beef

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by mr b, Jan 6, 2005.

  1. mr b

    mr b

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    can anyone tell me a good way to cook beef joint ho ant why wont my yorkshire puddings rise
     
  2. mezzaluna

    mezzaluna

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    Cook At Home
    Answers to a few questions might make our advice more on the mark:

    1. What cut is the joint?
    2. What equipment do you have (convection or not, etc.)?
    3. Are you making the Yorkshire pudding in the pan or in individual muffin-type pans?
    4. Please post the recipes and methods you are using for both the beef roast and the pudding.
    5. Are you certain that your oven temperature is accurate?

    We'll do our best to lend a hand. :)
     
  3. mr b

    mr b

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    i have a gas oven i fry my beef in a dry frying pan then wrap it in tin foil put it in oven on gas mark 1 overnight but i just wonderd if there were diferent ways maybe diferent seasoning to try out
     
  4. lins

    lins

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    For your Yorkshire puddings, try using an equal mixutre (by Volume not by weight) of flour, eggs and milk. Make sure your oil in your tin is smoking hot before you add your pudding mix. This works for me every time!
    Beef,
    The larger the cut, the better the roast, look for a good layer of fat on the top, as this will keep your joint moist, also a nice marble effect of fat in the flesh will also help.
    The cooking will depend on your oven and on the cut of meat you buy!
     
  5. keeperofthegood

    keeperofthegood

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    Hey oh

    The levening of yorkshire pudding is the eggs. As such, it will "rise" by only a small amount. What gives the pudding its texture and volume is the rappid plunge into oil that is near or at the smoke point. Rappidly pouring in the batter will cause it to swirle around and up the sides of your muffen tin or roasting tray. In this, it is being cooked to the shape characteristicly know as yorkshire pudding. The additional 10 minutes alows for cook through (not expansion) of the batter, and for some browning to occure. But otherwise, it is cooked almost as soon as it hits that oil.

    Note of caution: DON'T SPLASH YOUR BATTER. Grease fires are not fun!! Nor are oil scalds.

    I have, off and on, watched this ladys web site for some years now (and she appears to be hosted here, looks like she's been bitten by fame again argg usage stats!!). She is pretty bang on, and sometimes is more directly informative than a lot of other such sites.

    http://www.britannia.com/cooking/rec...repudding.html