Barbecue (Smoking) Forums

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by boar_d_laze, Jul 23, 2011.

  1. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    I went over and joined the Smoke Ring Forums on thetincook's recommendation in another thread, have been lurking and read through lots of threads, but don't see much to interest me. Curious as to what Tin thinks is good -- if he's reading this. 

    Maybe I'm missing something.

    Since changing heat sources from gas to charcoal and moving from a horizontal offset to a vertical, water smoker (BWS Fatboy), the abysm of my ignorance, never small, has enlarged dramatically.  I'm certainly looking for a good barbeque forum.  If anyone happens to be in or otherwise know of one, please let me know.

    BDL
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2011
  2. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    I've never found a good bbq forum either. They all think they have the secrets and won' t discuss deeply.
     
  3. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    I've never found a good bbq forum either. They all think they have the secrets and won' t discuss deeply. Or don't really know what they think'they know.
     
  4. thetincook

    thetincook

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    /shrug I like it mainly because it has a very active membership base with a lot of professionals. Kinda like a cheftalk about bbq. As a general rule about forums, I think you'll find more of interest if you start topics re your interest and/or be active in discussion rather then lurking.

    Guess it's a case of YMMV
     
  5. Iceman

    Iceman

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    I'd love to talk BBQ. OK, so maybe you don't want to hear me talk. Still, we can talk here as much as you want. We are all kinda sorta professionals, right? We should be able to have some good conversations. 
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2011
  6. thetincook

    thetincook

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    Any of you guys used an altoshaam with smoke?
     
  7. Iceman

    Iceman

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    I've used a [​IMG]  on my car. 
     
  8. chefbillyb

    chefbillyb

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    Still don't see what the big deal is in BBQ/Smoking. I could see BBQ in the South, people didn't have much money, they had to use the least tender cuts of meat. Does anyone really think the people in Mexico would be eating all the guts and head of the Cow if they were offered the prime cuts. They made something out of whatever the rancher threw out. I raise my own Black Angus Cows, I would rather eat the prime cuts and taste the real flavor of the meat................When I get a craving for smoke, I'll eat some jerky..............The bone in Prime Rib goes in the oven at noon........................ChefBillyB
     
  9. panini

    panini

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    You know, ChefBillyB, I think you're pretty close.

    We don't talk much bout smokin down here because it's somthin we always done. Most everyone knows how to smoke. It's like chili, most recipes,method and proceedure will vary

    from one to the other. Then the smoking world blew up. Then all the hoity toities started to try to claim the method by doing all this silly tweeking and changing things up.

        Billy, you're right about the money. The best barbque is the cheapest barbque. Gather free local woods, oak,pecan. Make your smoker out of anything that you find to be acceptable.

    Put that meat in the smoker before your last shiner and mother will bring up the fixins in the morning.

       The best barbque for me is at my brother in laws ranch. Actually ours but he built the house. We usually have 30-40 staying there and we invite the local twns people. Pop. 350++

    Neighbor has cows so he supplies the beef&pork. We use cheap ole aluminum garbage cans. Small door by the bottom for wood to go in and we just run rebar through each side to create grates. We have an old apple orchard way back on the property. We sent all the kids out on the quads to retrieve the wood. This was our best tasting so far.

       I invited all the chef friends I know to come up in Sept. We're going to spend a few days hunting hogs. I have never smoked one before. Sound hot but sounds like fun.

      You know, it's like poker hold em. When I arrived here decades ago, hold em was a trash game we used to play after a few shiners. We would sit out and play dominos and inside was hold em.  Now you go to play hold em and the tables are full of younger players wearing baseball hats and sunglasses. Thinking their playing for millions. LOL

    Ice, what the hell is that?
     
  10. eastshores

    eastshores

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    I'd say largely the experience. BBQ is low and slow cooking, which you know can be done in an oven, so why the fanaticism about it? Well, have you ever spent 9 hours sitting around with a light breeze and a cold brew talking and laughing, people playing music, kids running around having fun. All of it building to a climax of an epic line of perfectly cooked briskets, pork, chicken, etc. and all of the great sides that usually accompany it? Smoking/BBQ is an event more than just a food. I love a good prime cut steak as much as anyone else but that enjoyment is not mutually exclusive to the enjoyment of a great BBQ.
     
  11. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    BillyB,

    Surely you jest.  If you think smoking proteins, "low and slow" is and or was traditionally limited to the south, or traditionally limited to less desirable cuts, you're buying the good ol' boys' BS -- and at retail. 

    BDL
     
  12. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    I'm not looking for recipes particularly, or beginner advice -- not that it doesn't hurt to meditate on fundamentals.  I've been smoking for close to forty years, including doing a fair bit of catering, and I'm just not seeing the stuff I want to read at the Smoke Ring Forums, not reading much by people with whom I'd care to share a dialogue.  Maybe I'm just looking in the wrong threads. 

    Smoking is often very equipment dependent.  Things like fire management, wrapping, temperature choices, and so on vary from pit to pit.  I'm not seeing much about my new type of smoker.

    [​IMG]

    Not the particular brand -- Backwoods -- so much, but tight, charcoal fired cabinets with water pans.  It may seem a rather highly specialized topic, but they're not really all that uncommon.  If active forum members were doing it, I think I'd see it by browsing and lurking.  There's certainly plenty of other type and brand specific stuff -- which may better relate to what you do and use.

    I appreciate your advice about forum participation though, and will bear it in mind. 

    Thanks,

    BDL
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2011
  13. thetincook

    thetincook

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    Sorry, didn't mean to be pedantic or condescending.

    One of the most popular builds on the forum is a vertical smoker with water pan (they are split on the water pan part), so I'm guessing that there is some useful information out there. Fire management is so idiosyncratic, that I don't think you could expect anything more then general principles.
     
  14. panini

    panini

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    Tin,

      It would make it easier if you used words that I didn't need to google./img/vbsmilies/smilies/eek.gif

    Quote:

    not reading much by people with whom I'd care to share a dialogue  

     I'm sure I fit that description, but wondering who the boy's are?

    Quote:
    Any given Sat. or Sun. when it's below 95F there will be at least 20 smokers going in the neighbor. It's part of the culture.

    I spent a lot of time up North in various States. I'm not bsing when I say I never saw or heard of any smoking going on.

    60-70's I also can't recall any Mexican eateries.

    There was a lot of Bar b quing going on. No hot smoking.  There was some cool smoking going in the late 70's. But that was mainly

    directing smoke over fish with a large ember in for flavor.  

    I'm sure I'll be bounced for this but it's common knowledge here that The bar b que came up from the islands to the indians in Kentucky then to Tex.

    I don't think equipment has anything to do with a good smoke. I had the oportunity to attend bar b ques with decendants of slaves. They live in the country

    and smoke in a pit. Native Texans with a history here would never put beef in the smoker. It's always pork. I think the beef came into play as smoking spread

    toward Kansas City. We tend to smoke at a lower temp. then most. I have to chuckle when people refer to putting water under the meat as wet smoking.

    From what I've seen it looks like steaming to me. The water is to stop flare up from the drip and controll heat if you don't have a seperate box. I have had the purposely steamed version

    that was outstanding. They actually imparted flavor that way with original DR. Pepper and Jack Daniels in the pot. They go hot on the beginning

    so that the liquid actually simmers.  

    There has been a movement towards injectioning. I actually use a vetanarian autopsy tools for injection. gross? no?

    BTW Boar_d,

    When I was talking about standup smokers with water,I wasn't referring to yours. Those smokers have become popular here. I think it's a Chubby?

    I've got a good buddy that has a boat in LA. We usually drive and tow one of my toys down to the Shrimp & Petroleum Festival. This year we are

    definately stopping by backwoods to pick up a smoker. My neighbor has one and I use it a lot. There is a difference though. The water tray can be used to controll heat.

    Well back to Hold-em

    pan
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2011
  15. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Panini,

    You're an interesting guy with a big storehouse of knowledge, but...  Talk about buying the BS.

    The word "barbecue" was almost certainly derived from a Taino word.  So, you kinda sorta got a little bit of truth with that.  I'm not sure where the Kentucky connection comes in, as for the rest... not so much.  Just think about it and it's intuitively obvious that if grilling and/or smoking were "invented" in North America, those methods were independently discovered by the Africans, Asians and Europeans -- since they (we, really) were doing those things since deep pre-prehistory. 

    Do you think the ancients never cooked a piece of meat in a wood fired, indirect heat oven?  Do you think the Huns needed Columbus to teach them smoke sausage?  Do you think no one ever cued and pulled a pork shoulder until the English populated the Carolinas? Sorry, but great uncle Billy Bob wasn't the first -- no matter what he says. 

    I'm not saying that the southern American style of barbecue hasn't become the dominant style in the U.S., nor even saying that it doesn't form the basis of most of what I 'cue and how I usually go about it when doing low and slow smoking.  But there are other, just as wonderful ways.  I grew up in a couple of California's central coastal valleys, and let me tell you that what we did there was darn sure barbecue even if it didn't look a lot like KCBS.

    You're over-generalizing form your own experience I think, and what you said about "Mexican Eateries" bears that out.  If "Mexican" food went north from Texas it also did from the rest of the border and Gadsden states -- California, Arizona, Nevada, New Mexico and Colorado.  In California we have two major, authentic styles (although you seldom see them distinguished) actual, regional Mexican and "Californio."  And I know all the other states which had been part of Mexico have something along the same lines.

    The point being that much as Mexican food did not originate in Texas nor even play the dominant role in it becoming national, so with the roots of barbecue. 

    Moving right along...

    The "Chubby" is the junior version of a "Fatboy."  If you do a lot of entertaining the Chubby is kind of small.  The Fatboy isn't all that big either.  It sems like whichever BWS model you're talking about, you're talking about a very tight, easy to control, cooker.  There have been more than a few guys who've tried to adapt the water pan to sand -- like a lot of folks do with WSMs -- but it doesn't seem to have netted any really impressive results; on top of that, even though dealing with the sludge that gets in the pan is not the most pleasant task, it's a lot better than clean up would be if there were nothing or anything else down there; and the cherry on top is that it helps stabilize the temp by acting as a ballast.

    I've only done five cooks on mine so far, and am nowhere near ready to review it yet in any considered sort of way, but I think you could do a LOT worse.  One of those things which is "very expensive for what it is, but still a bargain."  If you're going to buy one, order way early.  There's a lot of lead time, especially if you want any custom mods.

    I'm still trying to figure out the best fuels for mine.  I've tried commercial grade mesquite lump charcoal and some very high end briquettes (Lazzari) for heat.  The briquette got the pit up to cooking temp much faster, and overall was a very pleasant surprise -- but too expensive.  The mesquite I get (from CalChar) has lots of lumps too big for the Fatboy's fire pan.  That not only means picking through my charcoal bin, but that I can't pack the firebox as evenly as I like.  At the end of the day, I think I'll end up using one of the better mesquite lumps like Lazzari Mesquite, but haven't got there yet.

    For smoke, I've been using some old pecan chunk but it's kind of dry and not doing the best job in the world. Just that little bit acrid, if you know what I mean.  But while it's easy to get fireplace log size hardwood here, it's hard to get good chunk and splits.  They tend to not only be expensive (drag), but also dried out (major drag) to stay "stabilized" in their plastic-bag packaging.  I suppose I could get a chain saw and set up a little station out back, but laziness got to me and I ordered 50 lbs each of oak and pear splits from Fruita.  How bad can it be?  If I can find some good maple at a reasonable price, another fifty pounds should take me all the way through the fall.

    FWIW, I usually cold smoke over oak and/or cherry -- but that's a different rig.

    BDL

    PS.  If I seem prickly I apologize. 
     
    gourmetm likes this.
  16. panini

    panini

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    Well, I guess you educated me? I did write Ken. instead of Car.Thats a mental problem I have. I mentioned that I never saw Mex. when I was up north.

    I don't have enough knowedge to speak on origin.

    I think, gros blagueur, is the last thing I am or buy into. Most all of my knowledge is from word of mouth. I prefer this method mainly because

    most everything in print now a days is either bogus or has a specific agenda. I think a lot of people get a little confused when they talk about( smoking)

    and bar b que. I thought I was posting to smoking which would eliminate the accusation of BS.

      I think I'm going to take a break from posting and do a little lurking.

       I'll let those that respond to almost everything, regurgitate from wikipedia.  

    GTG. have to check my pork butts in the smoker. Got a lamb leg goin also. tryin a new (mushed garlic,mint,peach,tequilla) injection./img/vbsmilies/smilies/smoking.gif
     
  17. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    Come on boar. There's no way this can be taken well, particularly in text without the benefit of tone of voice. It's a personal attack and forbidden by the rules.  Don't go there.
     
  18. maryb

    maryb

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    The BBQ forums are populated with new people who buy into the "you have to cook they way they do at BBQ competitions to be any good" mentality. Having cooked with all wood in a Klose, charcoal in the typical cheap leaky offset, charcoal in a weber grill, and now a wood pellet fired Traeger I can say they all produce a slightly different product but all are good and I would serve it to anyone other than a BBQ competition judge who is using his idea of what BBQ should taste like to judge it. Home cooks can do the best with what they have and turn out very good food. And yes the fun is having the neighbors over for an afternoon of slow cooking and socializing.
     
  19. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    I apologize to Panini and the board if my post seemed like a personal attack.  It wasn't meant that way, but clearly was inartfully worded. 

    BDL
     
  20. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Posted by MaryB  

    Mary,

    I agree with every word you posted here.  I've been a member of several forums, most of them not very good, and mostly for the reasons you mentioned.  I was on that actually was good, but it was invitation only, I lost the address several years ago during one of my periodic flights from the net, and can't figure out how to get back.

    What I'm hoping to find is a forum which includes people who cook at a fairly high level, a diversity of barbecue styles -- not just "KCBS" or even American south -- and some depth of experience with Backwoods smokers. 

    FWIW, I'm enjoying the heck out of my BWS Fatboy and have got it rigged with both a Guru and the new Maverick ET-732.  The Guru minds the pit and the Mav lets me know that all is well... or not.  I haven't done that many cooks on it, but it seems to run faster than my old small offset.  I attribute it to the extra tightness and humidity transferring heat more efficiently -- but am not sure.  Anyway, that's the sort of thing I'd like to discuss outside the BWS forum which does have smoker specific wisdom, but not the depth of cooking creativity and expertise.

    Maybe that forum doesn't exist, or maybe this just isn't the right place to ask.

    BDL