Best Deep Fryer For Home Use???

phatch

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Yes, the single burner induction hobs put more heat into the pan than the home gas stoves do. The key is efficiency. Gas stoves have more total BTUs than the wall unit induction. But the induction hobs surpass the gas via efficiency. Gas stoves are about 33% efficient, induction about 85%. 1800 W induction is 6141 BTU, home gas stoves 13000 BTU. But when you look at the heat that goes into the pan, gas is about 4300 BTU and induction about 5200 BTU. 
 
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phatch

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Depends how old it is. 5-7 years old, it will probably work. Older, probably not. Stick a magnet on the bottom. If it sticks, it will work. If it doesn't stick, it won't. 

There is technology in the pipeline that induces eddy currents in all metals so they work on induction, even if not ferrous. 
 
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Wow, I realize this is an old thread, but how embarrassing. I came here after a search for "commercial deep fryer for home use" led me here. My first thought was, cool, a website for chefs, this should give me some good advice on a nice deep fryer for home use, since so far my search isn't providing a lot of good options. Then I get this....... So the best answers from the "chefs" are , a deep skillet and a wok. Then a long argument about induction cook tops, like as if most people have an induction cook top. First off, a wok is a horrible choice for the occasional deep fryer at home.

Yeah the Chinese were using woks long before we had deep fryers, but people were also using horses to get around long before we had automobiles. I mean technically I could go outside and deep fry over a camp fire in an empty paint can too, but I'm not gonna. People looking a deep fryer want to be able to control the temperature and ensure at least 350 degrees, since that is a key element in quality deep fried food, and want something that can quickly get back to at least that temp after food is introduced. That means they need to be able to determine the temp, and have something with enough power to get the oil to that temp without going way over and burning their house down.

Which brings us back to why a wok is a HORRIBLE choice for home use. You cant easily determine or control the temperature, and once you are done you have a giant bowl of oil to deal with. Ever notice an easy pour spout on a wok? No? So what kinds of fun do you think is going to happen trying to get all of that oil out of the wok after your one meal? Not to mention the fact that you had to deep fry in a giant open bowl to begin with. Oil will be getting EVERYWHERE, and you can only hope and pray you don't get the oil too hot, or have some kid or accident prone adult tip the thing over or catch it on fire when your phone rings and you don't understand how easily it is to catch oil on fire. With that said, I won't even bother mentioning the skillet method. Yes you can do shallow frying in a pan, and I've seen my mother fry chicken like that 100s of times, but its not deep frying, and it doesn't work well for things like fries, corn dogs, mozzarella, etc. Heck it doesn't even do chicken all that well. If I remember correctly my mothers fried chicken was never crispy. In short, if you are reading this and decide to use a wok, PLEASE be super super careful, and be prepared for a very messy kitchen afterward. DO NOT leave the Wok unattended and keep all children far away from the kitchen. It WILL splatter hot oil every where, so if you are using a gas stove with an open flame then be aware that if you have the oil too hot it will splatter heavily when you introduce food to it, or if you drip some of that oil down the sides and it rolls down to that flame, you are going to start a fire. I suggest reading up on how to put out an oil fire before trying this method. I have one horror story of my own that I got extremely lucky on. I was using a large pot to cook some fries. My phone rang and in a matter of a couple of minutes there was an open flame above the pot because the oil got too hot. I grabbed the first thing near me which was a pot in the sink with water. For those of you who know what water does to an oil fire, you can only imagine. The entire kitchen was singed in flame for a brief second, but for some strange reason it burned itself out almost immediately. I got lucky. It still destroyed the stove fan and overhang and most of the paint on the ceiling which was covered in black smoke. 

With all of that said, let me provide what I have found so far in my own research. In short, there aren't any really good options for deep fryers at home. I can only assume that companies are worried about liability if they sell something for home use that has the power to heat oil to the temps needed to fry well, because there are very limited options. So far as of this date the best thing I could find is the Waring Pro DF280, but as of 12/12/2016 it is discontinued and I'm not sure why. It has the highest wattage at 1800 watts and 3 different size baskets. It does have a LOT of bad reviews, but it also has a LOT of good ones. Several different sites list it as the No. 1 pick, but it sounds like you will have to get lucky to find a good one that will last more than a couple of months. Even the good ones claim varying success in getting the temp over 350 and staying there, but as of now its the best option as long as you can get one before the stock runs out. 

There are some other options for smaller commercial grade deep fryers out there, but smaller still means at least 2 feet of counter top space, and like 8 gallons of oil, but for those who have large kitchens it might be doable as they do have covers when not in use. Still, you are talking about a minimum of $250 dollars worth of investment. I suppose we are going to try and go with the Waring and hope for the best until we build our forever home and have the kitchen space for a real deep fryer. 
 
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Wow!  That was a long irrelevant post on an old thread.  Did you ever take a chemistry class and have to control the temperature of a burner?  It's actually pretty easy.  Once you get your oil to the temp you want, you just turn your burner down a bit.

The problems you have as a home cook are 

1) deep frying uses a lot of oil

2) the oil gets dirty and smelly and you can't re-use it

Woks solve all of this.   Because of the shape, I can deep fry in 2 cups of oil.   I can give it a few seconds between batches and the temp comes right  back up.  The oil stays a lot cleaner and it is easier to strain.  The large surface area at the top is great for deep frying.  If you fry things in batter, they don't get stuck to a fry basket.  You're not filling oil to the top obviously.  There is a large amount of unused wok.  This will reduce splatter considerably.  Get a large metal ladle and a spider and you are good to go.  Oh and cleaning!  Cleaning a wok is a lot faster than cleaning one of those electric deep fryers.

So... what's your problem with woks again?
 
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I don't have a problem with Woks, I just have a problem telling average home cooks to use a wok to deep fry in when they come here asking for advice on a good deep fryer. Obviously they are looking for a dedicated deep frying apparatus, not some other list of tools that they most likely do not have, OR do not have the skills to use properly. While your post was MUCH more informative than the prior posts about Woks, it still doesn't solve the inherent dangers of a typical at home cook deep frying in it, which is why my post is hardly irrelevant. . I at least applaud you for outlining some of the ways a wok CAN be beneficial though, as it does address some of the issues people will also have with a dedicated deep fryer.

Many new age deep fryers have a spout to easily release the oil, and since you are only doing this periodically, the extra cleaning doesn't have to be done very often. Deep fryers also have an automatic shut off when the oil gets too hot. My point is, I don't think you should be promoting Wok deep frying without going in to the pro's and cons and how to's of cooking in a Wok, especially when the question wasn't, "what can I use to deep fry in other than a deep fryer". Just saying use a Wok, leaves a lot of unanswered questions that many will learn the hard way, like how to insert food in to a wok full of hot oil, how much oil to use, how to ensure your oil is at a proper temperature and stays that way, and how to remove the oil safely and effectively to use it again later. All of these things are NOT issues you will have with a deep fryer, because they are all addressed. These are also issues that will create safety issues when using a wok. 

For anyone attempting to use a Wok to deep fry in, which CAN be a very effective method, I suggest doing your homework first. This link is very informative 

http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2010/06/shrimp-tempura-with-creamy-spicy-yuzu-sauce-recipe.html
 
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1. You can absolutely get crispy chicken shallow frying. Your mother was more than likely putting in too much chicken and lowering the temp to below 300 when you should be frying it at 350-375

2. Don't ever leave hot oil unattended, even if the phone rings. If it's important they'll call back

3. There are no good home deep frying units. They just don't exist as far as I've seen. I have heard good things about pressure fryers but never seen one in operation.

4. The best home fryer is a large dutch oven filled 1/3 of the way up with oil.
 
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Larry,

     Welcome to cheftalk.

"Many new age deep fryers have a spout to easily release the oil, and since you are only doing this periodically, the extra cleaning doesn't have to be done very often"  You may be surprised when you start using a deep fryer.  The oil after it has been heated tends to break down faster and leaving it in the fryer without filtering.  The fryer also needs to be cleaned of residue or you get a bad tasting mess in the fryer.  If not heating the oil every day it should be stored in the refrigerator. The last time I was in charge of a fry station we filtered and cleaned every night.
 
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I agree, there are no good home deep frying units. Most people are not aware of the proper temperatures to deep fry in though, or have a way to test the temps, or know how to effectively maintain a good frying temp in a pan. 
 
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Good point, and is something most home cooks do not realize. A deep fryer tends to make it easy to just leave the oil in it until you use it again, because most have no idea what to do with all of that oil. Although in my search I did notice that some deep fryers also address this issue by having built in filters. The problem seems to be that they do not always work that well. I can guarantee that a very small percentage of people are storing their used oil in their fridge at home, or are filtering their oil after each use unless they have a deep fryer that does it for them. I do understand that this would be essential in a restaurant. 
 
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Stick around this site and you will find most do know proper temperatures.  They also go around with a thermapen  in their pockets.  Many like me also have a laser thermometer to check surface temps of food and equipment.  I use a dutch oven at home and have the lid handy as a safety precaution.  
 
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I do plan to stick around. I love talking food. I recently found out about thermapens and really want one. What really brought me here was my search for a quality deep fryer for home use, but that idea was spawned from a desire to make good wings at home. We generally go to our local Wingstop, but we moved and now the closest one is about a 40 minute drive. Then we tried out some wings in the frozen food section of our local grocer, only to have to dump the little fatsickles they call wings in the garbage. Ironically I may end up going to the wok as what I am looking for doesn't seem to exist without taking up a large section of my already too small counter space. 
 
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Thermapen is your first defense... Don't let the oil temp go over the smoke point cause it tastes bad, let alone the flash point where it would ignite.

2nd line defense put a lid on it if it is up in flames

3rd - fire extinguisher. I can't believe I didn't have one before this year. I did a few offsite events on my own and I was forced to get one along with servsafe, gloves, etc. Anyway I'm glad I have it because the fact is I fry and grill on the porch year round and stuff can happen; better to have it and not need it than the other way
 

nicko

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This is one I bought a year ago: 
[product="27146"]Waring Pro Df280 Professional Deep Fryer Brushed Stainless  [/product]
Decent price but the first unit I received had issues with the temperature not getting high enough so I requested a replacement. This is ok but honestly I prefer using my dutch oven:
[product="7304"]Mario Batali 4 Quart Essential Pot Chianti  [/product]
 
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Yup, that is the one that is rated the best on all of the websites I have checked, but it is now discontinued. You can still buy them, but that will only last until their stock runs out. I've seen mixed reviews about it, and am a little hesitant based on some of the bad reviews. 
 
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So I tried to Wok method today. I was able to cook some of the best chicken wings I have ever had, but I encountered some of the issues I was expecting by trying to deep fry outside of a traditional dedicated deep fryer. First off, it created a HUGE mess. I can only do 8-10 wings at a time, which 8 wings is probably the magic number, which means It takes me about 20-30 mins depending on the amount of wings. The temperature was a little difficult to manage but not too bad. My first batch the oil was approaching 380 when I put the wings in and it dropped quickly to near 300, but I finally got it back up and the next batch I was prepared for the huge drop and managed it a little better. My biggest complaint is the mess and the amount of wings I can do at one time, considering I would still have to do fries and maybe some jalapeno poppers, so keeping all the food at a good temperature until I got it all done would be the next challenge, but that may be an issue anyway depending on how big of a deep fryer I could get for home use. All in all it wasn't bad, and once I get all the splattered oil off of my stove, walls and my new $2100 set of kitchen knives, I might feel a little better about it. 
 
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