Baked Whole Chicken Recipe Question

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by marinecorps98, Jun 28, 2002.

  1. marinecorps98

    marinecorps98

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    I love eating chicken and I am always looking for new ways to cook them and flavor them. Does anyone have a good recipe for a spicy whole chicken. I've tried everything from brining to cooking with beer to using a variety of spices using a vertical rack.

    thank you

    marinecorps98
     
  2. cape chef

    cape chef

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  3. chiffonade

    chiffonade

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    Mix up a blend of your favorite spices and include Kosher Salt. For instance, a blend I might throw together would be:

    Salt
    Cumin
    Chile Powder
    Oregano
    Cayenne Pepper
    Garlic Powder (I use this infrequently but it would work here)

    Rub this all over the outside of the chicken, and get your hand under the skin of the chicken and rub some directly on the meat. Sprinkle some inside as well. You can do this with Italian Seasonings, Greek, etc. Roast the chix as usual and the aroma will fill the house.

    Alternatively, you can make a paste of garlic, fresh herbs, salt, pepper and olive oil and push it under the skin, then roast as usual.
     
  4. tdcman1

    tdcman1

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  5. cmj

    cmj

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    have you ever tried poulet de bresse?
    if not do so .
    also check out simon hopkinson`s books "roast chicken and other stories" and "roast chicken and other stories second helping`s"

    he is an english guy famed for cooking at bibendum,sir terence conran`s first important restaurant in london.his book`s are a joy to read and truly insparational.
     
  6. britcook

    britcook

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    Poulet de Bresse is a breed of chicken from France with its own appellation controlee , particularly noted for its flavour (and blue feet!). When a British supermarket chain (Tesco) imported these a few years back they ran a series of adverts featuring Dudley Moore chasing all over France looking for the perfect chicken.
    Fairly rare outside France they will probably cost at least twice as much as a decent free range chicken. It is highly unlikely that they are exported outside Europe, certainly not to the US or Canada.
    I agree with the verdict on Simon Hopkinson but sadly all his books are currently out of print in the US.
     
  7. nicko

    nicko Founder of Cheftalk.com Staff Member

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    I have yet to see Poulet de Bresse in the states. I have seen some chickens raised in the same fashion (diet etc), but nothing actually from Bresse France. It would be very very expensive.

    My favorite way to prepare a whole roast chicken is to get several large chickens (I like capons) and I season the inside cavity with salt and pepper, and I place a 1/4 stick of butter inside with a 1/4 of a small onion and a few garlic cloves. Season the outside with salt and pepper and then I place the chicken on a spit and roast them very slowly over coals. The center of the spit is lined with aluminum foil and I put some potatoes in the center and let the basting juices of the chicken drip onto the potatoes.

    Get a good bottle of wine, a nice loaf of crusty bread and you are all set.

    Freddy Giradet does an excellent version of roast chicken by putting black truffle slices underneath the skin near the breast meat.

    (In keeping with the topic, if you don't have a spit you can also achieve a similar quality using your oven. :) )
     
  8. armand

    armand

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    @ Chiffonade:

    Sorry about my late jumping in but what is kosher salt?

    It´s a mineral, so how can it be kosher (or not)?

    Armand
     
  9. daveb

    daveb

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    You're right. There are no laws of Kashrut governing salt. The stuff should really be called Koshering (or Kashering) Salt. It is used in the process of salting and soaking meat to make it fit for consumption (kosher).

    Other than the coarse grind, there is nothing special about it.

    :confused:
     
  10. nicko

    nicko Founder of Cheftalk.com Staff Member

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    Might be good to start a new topic on Kosher salt (if there isn't already one).
     
  11. mudbug

    mudbug

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    Nicko,

    There's one on kosher salt here.