battered/breaded items to order

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by chezj023, Mar 17, 2014.

  1. chezj023

    chezj023

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    Hello all,

    Hope everyone is doing great!

    I am wondering if anyone can share experiences of encountering issues with battering or breading items to order for service, such as onion rings for example.

    What was your issue? timing, quality, consistency?

    How did you solve it?

    And any tips on breading and battering items to order would be more than helpful!

    Thanks to everyone!
     
  2. chefbuba

    chefbuba

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    Is it only onion rings? Breaded or battered?
     
  3. rbrad

    rbrad

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    You can bread items before service and cook to order but you should batter to order.........some places oil blanch then reheat but the results leave a lot to be desired.
     
  4. kingofnull

    kingofnull

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    I typically batter then bread my onion rings.  To order is best in my experience, but I had a party a few weeks ago and just batter/breaded then trayed them.  To my taste they came out the same as when we batter/bread per order.
     
  5. chezj023

    chezj023

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    Thanks for the advice!
     
  6. recky

    recky

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    Hi Chezj,

    in my restaurant I do lots of breaded veal or pork escalope, Viennese style, i.e. pounded schnitzels, flour, egg wash and breadcrumbs, briskly pan-fried in about an inch of oil.

    During slower services I bread them to order, otherwise I prep as many as I expect to sell within the next 90 minutes just before service. Once breaded, they keep in the fridge for a maximum of two hours, then they quickly deteriorate, i.e. the breading goes soggy, so they won't crisp up in the pan.

    I don't know what shit goes into the breading of the prefab frozen schnitzels you can buy, but they always crisp up nicely, no matter how soggy they are after defrosting. Obviously though, they taste like cardboard breaded with wood chip...

    Cheers,

    Recky
     
  7. phaedrus

    phaedrus

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    I agree, some things can be breaded a bit in advance but battered stuff needs to be done to order.  Onion rings work pretty well if you keep a large metal mixing bowl and spatula in the cooler; just spin each batch of rings in the bowl as needed.
     
  8. ed buchanan

    ed buchanan

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    I dip in batter then crumbs then refrigerate a while
     
  9. chefbuba

    chefbuba

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    I do beer battered onion rings on the food truck. Make a batch almost daily.

    My method is to dip and par fry in 300* oil in the open kettle, no basket just until the batter is set, remove to basket to drain, cool on sheet pan and store in fridge, keeps well for about 24 hrs.

    Fried to order at 350* to finish. They are very crisp and the onion is cooked through.

    My batter uses 2lbs cornstarch to three 16oz cans beer with three eggs, baking powder, flour, s&p, granulated onion & garlic and is not too thick.
     
  10. left4bread

    left4bread

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    I just but the beer batter onion rings. y'know, brew city type.

    Bubba, is it worth the effort? Brew City is in Cash&Carry

    (I know it's not for you, bubba, you do fresh, but is it worth it?)
     
  11. chefbuba

    chefbuba

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    Yes it's worth it. I only serve five things and try my best to keep the quality high. Cost approx .50 to make, sell for 3.75
     
    brandon odell likes this.
  12. taylor frost

    taylor frost

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    I use your same method for the onion rings we serve on our burgers with great results.  I would do them to order if I had the space but we only have one fryer which sees its fair share of action throughout the day and I can't stand having batter all over the place.