Best method for roasting poblanos?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by jamaster14, May 26, 2013.

  1. jamaster14

    jamaster14

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    Was going to roast some poblanos today... i only have the oven to use.  what would be my best bet, i was going to:

    -brush with olive oil

    -season

    - place on sheet pan in middle tack under broil on high

    - flip once it blisters

    - transfer to bowl cover with plastic then peel

    any suggestions?  really trying to avoid any bitter/burnt taste as some of this will be going in a soup.
     
  2. french fries

    french fries

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    FWIW:

    I don't brush with oil

    I don't season

    I don't use a broiler

    Just put then in a hot oven (400F) until you see some blistering, flip, blister again, transfer to bowl and cover (why waste plastic? Just put a plate on top of your bowl). 
     
  3. jamaster14

    jamaster14

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    Thanks!  i'll try your method.

    center rack/top rack preference?
     
  4. durangojo

    durangojo

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    If you have a gas stove you can also roast them over your burner...sweat, then peel and carry on with your recipe....
    Just curious, do you add potatoes to your roasted poblano soup? Really gives it that extra
    oomphy-ness

    joey
     
  5. french fries

    french fries

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    Center rack in the oven. In the summer I just put roast them on my gas grill, outdoors. It's almost somewhere in between the oven method and Joey's method: the peppers are directly over the flame but the flames are not touching their skins, so the charring is a little slower than if you roasted them over your burners. But you can do many at a time!
     
  6. Iceman

    Iceman

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    OK.   You say "... only have the oven to use.".   So I'm guessing that means no stovetop?   If so, I'm agreeing w/ FF, but I'd put them on a plate and cover w/ the bowl.   Save and use all the steam possible.   However, if you do have a stovetop, then put them right on the burner grates and flip them around when they get charred.   I throw them in the plastic bag they came in for steaming.    
     
  7. chicagoterry

    chicagoterry

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    I do mine under a broiler all the time. Works fine, but I like a bit of char in the flavor and it sounds like you may be trying to avoid that. No oil. Then sweat them in a bowl with a plate on top.
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2013
  8. durangojo

    durangojo

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    What's the big deal with the char if you're going to peel them anyway?....to me the charing is where the flavor comes from.......unless you totally incinerate them which is hard to do, everything just gets peeled away. I so love the smell of roasting peppers.....what an intoxicating aroma. I agree with FF that grilling peppers on an outdoor grill is mucho mas mejor when doing a 'batch' and is my preferred way. i cook everything i can on the grill as often as i can as I don't think you can beat the flavor, the ease and the ambience that grilling brings to the table. an added bonus is less pots and pans to clean....I like that! ;)

    joey
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2013
  9. soul vole

    soul vole

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    I use a gas burner with a fairly high flame to char them as quickly as possible. Char them too slowly and the flesh overcooks. Ten minutes in plastic and peel. Do not peel under running water as that just washes flavor down the drain.

    It's perhaps possible to char them too quickly. I once had a chile en nogada where they must have used a blow torch. The flesh was nearly raw, which gave it a nice crunch but lacked the roasty flavor.

    FWIW, Diana Kennedy recommends brushing with oil when using a broiler, and not to use a hot oven as that again overcooks the flesh.
     

    ETA: I wouldn't worry about bitterness. I tend to almost completely blacken the skin and they come out great. I once made a roasted habanero salsa where I left them over the flame too long -- some were completely carbonized in spots. I made the salsa anyway and to my surprise it was delicious.
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2013