Bechamel and beyond.

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by cape chef, Jul 30, 2004.

  1. cape chef

    cape chef

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    The discussion in regards to the proper technique of preparing sauce Bechamel got me thinking about other sauces.

    I know we have talked about sauces many times on Cheftalk, but why not talk about some of our favorite sauces to prepare, how we prepare them, and what we use them with.

    One of my favorite sauces to make in the Fall is " Sauce Grand Veneur" which is a Poivrade sauce made with game stock and finished with reduced cream and a touch of currant jelly. I serve this sauce with assorted types of game meats and birds. It's deep, rich flavor ties beautifully with the richness of the game, while the bit of sweetness from the currants balances the game meats.
     
  2. travelchick

    travelchick

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    Well, this isn't a traditional sauce but I love a spicy coconut sauce with jumbo shrimp.

    Sometimes I use half heavy cream and half coconut milk (sometimes all coconut milk) reduce, add some peanut butter, fish sauce, as much hot pepper sauce as you can stand, a little coconut extract, unsweetened grated coconut, lime zest, cumin, sea salt, pepper, etc.

    I parboil the shrimp separately (deveined and shelled), drain and toss them in the sauce for a minute to finish cooking then serve.

    Cilantro makes a nice garnish.

    And sugar! I forgot the sweet part! :D
     
  3. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    Sauce! Great topic CC, but you didn't specify hot or cold! I'll throw mine in.

    I like a Cumberland sauce. It's not commonly used these days because the art of cold food seems to have fallen in the toilet. Very good with cold meats, pates, confits, and such. I like to peel the skin off the lemons and oranges by hand, remove the white part and then julienne the zest very fine. Use a fine porto (be sure to taste first) and some homemade blackberry jam. Try it this holiday season with your turkey instead of the usual cranberry sauce. Very good!
     
  4. travelchick

    travelchick

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    Warmed I bet that would go nicely with duck or foie gras.
     
  5. mikeb

    mikeb

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    Well, I'm probably not as experienced as most but one I make alot is a sweet and sour sauce - Lemon juice, a little tomato paste for colour and texture, some chicken stock, honey for sweetness (also add some wine if I have any available). I simmer for quite a bit until it's reduced to a thick consistency (or you can cheat with a roux). Usually serve with chicken. Or I'll make it as part of a lemon chicken recipe - brown the chicken pieces, then slow cook in the juices, remove chicken after a few hours, finish sauce...
     
  6. travelchick

    travelchick

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    Mike that sounds great. What color does it turn out? Slightly orangy/red?
     
  7. mikeb

    mikeb

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    Yeah, red/orange. Can also use a can of lemonade for a simpler version - just lemonade and a little tomato paste.
     
  8. travelchick

    travelchick

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    Very cool. I'll remember that. I've been wanting to do a simple version of a sweet and sour sauce and didn't think of tomato paste. Thanks :)
     
  9. cape chef

    cape chef

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    Kuan, I also enjoy Cumberland sauce. When I was in Garde Manger class years ago and we studied Charcuterie, Cumberland sauce was also taught.

    Many times I would roast a saddle of venison, glaze it with Cumberland sauce, make a compote of ficelle pears, and garnish with more cumberland sauce.
     
  10. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    Though I have a lot of sauces that I really like, one of my favorite is a little used sauce, Sauce Charcutiere. It is a Sauce Robert (a demi sauce with the addition of sauteed onions, white wine, vinegar and mustard) that has julienned Cornichons added to it. I like to use it with pork dishes, smoked meats, or some game.
     
  11. chefboy2160

    chefboy2160

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    If cold is in than I shall add the most prolific of dipping sauces for cold shrimp, the cocktail sauce.
    Ketchup,horseradish,lemon juice,tobasco, worcestershire sauce,ground black pepper and some finely minced green onion(the green parts just after the white ends) and thats it. Good presentaion and great flavor.
    Ok, this thread is great so who is next?Doug...........
     
  12. koen

    koen

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    well, one of mine is Pesto Di Genovese , the basilleaves , roasted pinekernels,
    freshley grated reggiano,garlic,olive oil . and its so divers to use,
    so simple,so ..divine :)
    sauce Grand Veneur is definitly one of the greater ones
     
  13. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    Another sauce I like making is "orange" sauce as in Duck a l'orange. It's actually a technically demanding sauce to make on the fly because it entails making a caramel first, and then try to do it quick! OK, maybe you can make a batch of it ahead of time. :)

    This is a great sauce to test your newbie culinary grads when they come on the line. <evil look> ;) I bet most people would fail French cuisine if they had to do this sauce on their exam!

    Incidently, this sauce has been adopted by many cultures. In Hong Kong, for example, you can order "orange beef." It's basically a steak, sauteed in a wok, sliced up and dressed with this sauce. Minus the duck stock of course. It's great!

    Kuan
     
  14. cape chef

    cape chef

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    As you know Kuan, this technique of sauce making is called a "Gastrique" in which you rapidly reduce sugar to caramel then deglaze with equal amounts of an acid (usually vinegar) to form your base of "sweet and sour" My final practicals in Regional French entail making a gastrique sauce to serve with magret du canards. These are juniors, so they may well know how to prepare this type of sauce if a chefs challenges them :)
     
  15. travelchick

    travelchick

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    Well, for a cold dipper, I've been doing a delish mango sambal...

    Finely chopped mango, orange marmalade, orange-champagne vinegar, walnut oil, chili sauce, fish sauce, chile pepper flakes, sugar, chives, salt pepper.

    It is wonderful with seared scallops!
     
  16. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    There goes CC, raising the bar again! Good job! Such a classic sauce, it's great if done well. I can't wait, 20 years from now, I'll be reading in some foodie magazine where one of your students mentions that he learned the classics from you! :)