Beer Hot Sauce

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Joined Feb 20, 2018
Hey everyone, new to this forum. Im a chef who has experience making hot sauce and cooking/ using beer (specifically craft beer) in cooking.

I have recently been making hot sauce by fermenting chili peppers and other ingredients with a brine that includes beer. I have to say I have had some amazing results. I add other ingredients such as; garlic, carrot, onion, sweet peppers,much more as well as spices, sugar, salt, and sometimes fruits. To date I have made 8 hot sauces and each one is getting better and better.

The reason I post this is because there seems to be a lack of information out there about beer hot sauces. Not many recipes on google, no videos on youtube, its just not out there. Maybe its just me who loves it but if anyone else has ever done it too/ wants to learn about it, give me a shout.
 
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Oh please elaborate in full detail! Never tried said sauces myself, but very interested in hearing what the bear has to offer in a hot sauce. Also very interested in the process. Is it the same as making kimchi?
 
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Hello Wilson and welcome to the forum
I'm a home cook who loves to experiment and to be honest I'ce never heard of beer hoot sauce. That sakd, the idea sounds friggin amazing and I'd love to try to make some! I'd appreciate you sharing more info about it.
 
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A while back I cold smoked some habaneros, jalapenos and fresnos over the course of three days, maybe a total of 10 hours in the smoke. Mashed and salt fermented for about a month with some garlic. Ended up as a VERY tasty product.

mjb.
 
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Wow this is amazing, great response! i can give plenty of information as I am currently on my 8th batch! The easiest way to describe my process is as following:

Choose a variety of peppers and vegetables with different levels of heat. also consider what color you want your sauce to be. I like to choose a few very hot peppers such as habanero, ghost etc, as well as some more mild peppers such as Jalapeño/Ancho/Serrano, and maybe some veggies to add volume such as carrot, bell peppers, maybe fruit like pineapple, cucumber etc. For red sauces I may choose red ghost chilis, red serranos, and red bell pepper, I will also add some carrot or maybe strawberry for added sweetness. Chop items into bite size pieces, remove seeds if desired and place in a mason jar. I will then make a 3% brine with water and salt (10 cups warm water 2.6oz pickling salt). Then add just enough to cover the items in the jar.
Then take your favorite beer and add about 1 cup (have also forgone the brine and used only beer, its works just as fine) This is where it gets interesting. I have used an array of beers and again depending on your desired outcome you can choose different beers. I have found Ipas have some nice floral aromas that can be great but also consider bitterness. Sours can be great too with their fruitiness and acidity, it lends great to fermentation. I have stayed away from porters, stouts and dark beers in general but will try eventually and I will let you know how it goes.

Next, not necessary but very fun, you can add spices and extras to your hearts desire.
Some things I have had great success with: Cambodian Pepper Corns, Szechwan Peppercorns, Mustard Seeds, Chili Flakes, Rose petals (great color), Ginseng, elderberry syrup, lime wedges (remove before pureeing), really there are no limits to this.
I have also found that adding some Kombucha can have great results. Since it is a active and living product it can help to speed up the fermentation proccess.

Now seal all of this and put in a warm place for at least 5 days. Check it daily and open it to release the buildup of gasses. Taste the brine periodically and adjust for desired taste. I have let some ferment for as long as 2 weeks and have a few that will ferment for about 1 and 2 months. Most of the famous hot sauces (siracha, tobasco to name a few) are fermented. This is what adds that depth of flavor. Dont be afraid. As long as your looking at it daily and your dishes are clean you should be fine.

Finally while reserving the liquid, strain off the veggies and add to blender. add small amounts of the liquid at a time to achieve desired consistancey. Also taste while you are adding, remember this is your sauce, make it how you like it. You can add sugar, salt, vinegar, fresh chilis, more beer whatever you need to help it along. And boom you have a fire hot sauce ready to impress your friends and coworkers. I have continued to leave them out and the keep fermenting making them taste different and more complex every time you have them. If you love a certain taste throw it in the fridge to halt the proccess. if you leave out, continue to burp and carefull when opening, pressure can build up fast.

Sorry for the length, but its kinda a new thing and really all trial and error as of now. check out Bon Appetite Its Alive with Brad Leone on youtube (), he makes some fermented hot sauce and its the basis of my recipe. Just add beer where he would put in a brine and your good to go.

Let me know if you have questions or comments and have fun experimenting. let me know how it goes!

Chef Slader

*warning not responsible for exploding hot sauce bottles, burning mouths, or any injuries that occur during the hot sauce making proccess
 
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What style of beers have you found work the best?
I love ipas for floral and bitterness (although must be careful about too bitter). Sours are my favorite as they have so much fruitiness and the acidity helps to balance the sauce. simple lagers or pilsners or any mild body beer can be great but wont stand out due to the heat.
 
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Hmm a chocolate oatmeal milk stout habenero sauce... would pair well I think...
 
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Chop items into bite size pieces, remove seeds if desired and place in a mason jar. I will then make a 3% brine with water and salt (10 cups warm water 2.6oz pickling salt). Then add just enough to cover the items in the jar.
Then take your favorite beer and add about 1 cup (have also forgone the brine and used only beer, its works just as fine) This is where it gets interesting.

I'm really very interested in this method (I love beer and chillies!). I just got a little confused because you say use the beer instead of brine but in the description (see above quote) you mention a brine. Are you saying that you simply add beer to the chilli peppers and other spices but no salt? Sorry if I'm being stupid and not understanding!
 
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I'm really very interested in this method (I love beer and chillies!). I just got a little confused because you say use the beer instead of brine but in the description (see above quote) you mention a brine. Are you saying that you simply add beer to the chilli peppers and other spices but no salt? Sorry if I'm being stupid and not understanding!

im not the best at describing the process. covering your vegetables and peppers in a classic 3% brine is a great way to ferment them. see the video I posted, he does a much better job explaining and you can see it in action. Honestly easiest way is 1 lb of produce 1tablespoon of salt. That being said I have been adding half brine (3%) and half beer or just beer and about a tablespoon of salt. again this is all just trial and error. try three buy a bunch of random peppers, veggies and spices, and make a few different batches until you find what you like.
 

pete

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In regards to beer, my first thought was that although IPA has some great floral flavors I would be concerned about the bitterness as it is too easy to accidentally accentuate that bitterness making the sauce way too bitter, but I'll have to give it a second thought. Sours seem perfect for this application and I think I am going to try that myself. I was also thinking really malty german beers would be a great backbone for a sauce.

One other question, for your sauces, are you straining for a more tabasco like consistency or leaving everything in for a thicker consistency?
 
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Joined Feb 20, 2018
In regards to beer, my first thought was that although IPA has some great floral flavors I would be concerned about the bitterness as it is too easy to accidentally accentuate that bitterness making the sauce way too bitter, but I'll have to give it a second thought. Sours seem perfect for this application and I think I am going to try that myself. I was also thinking really malty german beers would be a great backbone for a sauce.

One other question, for your sauces, are you straining for a more tabasco like consistency or leaving everything in for a thicker consistency?


Its true, sometimes the bitterness is a bit much at first but it is easily combatted with some sugar content (sugar, carrot, apple, strawberry), and maybe some acid such as cidervin, lime, and maybe neutral flavors such as chickpeas. As for filtering I have filtered one for more of a tobasco consistency for dabbing but honestly i like these thick so the is less spice by volume and you can really dip a chip and take a big bite allowing for you to taste all the flavors and then be greated by that nice heat.
 
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