Best way to move out older table sitters?

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They were slow Sat, so he had one last table. As he told it, two women came in, small plates and BS. They were getting ready to leave, so was he. Then the hubbies come in and order a round of drinks and sit for another hour. $15 for two hours.
That's only one side of the story. What about that Saturday when things got real busy, several tables ordering round of drinks after round of drinks? $60 for two hours?

Most jobs without a fixed hourly wage have up and down periods, and some risk factor is involved. It's your friend's choice to take a job without a fixed hourly wage. If he wants to rip the benefits of those busy Saturdays when customers are tipping generously, he's got to suffer those slow Saturdays when spouses or friends show up, join a party and sit down for an hour without ordering anything.

Surely the customers can't be held responsible for the fact that the restaurant is having a slow Saturday or that they weren't able to fill or keep a single other table at the end of that specific night.

On the other hand if every day is slow and no one tips generously, and your friend is consistently getting paid $15 for two hours, then obviously he should reconsider his position or career choice.
 
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BTW, although this thread is quite obviously bigoted against the elderly, a protected group in the US, I find the younger generation just as bad in this regard. And some people of specific ethnic orientations. Lots of people can be self-centered and feel privileged above all others... not just the older generations.
 
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BTW, although this thread is quite obviously bigoted against the elderly, a protected group in the US, I find the younger generation just as bad in this regard. And some people of specific ethnic orientations. Lots of people can be self-centered and feel privileged above all others... not just the older generations.
I don't think the OP meant it to be that way, just an observation. I tried to point out what you are saying by showing that all people can be guilty of squatting if you give them the opportunity.
 
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Definitely interesting to see how much waiters hate their clientele. This wouldn’t be such a big deal if people weren’t working for mere tips and we’re actually earning a living wage. Feeling rushed is a huge pet peeve of mine. I’m out, in not at work, I’m spending money, and I don’t want to feel like I owe my table to your next customer. It’s especially frustrating when I’m given my check without asking for it and while I’m still eating. Love it how they say “whenever you’re ready” too.
brianshaw brianshaw ladies wouldn’t need an extra chair for their picket book of restaurants didn’t have round backed chairs that nothing can be draped on it. Seriously though, where am I to put my purse I’d i can’t hang it on a chair?
 
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Maybe they should come back with the Blue Plate Special between 3:30-5:00 or 4-6 PM. I never see lines at restaurants at 4PM. There is not a nice way of telling someone it's time to give up their table. People go out to relax and spend time with the friends they bring with them. That being said, I have noticed the tables by the kitchen door have always turned over quickly. Just Sayin'.....ChefBillyB
 
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I’m out, in not at work, I’m spending money, and I don’t want to feel like I owe my table to your next customer. It’s especially frustrating when I’m given my check without asking for it and while I’m still eating. Love it how they say “whenever you’re ready” too.
It works both ways. There's no excuse for rushing customers through their meals. That would justify a smaller tip for the server IMO. However, customers that finish their meals then take up space for an unreasonable amount of time while they talk, etc. are wrong and inconsiderate.
 
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I think French Fries already mentioned it, it is very much depending on the country your are in and differs per restaurant.
In the Netherlands, either you got the table for the evening, or there are 2 shifts and you get told when booking.
Here in Zambia, it is 1 seating per table per evening. At the most, they may ask you to move to the bar, or wait at the bar till a table comes free.

I run a lodge and at times we have some people hanging around, chatting, talking and just having 1 beer an hour. We generally walk up to them and ask if we can leave them with a cool box of beers. Never a problem, but then, they are sleeping at our place so we can easily sort their bill in the morning
 
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It works both ways. There's no excuse for rushing customers through their meals. That would justify a smaller tip for the server IMO. However, customers that finish their meals then take up space for an unreasonable amount of time while they talk, etc. are wrong and inconsiderate.
I don’t think so at all. The very best part of the meal is at the end when everyone is done, a little tipsy, and the conversation is at its finest. That is really missing here in America. Mostly I’ve spent time in Greece but in all the cities I’ve visited in Europe I never felt pressure to leave a restaurant.
 
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I don’t think so at all. The very best part of the meal is at the end when everyone is done, a little tipsy, and the conversation is at its finest. That is really missing here in America. Mostly I’ve spent time in Greece but in all the cities I’ve visited in Europe I never felt pressure to leave a restaurant.
Well, that's the difference between the US and Europe I guess. I think part of the problem is in America it's harder to turn a profit so you have to turn over those tables.
 
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Well, if you fill your dining room only once a night and serve only one meal per person something has to be vastly different for you to make a profit off that.
 

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