Best Way to Oven Season a Wok

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by orihara, Jul 15, 2014.

  1. orihara

    orihara

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    How long, what rack, and at what temperature is best for seasoning a carbon steel wok in the oven? I'm really scared of creating a burnt, sticky layer of oil on the surface, which happened to my old wok.
    Thanks
     
  2. luc_h

    luc_h

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    Here's an excellent reference:

    http://sherylcanter.com/wordpress/2010/01/a-science-based-technique-for-seasoning-cast-iron/

    Key points:

    use flax seed oil

    450 to 500F

    2 to 3 hours

    apply in a thin layer: I used a paper towel that I dip in oil and rub the whole surface while it's hot.

    the seasoned layer is complete when the pan appears dry (no streaks with little or no droplets)

    You can build up seasoning with consecutive application of complete cycles.

    Luc H.
     
  3. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    Unscrew wood or plastic handles if it has any. Flaxseed oil is ideal, but others will work too.
     
  4. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Rubbed peanut oil on both sides of my wok and placed into a 450F oven for three hours.  Repeat once.
     
  5. ordo

    ordo

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    I have a collection of woks and a lot of carbon steel pans. I never seasoned them in an oven, but a stove.I do not know a Chinese cook that would season a wok in the oven.
     
  6. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    The oven is not common in traditional Chinese seasoning of woks. I think it's an offshoot of US cast iron tricks. The oven with its even heat seasons all surfaces at once. You set it and forget it which has its appeal.

    The stove technique works too of course.