Basics of sauce making?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by latemp, Mar 21, 2012.

  1. latemp

    latemp

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    Anyone know where I can find the basics of sauce making? I can make a sauce from a recipe, and I kind of have an idea of how they generally go together, but I've never been able to find a break down of how a sauce comes together so I could possible make my own sauces.
     
  2. tracymc

    tracymc

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    Do you want to elaborate some, any sauces in particular?
     
  3. latemp

    latemp

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    Oh sorry...I'm speaking towards sauces for a meat/fish/poultry entree
     
  4. someday

    someday

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    that should get you started...
     
  5. left4bread

    left4bread

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    I cannot recommend this enough.



    It's James Peterson.

    As a line cook, it made me. It transformed me. I learned to cook from chefs that I worked for, but this book was my basis.

    It was my "go to".

    Still is. The history of, the achieve of, the mastery... A great author who can turn a verse. And gives the history of.

    To a fault. The recipe for bearnaise occupies 4 pages.
     
  6. chefedb

    chefedb

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    If you want the classic way it's Guide Culinaire by A. Escoffier ( crown press)

    It starts from the stocks and goes upward into the 5 mothers and onward
     
  7. left4bread

    left4bread

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    is it approchable? is it easy to read? i guess that is what i'm asking.
     
  8. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Originally Posted by left4bread  
    Not really.  Not for most people. Furthermore, most of the classic sauces from 100 years ago are outmoded and dated, as are most of the "thickening by starch" techniques.  I still use a lot of that junk, but you probably shouldn't. 

    If your very serious about developing sauce technique, Larousse or Peterson will serve you best and provide a large compendium of recipes as well.  If all you want are a few basic sauces and enough technique to allow you some improvisation, you're probably better off with a few, good general cookbooks -- or cookbooks oriented towards the cuisine in question -- and asking specific questions on a forum like this one.

    BDL
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2012
  9. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Larousse is also old shool and  is still good because it starts with the stocks . Some sauce making may seem to  be old  fashioned but todays

    cooking is still based on them. I am not talking microwave and good housekeeping using Campbells soups.  Although some prepared cream soups could be classified as Veloute"s
     
  10. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Ed, you're mixing up the Larousse Gastronomique with David Larousse's excellent books on sauces and stocks, especially The Sauce Bible.  They are not the same, and David Larousse is not "old school."  I'm sorry for any confusion my lack of specificity may have engendered.  I suppose I overestimated the general awareness of David Larousse.

    BDL
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2012
  11. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Sorry, never heard of him. Have heard of Peterson.
     
  12. deltadude

    deltadude

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    So, lets have two titles with author names that would be good for home cooks aspiring to raise their expertise and dishes? Useful would be some shortcuts that cut down on expensive & labor intensive stocks or other necessary but uncommon ingredients not typically found in a home pantry. An example is pro kitchen Demi Glace the paste type, used for a wide variety of meat sauces. I haven't found anything close to that in my local stores, "Better Than Bouillon" in beef is the only thing that is close, maybe if I could get their Au Jus base that would be close.