Bar Keepers Friend on tin lined copper?

Discussion in 'Cooking Equipment Reviews' started by kmr54, Mar 4, 2011.

  1. kmr54

    kmr54

    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    Does anyone know if the acid in BKF is destructive to tin lining of copper pots?

    Thanks in advance
     
  2. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

    Messages:
    4,333
    Likes Received:
    83
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    Although I've used BKF on finishes other than tin, may I recommend using a moistened, thick paste of baking soda along with a soft, plastic scouring pad (that resembles an expanded piece of steel wool) for scrubbing.  You may find it acts much gentler on the finish than BKF as the paste won't leave any scratches.
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2011
  3. chefross

    chefross

    Messages:
    2,726
    Likes Received:
    383
    Exp:
    Former Chef
    I use BKF on my French tin lined copper. It is not an abrasive but an anti-oxidant. It only attacks the carbon and leaves the copper shiny and new. I use a plastic scrub pad on the tin lining to get off hard stuck on food.
     
  4. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

    Messages:
    4,333
    Likes Received:
    83
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    Chefross, you mean to state that BKF doesn't scratch copper!  Hmmmm, it seems to leave really fine scratches on my bathroom surfaces.  Interesting.
     
     
  5. kmr54

    kmr54

    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    Thanks for the replies. 

    I have been using BKF for years on my French copper/stainless interior.  I also have several French copper/tin interior pots and pans.

    My question is specifically about the effect of BKF on the tin. It seems to leave interesting designs on the tin  - almost like Damascus cladding on a Japanese knife.

    To your collective knowledge - is this harmful to the tin or in some way shortens the life of the tin?

    Thanks again.
     
  6. chefross

    chefross

    Messages:
    2,726
    Likes Received:
    383
    Exp:
    Former Chef
    I understand what you are talking about. I use a small amount of BFK and a drop or 2 of water, then use my fingers to work it in. It does leave those small scratches that Kokopuffs talks about, but I have been using it for years and have not lost any of the tin from it.Where I see the most lost of the tin is from using whips and/or metal utensils when cooking. Also copper pans are not supposed to be used with high heat. The metals' ability to conduct heat is such that using a lower setting for a longer time is better than a high heat right off the bat.

    It took some getting used to.

    We have sent our copper to a guy in Colorado to be re-tinned twice in the past 14 years but the copper remains shiny and beautiful.
     
  7. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

    Messages:
    4,333
    Likes Received:
    83
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    I'll bet that it's ROCKY MOUNTAIN RETINNING that you sent your utensils for retinning because that's who I used once.  They do an outrageous job retinning.  True artistes in the art of retinning.
     
  8. chefross

    chefross

    Messages:
    2,726
    Likes Received:
    383
    Exp:
    Former Chef
    Yup.....the very same...Eric Undiks his name and he does a great job. We are very pleased with his quality work
     
  9. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

    Messages:
    4,333
    Likes Received:
    83
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    In 2001 I purchased a Mauviel 12 qt tin lined hand hammered stockpot, delivered to my door for a total cost of $50 (fifty dollars U.S.).  I paid another $50 to have the stockpot retinned by Mr. Eric.  And I sold the item on Craigslist for $580 within 15 minutes of posting the ad.  EAT YOUR HEARTS OUT, TROOPIES!!!!!!!!!!