beef soup-bone?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by joepiebaker, Oct 18, 2004.

  1. joepiebaker

    joepiebaker

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    I'm wanting to make beef soup from scratch with a soup bone, but I don't really know what kind is usually used. Help is appreciated :D

    Joe
     
  2. headless chicken

    headless chicken

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    Beef + Veal bones cut in 2-4 inches in size, roasted for say 1h.
    If you worried about asthetics, use cold water (makes a clear broth).
    Use pan drippings to brown your veggies, de glaze with red wine.
     
  3. joepiebaker

    joepiebaker

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    Does it matter which bone?
     
  4. hans.schallenbe

    hans.schallenbe

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    do you want to make aa bouillon?

    hans
     
  5. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    Oxtail is the best IMO. Normally the bones you buy in the stores are neck bones. Make sure there's some meat on them.

    Smoked hamhocks make good soup too :)
     
  6. scott123

    scott123

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    Others may feel differently about this, but I am not a big fan of marrow bones in soup/stock. I find the flavor of the marrow permeates the whole stock and can be a little oppressive.
     
  7. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    Silly, after you roast your bones you dig out the marrow and eat it with white toast... crust cut off of course. :)
     
  8. chef from va

    chef from va

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    honestly this is why i love this site... cooks after my own heart! :cry: brings a tear to my eye to know that others enjoy roasted marrow as much as i do!!!

    definately use 2-2.5" thick cross cut leg bones, roast them until a rich brown(classicly you would rub them with a thick tomato product other than paste because it has to much sugar and can burn easily) of corse you scoop out the marrow and eat it on thinly sliced toasted bread (i like using cardamom bread... its the sweed in me :lips:) deglaze the roasting pan with redwine and make sure to scrape all of those delicious tidbits off of the bottom. make a sachet using (for 10 lbs of bones) 8-10 fresh parsley stems, 1-2 bay leaves, 1.5 tbsp whole tellicherry peppercorns, and 2 cloves of garlic slightly smashed and skinned. if you have stock from a previous batch use it inplace of or in addition to water for your stock (using another stock gives you a heartier stock with a more complex flavor profile) then simmer, depolage, and simmer some more.
     
  9. scott123

    scott123

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    Kuan, to each his own. Although I use marrow in a diluted form in a handful of recipes, I can't eat it straight. Thanks, but no. The taste of marrow reminds me of... well, I won't go there :)
     
  10. hans.schallenbe

    hans.schallenbe

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    fully agree with that, bone marrow is ok as garnish added last minute.

    on top, it is an headache skimming off all the fat.

    it was also mentioned to use veal bone. they are too high in collagen, and you dont want to thicken your bouillon. therefore best are fresh beef bones, and if you want to intencify the flavor, add, high connective beef meat, ligthly fatty and simmer bones and meat over 3 to 4 hours.

    The meat you then eat, with boiled potatoes, cabbage, mustard or horseradish or make a beef salad.

    hans
     
  11. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    **Sniff** I love you man :cry: **HUG**

    :) :D
     
  12. chef from va

    chef from va

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    :chef: :chef: :chef: :chef: :chef: :chef: :chef: :chef: :chef:
    :bounce: :bounce: :bounce: :bounce: :bounce: :bounce:

    Same Here Boss!
     
  13. kylew

    kylew

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    That's disgusting!

    I prefer to leave the crust on :)
     
  14. joepiebaker

    joepiebaker

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    Wow. Thanks for all the input. I'll also try the marrow on toast with my daughter. She LOVES toast and doesn't eat well. I try to sneek in good foods as much as I can.

    Thank You!!!

    Joe. :chef:
     
  15. diva

    diva

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    I was trained in french cuisine.. but Italy made my life easier!
    Bollito Misto
    Is the Italian boiled beef dinner.. which feeds families for days!

    no more roasting of bones!
    try it

    Buon appetito! :lips:
     
  16. schwanke

    schwanke

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    Heck no, it doesn't matter what type of bones and beef went into the pot, I use a mixture of everything I get from a whole steer, from the trimmed shortrib bones to the bigger leg sections.

    You could have simmered it all night, although you'd have to make sure you have plenty of liquid and your stock might not be as clear because of the vegetables and bone marrow, etc. Simmering that long would probably just disintegrate those items and the solids would disperse into the stock.

    Some people strain the broth to make it more clear, I don't bother.
     
  17. chefedb

    chefedb

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    I always tried to get Shin Bones and cut them about 3 inches.The marrow is sometime served as a garnish for a consomme. some people put on toast rounds some make a canape on toast rounds.
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2010
  18. teamfat

    teamfat

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    Well, "beef soup" can cover a lot of different styles.  When I make beef stock I usually start with either oxtail or back rib bones.  Roasted in a hot oven for about 45 minutes, maybe an hour.  By the time the stock is done what little meat is on the bones is not really worth eating so it gets strained out and some other cut is added to make soup.

    But if you are making oxtail soup and not just beef stock or broth, that's different.  Shucks.  On another thread I was inspired to make a roast chicken for sunday's dinner.  Now I'm thinking oxtail soup and grilled cheese sandwich.  Decisions, decisions.

    mjb.
     
  19. tjbt

    tjbt

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    Several points I would like to make....

    Roasting bones gives a heartier flavor to stock/broth which is often desireable to the tongue.

    But some now say it is healthier NOT to roast bones/meat.  High heat produces carcinogenic compounds - heterocyclic amines....

    It's your choice, hearty flavor or health concerns.   Many countries in the world simply boil their meats as ovens are not readily available.

    Regarding the collagen excesses in veal bones, some might prefer the unctuous stock/broth this would produce.   Again it is a matter of taste.   In Italy they serve a sausage made with part pork skin (high collagen and very unctuous) during the holidays.  Certainly there are many health advantages to veal stock/broth for therapeutic use to aid in the healing of wounds and  ligament and tendon injuries - noteworthy is the high content of manganese along with the collagen used by the body to knit and repair.
     
  20. thatchairlady

    thatchairlady

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    Learned to make veggie beef soup from my Grandmother and consider it a "dump" recipe!?!  She'd start with chunks of beef and bones... have NO idea if there was a special type of bones?  Well browned then the dump began.  Lots of celery/carrot/onion... and REQUIRED bay leaf?!?  Have no idea how old hers were but never realized they actually HAD a flavor until I bought my own??  Some kinda tomato product... whole, crushed, sauce.  Big handful of split peas and navy beans.  Then whatever veggies ya might have left over iin fridge.  Cabbage, if ya had it... usually did.  Water to fill pot and a nice long/slow simmer.