
2. Should we just explain to the guests that it’s a sit down food
3. They have me baking in advance so they sit for a couple days sometimes, which I don’t like. Should I just explain to management that they need to be served and baked fresh daily?

any tips would be appreciated

In the better places in France they're made with puff dough, it doesn't fall apart out of the mold.
If you don't/can't go that route, try a richer short dough. not made with water, it uses egg and is easier to handle, not rubber if over mixed.
1 lb butter.
20 oz all purpose or weak bread flour.
make a dry rub and add 2 eggs, mix to a putty texture, takes about 5 seconds in the machine.
If you chill the dough I'd use margarine, trying to roll chilled butter dough is a pain.
I use this dough for tomato tart but its ok for small quiche.

 
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