Beef Cuts for a French-style steak haché?

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I want to start grinding my own meat for the first time, so what's best than a simple steak haché, basically a patty of freshly ground beef
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It's tempting to think burger patty, but this won't be served with a bun, it will be plated with a side, and I believe it's typically much leaner than a burger patty. A bit of researched turned up that the ideal fat content is 5%, so way below burgers

Any idea what the best cut to use is? I can find answers on French websites but that's no help since French butchers make way more individual cuts in a cow than American butchers: 
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Sirloin is on sale today, would sirloin work? 

New York steaks are also on sale and just a couple bucks more than sirloin, would they work? 

I'm basically looking to replicate the flavor of the typical French steak haché of my childhood ... cooked rare. 
 
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Sounds very interesting, I've never heard of this dish.  Can you describe what it is?  Does it have other ingredients in it like steak tartare or a meatloaf?  

I think sirloin is a very tasty piece of meat, I like it better than NY strip, it's a bit more tender.  You could also use tenderloin of course.
 
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Sounds very interesting, I've never heard of this dish.  Can you describe what it is?  Does it have other ingredients in it like steak tartare or a meatloaf?  

I think sirloin is a very tasty piece of meat, I like it better than NY strip, it's a bit more tender.  You could also use tenderloin of course.
It's a very super simple dish, just 100% beef, freshly ground, no other ingredients: in France we go to the butcher and they grind the meat to order, and you eat it right away. I have seen a butcher recommend a combination of 50-50 chuck and tenderloin. But that could get a bit expensive. 

I suppose I might be able to use different cuts, from the chuck, the front or rear leg... I'm starting to believe that Round may be a good cut for this, although maybe not tender enough... 

Yeah you're right maybe for the first time I should just go with Sirloin. 

Here are a few pictures of what it often looks like: 



 
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I subscribe to a couple of French cooking magazines and recipes referring to "steak haché" usually end up with the meat cooked in some fashion, although you would definitely need haché to make tartare.

One of my favorites things is the French way of making an "au poivre" sauce after sautéing a hamburger/steak haché.  Suddenly a weeknight meal is haute cuisine!
 
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(...) you would definitely need haché to make tartare.

One of my favorites things is the French way of making an "au poivre" sauce after sautéing a hamburger/steak haché.  Suddenly a weeknight meal is haute cuisine!
Traditionally you wouldn't use haché (ground meat) to make a tartare, but mince the meat with your knife. 

I LOVE sauce au poivre, and often do it with 'normal' (not ground or minced) steaks. IMO the best steak for au poivre is a thinly cut rib-eye (as close as I can get to 'entrecôte'), about 1/2" to 3/4", served blue. Skirt steak also works great for this. Sirloin or New York would also work. Oh I guess just about any steak would work with a sauce au poivre. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/lol.gif
 
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@French Fries    Oui, vous aviez raison sur de viande mincée pour le tartare.  Je m'ai trompé de ça.

I love au poivre also, what I meant was although I usually get it with a steak, it also raises a simple pan fried burger up to a high level.  /img/vbsmilies/smilies/drinkbeer.gif  

Sorry for the confusion.
 
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Thank you French Fries, I was hoping someone French to help us here. Merci
 
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Any time. If there's one thing I'm good at... it's being French.  /img/vbsmilies/smilies/lol.gif  
 
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