Baking sprouted bread ?

Discussion in 'Pastries & Baking' started by zony, Mar 2, 2017.

  1. zony

    zony

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    Hi

    I wonder if anyone has figured out how to bake bread with grains that has been sprouted 3-5 days.
    When I try this the bread gets soggy
    Is there a way to avoid sogginess?
     
  2. norcalbaker59

    norcalbaker59 Banned

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    Are you dehydrating, grinding into flour?
     
  3. norcalbaker59

    norcalbaker59 Banned

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    Assuming you are grinding into flour and not adding to dough chopped...

    If over-germinated, more than 1/8", it could be a starch to gluten problem. We always talk about protein (gluten) in baking, but forget that protein is a very small portion of the grain. The rest are starches. Starches convert to sugars; then to simple sugars. In bread, or any yeast dough, simple sugars feed yeast, and that results in fermentation.

    There has to be a balance of starch to gluten. Sprouted grains lose some gluten. Less gluten results in a denser, moister bread. So the trick is to catch the sprouts before too much gluten is lost. You have to experiment to find the sweet spot.

    So if your recipe states to sprout grains until 1/2", try 1/8", then 1/4".

    If gluten is not an issue for you, you can try adding 1 tablespoon of vital gluten. Vital gluten is wheat that has had most of the starch removed. Stores like Whole Foods stocks it (Bob's Red Mill brand).

    Another option is to use commercially produced sprouted grain flour.

    Or a bit of diastatic malt powder. Diastatic malt contains an enzyme that breaks down the starches, making it easier for yeast to feed. The result is a stronger, higher rise. If you look at the ingredients of Ezekiel Bread, you'll see malted barley (diastatic) and wheat gluten (vital gluten). If you use diastatic malt powder, make sure it's not non-diastatic. Non-diastatic malt powder does not contain the enzyme to break down the starch. It's use to flavor and brown baked goods.
     
  4. zony

    zony

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    Thanx for your response!

    The reason I want 3-5 days old sprouted grains is that many studies show phytonutrients peek at this 'age'.

    I realize longer sprouting is making my baking much harder since it reduces both gluten and complex carbohydrates,

    especially since  I'm trying to make a danish rye bread and rye grains have poor gluten content from start.

    The dough does not raise during fermentation/baking, there is poor absorption of water during baking and the crust gets easily burned.

    I've also tried to make muffins by adding baking powder. The muffin would not raise during baking and texture was like porridge but less soggy than when baking bread from same dough.

    Yesterday I used dough to bake crackers at low temperature and the result was great. They´re tasty, sweet and very crisp.

    I will definitely try adding gluten to see if that will help baking process. Perhaps it would be better to make a smaller bread to ensure better evaporation and lower baking temperature to avoid fast crust formation.
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2017
  5. norcalbaker59

    norcalbaker59 Banned

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    Zony
    You may find Peter Reinhart's Bread Revolution World-Class Baking with Sprouted and Whole Grains, Heirloom Flours, and Fresh Techniques helpful in your work with sprouted grains.

    His recipes use starter rather than yeast. Most bread baker's believe starter produces a better loaf and is more easily digested than bread made with commercial yeast.

    Just a word of warning, there's a typo on page 63. He posted correction on his Facebook page.

    I think blending sprouted grain flours will give you better results, while still providing the level of nutrients you wish to achieve.