Best Cut of Roast Beef for Thinly Sliced Warm Roast Beef Sandwiches?

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Joined Nov 7, 2017
I'm attempting to build up my Thursday bar business by serving a nice quality, warm, rare roast beef sandwicheson a Miami Onion Roll at a discounted price. I've seen this done back in the New England area with much success. I'm not sure what cut of beef to use. I'd like to thinly slice this and serve it warm on a buttered and toasted onion roll.

Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Thanks in advance.
 
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I always use Top Round as long as it's sliced thin. The top round has good flavor for sandwiches. For some ideas looks at the Beef on weck in New York state. The other one would be Defontes in NYC. These are melt on your mouth sandwiches. I just wanted to give you a visual of what these sandwiches look like.
 

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Top round is the typical choice, thinly sliced, plenty of it. A bit of horseradish mayo sauce on top. There was a local chain here years ago called Nebas that served those on a round sesame seed bun with tater tots. They went out of business but only because of partnership issues. The sandwiches were delicious and very popular.
If memory serves me correctly, back in the day they kept the meat warm under a heat lamp and sliced it to order or nearly so. Then warm on the bun with a side of au jus. Don't think the current regulations would allow that process now but serving them warm was part of the experience. A current local chain does a similar sandwich by dipping the meat in warm jus before serving, but the meat is cooked and refrigerated ahead of time now as per current regulations.
I remember the top round had some seasoning on the outside but nothing too special or exotic. I think kosher salt and pepper would be close.
 
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Top round as the others have said. I used to roast off two a week for cold sandwiches and French dips on my food truck. Roasted whole straight out of the bag, salt, pepper, granulated onion and garlic, lots of it.
I roasted at 350 and pulled at 110, let it cool then refrigerate overnight.
Quarter and trim, slice thin against the grain.
 

kuan

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You can even buy it already roasted, not that I suggest you do, but in case...
 
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To meet a good price point the top round as mentioned. If you can boost the price a sirloin roast has more flavor. I always use the sirloin roasts I get with my quarter of beef to make sandwiches. Slow smoke it with a good salt/pepper/onion & garlic powder crust. Slice really thin then pile on a buttered and toasted bun. Au jus on the side along with horseradish of some form(in cream, mayo, plain, etc), optional would be a good coarse grain brown mustard with some bite...
 
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hey Guys,

Thanks for the responses I think you all understand what I'm looking for here. I was thinking a Top
Round and glad you all agreed. I like to season it with Garlic, onion powders, black pepper, small amount of rosemary and some thyme. My secret (I think) is to also to use fennel seed. It gives it a wonderful aroma and most people don't know what it is. I'm sure a foodie wouldn't be fooled though. Like a million years ago (lol) I worked for a caterer that was know for a killer prime rib. Everyone in the area (Massachusetts) used to comment about how unique his prime was. At the time I was working the front of the house so paid no attention but many years later his sister told me he used to use pickling spice to season the beef. As soon as she said it, and now that I was a chef, it all seemed so clear. I've never tried it myself but keep telling myself that I will someday. I imagine he must have ground it up cause I never remember any seeds or woody bay leaves in my mouth.

Again, thanks for your help and as a newbie here I certainly appreciate it.

Bert
Tamarack Cafe & Tavern
Roll, AZ
 
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Also keep in mind that lets say a raw price is $3.50 lb, finished, trimmed cost will be at about $5 lb.
 
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