Baking with applesauce

42
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Joined Nov 6, 2001
I have been reading that baking with apple sause is much more healthier than baking with olive oil.
Everyone knows that applesauce is the best replacement on fats.
replacing 1 cup of olive oil with 1 cup of applesauce you can skip 105 extra calories.

When you use apple sauce in cakes or muffins do you have to reduce the amount of sugar?

Thanks
 
1,640
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Joined Mar 6, 2001
Quickly, you should never be using olive oil 'in' baked items....it's an extremely rare rare recipe that would use such a strong flavored oil. Use canola oil instead.

You can sub. in applesauce in SOME recipes and they'll work fine (if you like drier baked goods). BUT don't beleive you can put it in all recipes and have them work. Baking is science and subbing in or out some ingredients is not done with-out ALOT of wasted attempts along the way. Sugar gives moisture to baked goods so cutting back on sugar and fat is going to give you some pretty dry results.



Personally I'd rather eat one great piece of cake then four dry slices..............;)
 

isa

3,236
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Joined Apr 4, 2000
I bake a lot with applesauce, a great way to cut your fat intake. You have to choose your recipes carefully since it doesn't work with fine pastry. I find it is best to stick to muffin and quick breads.


Remember that you can not cut out all of the fat. You have to leave about 2 tablespoons of oil.


As for sugar, I always use less. I find most recipes too sweet. You can cut no more than 25% of the total sugar. Removing more will affect the final product.


Hope this will help you.
 
2,550
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Joined Mar 13, 2001
I'm sure some of us can post suitable recipes for Melina. I have a great muffin recipe but my books are in storage. Next time I go there, I will find my book and share the recipe with you.



:lips:
 

isa

3,236
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Joined Apr 4, 2000
I have an extensive collection of muffin recipes, are you looking for something in particular?
 
42
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Joined Nov 6, 2001
Thanks for the advice.

I am not that maniac with fat and calories. I am participating in a Mayo Clinic's programe and I just want to taste some things first before proposing them to other people.

Dear WdeBorg, if I use canola oil I might skip some calories but I will loose my sister...
I prefer eating just a good piece of cake rather than 3 or 4 drier ones but there are people who suffer from health problems.
Proposing alternative ways of cooking is a nicer way to persuade them to change their life style.

Kimmie and Isa thank you so much for your help.

Melina

:)
 
1,640
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Joined Mar 6, 2001
I can understand your sisters passion for olive oil, perhaps us pastry chefs can convince her that although it's a great oil it's not a bakers oil. We use sweet fats (like butter or corn oils) in sweet products to compliment flavor. Savory fats work best in savory products. When you use savory fats like animal fats and olive oil it can over take the subtel flavors of flour, sugar and eggs.

Anyway, I can see the need for healthier recipes. I'm just trying to caution people who aren't very experienced bakers that making substitutions is not for beginners UNLESS you don't mind alot of trials going into the garbage can.

There are several baking references for people with dietary needs. Just at our local grocery stores there is a monthly magazine called "Cooking Light". I would suggest following their tried recipes. Why not benifit from some good scientic experience and not waste nor frustrate yourself along the way? Unless of course your into science and find food science projects more fun then eating your product.

I understand my point is "over kill" to you question. But it's amazing how many people don't understand that you can't make wide sweeping changes in baking recipes and have them work from one recipe to another.
 
1,389
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Joined Jul 24, 2001
Dear Wendy!

I couldn't agree more!
We cannot substitute everything ! It's better skip something from our diet than loosing the essence!


As for the olive oil. I agree it's not for every recipe, it's not suitable for baking.

But canola oil is a poison and that is a fact.

:)
 
2,550
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Joined Mar 13, 2001
Athenaeus,

I stopped using Canola a long time ago. I've been using grapeseed oil for my savory stuff :lips:
 
386
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Joined May 11, 2001
Canola oil is poison? Poor Canadian economy (as if it wasn't in bad enough shape) if more people find out. I haven't come across anything that says canola is poison. Anyone want to enlighten me?
 
2,550
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Joined Mar 13, 2001
Here are a few facts, Risa:

We've all been told at some time or another that canola is one of the healthiest oils on the market. Canola, which is an amalgam of the words “Canada” (whence it originated) and “oil,” is actually derived from the rapeseed, a member of the mustard family which is generally unfit for human consumption and was once more commonly used as a potent pesticide and lubricant, among other things. Chemically, canola breaks down at 5% saturated fat, 57% oleic acid, 23% omega-6, and 10-15% omega-3.

The reason canola is particularly unsuited for consumption is because it contains a very-long-chain fatty acid called erucic acid, which under some circumstances is associated with fibrotic heart lesions.

Sally Fallon, author of Nourishing Traditions, notes that the omega-3 fatty acids of processed canola oil are transformed during the deodorizing process into trans-fatty acids. She relates that one study indicated that “heart healthy” canola oil actually created a deficiency of vitamin E, which, as many of us know, is essential to our cardiovascular health. And on the practical side of things, canola isn't that good either. Because of its high sulphur content, it goes rancid easily, and baked goods used with the oil develop molds rather quickly. Healthfood store operators parrot the hype without checking any facts. Consumers search out various products with canola oil in them because they believe this is somehow much healthier than other oils. All foodgrade canola, including the varieties sold in healthfood stores, are deodorized from its natural terrible stink with 300 degree F. high-temperature refining. You cannot cook a vegetable oil at that temperature and leave behind anything much edible.

Research at the University of Florida- Gainsesville, determined that as much as 4.6% of all the fatty acids in canola are “trans” isomers (plastic) due to the refining process. Contrary to popular opinion, saturated fats, especially those found in coconut oil are not harmful to health, but are important nutrition. There are no trans- isomers in unrefined coconut butter, for example. This refers to many published research papers by Mary Enig, Ph.D. that refutes all the establishment propaganda condemning saturated fats.

In 1996, the Japanese announced a study wherein a special canola oil diet had actually killed laboratory animals. Reacting to this unpublished, but verified and startling information, a duplicate study was conducted by Canadian scientists using piglets and a canola oil based milk replacer diet.

In this second study published in Nutrition Research, 1997, v17, the researchers verified that canola oil somehow depleted the piglets of vitamin E to a dangerously low level.

In the abstract of the study, the Canadian researchers made the following remarkable statement: It is known that ingestion of oils containing polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) of the n-3 and n -6 series results in a high degree of unsaturation in membrane phospholipids, which in turn may increase lipid peroxidation, cholesterol oxidation, free radical accumulation and membrane damage. All very bad attributes.

That statement is remarkable because PUFA is considered essential to a healthy diet. Yet none of the above listed results of eating it may be considered healthy. So now we have something seemingly brand new to the dietary health arena.

Here the Canadians are condemning any oil that contains essential fatty acids. EFAs cannot stand heat. They turn rancid quickly. Proper processing, i.e., cold pressing, and protection from oxygen for storage is paramount with EFAs. Mainstream toxic commercial food making requires complete removal of EFAs lest shelf life disappear in smelly rancidity.

Absent the removal of EFAs, few manufactured toxic chemical foods would make it out of the warehouse. So, here we have Canadians telling us that their country's main oil export kills little animals. They suggest that perhaps it was the health giving EFAs left in the canola oil after it had been scorched at temperatures above 300 degrees farenheit to get rid of the EFAs. They don't tell you that whatever EFAs are left in the oil, are now poisonous rancid fats. It may be that the now toxic remnants are what's killing the vitamin E, and killing the little piggies. I think the Canadians produced that deceptive half truth to protect their careers from grant drought.

Firstly, the idea of something depleting vitamin E rapidly is an alarming development. Vitamin E is absolutely essential to human health, and when so much PUFA is available to diet as it is today, the demand evidently becomes even more imperative because tocopherols control the lipid peroxidation that results in dangerous free radical activity, which causes lesions in arteries and other problems.

Canola oil now has been shown to be a very heavy abuser of tocopherols or vitamin E, with the potential for rapidly depleting a body of the important vitamin. The researchers did not know what factors in the canola oil were responsible. They reported that other vegetable seed oils did not appear to cause the same problem in piglets.


Genetically Manipulated Canola
Seed Gets Loose In The Fields


Monsanto announced in April 1997, that it was recalling genetically engineered canola seed because an unapproved gene slipped into the batch by mistake. The canola seed had been genetically manipulated to resist the herbicide toxicity of Roundup, which is Monsanto's top money making product. The recall involved 60,000 bags containing two types of canola seed, which is enough to plant more than 700,000 acres. Both types of seed have the wrong gene in them. The genes in the recalled seed have not been approved for human consumption.

A spokesman for Limagrain Canada Seeds, which was selling the seeds under a Monsanto license, said that experts are trying to determine how the mistake occurred. We may never know how this happened he lamented.

The implications of this error are serious. No one in his right mind is unconcerned about genetic manipulations getting lost.

On January 26, 1998 Omega Nutrition, one of the major producers of organic, cold pressed oils for the health food store market published a press release. The release states that if you are cooking with canola oil of any quality, you might as well be using margarine. In the case of refined canola oil, the important health benefits have been processed away- leaving the consumer with the nutrition of say, white flour- and, dangerous trans-fatty acids have replaced a lot of the beneficial omega 3 essential fatty acids.

Oils high in omega 3 are not capable of taking high temperatures. Heating canola distorts the fatty acid turning it into an unnatural form of trans fatty acid that has been shown to be harmful to health.



:lips: I think not!
 
75
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Joined Oct 16, 2001
yes i would agree 100% about canola oil.i was working in a health food deli for a while and you would be amazed at the amout of people who do not consume canloa for one reason or another.
applesauce replacement is wonderful if you know what your doing. also if you choose applesauce please use an organic one from a trusted source,or make your own. baking with a reduced amount of fat always creates a drier product,one of the draw backs . however experimenting with fat alternatives as we will call them can be very rewarding.you just have to do your homework and then give it a whirl.researching some books on healty baking will give you plenty of ideas and lots of trial and error.barly malt,molasses,friut nectars,jams, jellys............
happy baking &healthy eating
 
1,640
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Joined Mar 6, 2001
o.k. I'm not exactly brilliant but whole cow (as harry would say) you lost me about....most of the time Kimmie! If canola is bad for you I don't want to eat it (And I do) so is there any chance you could dumb down your response? I'm trying to learn but that was way over my head.

P.S. The media sold me on conola, I can't tell you exactly what they said but in comparision testing no one mentioned anything close to what you just did Kimmie. They said it was the best of the fats to use. HELP? So is corn oil a better/safer product?

How come you all know about this?
 
750
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Joined Apr 30, 2001
According to snopes.com and some other urban legend sites, the canola oil is unsafe thing is just that, an urban legend.

Personally, I don't know. But check out snopes and it's documentation links and decide for yourselves.

canola oil
 
1,389
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Joined Jul 24, 2001
Let me straight something out!

I am not selling my olive oil in the States :)
I think that I sell it to the Italians in order that they present it as theirs. I am not sure because olive oil trade in Greece is a sad story...

So, I have no personal interest here and I consider people smart enough to take care of their health by their own!
But since we are in a forum and we suppose to exchange ideas this is what I think.

Rape seed is a genetically modified seed. Is that enough to persuade you that canola oil is not exactly the healthiest oil on the earth?

If it's not start reading the first two paragraphs of Kimmies message.
Since I am not exactly brilliant either, I tried to pick up some points that help to understand her point of view.

1. "All foodgrade canola, are deodorized from its natural terrible stink with 300 degree F. high-temperature refining. You cannot cook a vegetable oil at that temperature and leave behind anything much edible"

If this is still not enough

2 "Research at the University of Florida- Gainsesville, determined that as much as 4.6% of all the fatty acids in canola are “trans” isomers (plastic) due to the refining process".

3. "In 1996, the Japanese announced a study wherein a special canola oil diet had actually killed laboratory animals"

4. "In this second study published in Nutrition Research, 1997, v17, the researchers verified that canola oil somehow depleted the piglets of vitamin E to a dangerously low level ". "Firstly, the idea of something depleting vitamin E rapidly is an alarming "

5. "Monsanto announced in April 1997, that it was recalling genetically engineered canola seed because an unapproved gene slipped into the batch by mistake."

6."On January 26, 1998 Omega Nutrition, one of the major producers of organic, cold pressed oils for the health food store market published a press release. The release states that if you are cooking with canola oil of any quality, you might as well be using margarine. "

7. "In the case of refined canola oil, the important health benefits have been processed away- leaving the consumer with the nutrition of say, white flour- and, dangerous trans-fatty acids have replaced a lot of the beneficial omega 3 essential fatty acids".

8."Oils high in omega 3 are not capable of taking high temperatures. Heating canola distorts the fatty acid turning it into an unnatural form of trans fatty acid that has been shown to be harmful to health".

All these do not sound as an urban legend to me.



I think that sunflower oil is a not a bad oil but I do not know if it is not as good in baking as canola because as Kimmie's information mention, canola is geving better shape to doughts. I didn't know that!

I hope that this was of some help.

:)
 
205
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Joined Jun 1, 2001
Returning from the brilliant yellow of the canola fields to the original topic...

First, everyone does not know that applesauce is necessarily the BEST replacement for fats, because it isn't always.

Many sorts of fruit and vegetable purees can be used to supplement or replace fats. Prune puree works very, very well in anything chocolate. Squash or pumpkin puree can also work well, as can pureed dried dates, or canned pears, or babyfood carrots, or mangos, or bananas (very good indeed, although they tend to give a banana flavour). Applesauce is blander, true, but it does tend to give the driest results. Choosing fruit based on other flavours of the cake is a better strategy.

Low-fat or nonfat buttermilk or yogourt is excellent as well, particularly in things that are supposed to resemble scones or biscuits as well as in many cake recipes; it produces a nice tenderness. Cottage or Quark cheese can also be used in many instances; it gives good results mixed with a tiny bit of butter - I've used a tablespoon in some recipes, creamed or cut with nonfat dry cottage cheese, and got good stuff.

Other techniques for increasing tenderness and moistness include replacing part of the flour called for with pastry flour if all-purpose. I've also used oat flour (no more than a quarter total) in many cake recipes, which does a lot to counter the dryness.

Dryness, actually, is more often caused by overbaking, or overmixing. Lowfat recipes usually need to be mixed like pancakes - just until combined - and baked to a point that in a regular recipe, might be considered just a smidge underdone.

In cookie recipes, brown rice syrup, oddly enough, is very good. You can find some lowfat cookie recipes using corn syrup and/or molasses; subbing some or all brown rice syrup makes the cookies crisper (anything like a crisp nonfat cookie is often difficult; most recipes are more like little cakes. Which is fine, you know, but sometimes you want something that ISN'T a meringue with a little bit of crunch.)

Pureed silken tofu (the kind in aseptic boxes) can also be used. Like cottage cheese, it tends to work very well in recipes that normally call for creamed butter; one creams a very small amount of butter with tofu blended perfectly smooth.

About sugar: if you're working with published low-fat recipes, they are almost always MUCH MUCH too sweet. Most authors seem to compensate for dropping the fat by increasing the sugar; I find it unnecessary, and usually reduce the sugar by at least 1/3. (I was raised by a European mother, and I'm not much for really sweet things.)

A few references for lowfat baking:
Sandra Woodruff: Secrets of Fat-Free Baking (recipes are much of a muchness, but plenty of tips on using fruit purees and other fat replacers, and converting existing recipes.)
Alice Medrich: Chocolate and the Art of Low Fat Desserts (wonderful)
Patty Neeley: Sweet Deceptions (good if you want something really junky; she uses a lot of nonfat creamer in her recipes, though)
Susan Purdy: Have Your Cake and Eat It Too (she doesn't reduce fat as much as I would, but a good, moderate starting point)
Rose Reisman: Divine Indulgences (again, quite moderate. Some interesting stuff here, including Passover-friendly desserts and a chapter on Soy Sweets.)

Cooking Light has a website at www.cookinglight.com
Sarah Phillips (author of The Healthy Oven Baking Book, which is out of print, but good if you can find it) has a baking website at http://www.cooking911.com/index.htm which includes a lot of her low-fat baking pointers.
If you want to go all out, check out the searchable archives at www.fatfree.com
This is a huge compilation of recipes from the Fat Free mailing list, including a plethora of desserts. The recipes here are also vegetarian, and often vegan.

There are also a lot of other good low-fat baking resources online. A quick Google search will turn up a pile for you.
 
386
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Joined May 11, 2001
Sorry for opening a can of worms. I really didn't know the bad things about canola oil. Thanks for the info. It made me examine canola oil more closely. I read the FDA document on it and yes it does contain erucic acid but only 0.3 to 1.2%. Before 1971, it contained up to 60% which would definitely be not too good for you. I found a good site that seemed unbiased: Canola: Truth or Fiction. I know from my days as a botany student that rapeseed used for canola was produced via traditional breeding techniques and not genetic modification. That was over 5 years ago, but I doubt genetically modified varieties have proliferated. In any case, I tend to use different oils for whatever I'm cooking and I use small amounts, so I'm not too worried for the little bit of canola oil that I do use. It usually takes me 3 months or so to finish the smallest bottles at the grocery store.

I agree with CompassRose. Alice Medrich's Chocolate and the Art of Low Fat Desserts is a great book. The recipes do not produce anything that could be called health food, but each recipe does have less than 30% fat. Another baking book I like is the Eating Well Dessert Cookbook. The recipes generally use fruit purees, buttermilk or yogurt with a couple of tablespoons of oil.
 
1,640
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Joined Mar 6, 2001
What an incredible amount of knowledge you've accumulated CompassRose! I will print out your recommendations just incase someone asks for these types of products from me in the future. Thank-you!
 
1,389
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Joined Jul 24, 2001
Dear Risa!

No you didn't open the can of worms, or if you did this what we suppose to do in discussion forums! :)

Dear Wendy.
Before starting replying to you about what I am thinking of the article that Nancy posted, I possed my self this simple question:
if I had to choose between the 2$ olive poison that Italians sell as olive oil and the canola oil what would I choose.

After thinking for a while I would choose the Italian crap.Only because I am used in consuming olive oil.That's all and I am honest to you.

Of course the fact the canola oil is produced by genetically modified seeds influenced my decision.
Genetical modifications is something very serious. Is not as choosing another brand's hard disk for your pc.

On the other hand I have friends in NY that they boast that they spend money for their health and they buy organic olive oil and in the same time they are having 10 donuts for breakfast...

I think that in food, prejudice and habbit play a very important role. Education plays it's role also but we have to change level first.

As I hate vegeterians who try to persuade us that we have to pasture in order to stay healthy I hate those who say "eat olive oil unless you want to die". I do not belong to those people :)
As long as we have access to reliable information ( and allow me here to remark that articles in newspapers are not SO reliable ) we have the right to make our own decisions.

I just want to ask my sister who is participating in Educational programes about Nutrition and she has started her campaign for the elimination of fat with the substitution of olive oil, if she would drink every day a table spoon of canola because she is drinking olive oil every morning to keep her skin healthy...

And since she is preparing some olive oil based homemade cosmetics for her hair and skin , if she would use canola even on her hair...

I think that if you use it for preparing your cookies you can use it for your hair :)

Last by not least I want to thank CompassRose for this excellent post. It's amazing who many things you learn around here!!

:)
 
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