Baby ginger!

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Joined Apr 25, 2014
So I was at a garlic festival...  I picked up 3 varieties of hardnecks, but also I found this gem:


Being Asian, I have lots of uses for ginger, but what would y'all do with it?  Something that really benefits from not being woody or fibrous?
 
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Joined Sep 3, 2015
Ooh, I love baby ginger! Its quite nice when finely julienned in a green papaya salad, also pickles very nicely, has a good snap to it, I sometimes replace daikon with it when I'm feeling adventurous... Made a fresh salad of broccoli stem and baby ginger matchsticks among other ingredients and that worked well too. 

I've had ceviche where they used ginger juice instead of lime, wasn't really that into it but then tried making it myself with baby ginger juice and that was much more palatable for me.

What are you thinking of doing with it?
 
2,563
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Joined Apr 25, 2014
I like to grate it because it is not fibrous.  Some going into kimchi and some going into kombucha.  Any leftover is going into stir fry :D
 
2,563
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Joined Apr 25, 2014
One reason they harvest immature ginger up here is that it's not the right climate to grow ginger at all.  Too cold, too dry.  The only US state suitable is Hawaii.  To grow ginger requires 50-90 degrees soil temp which means the Northeast is horribly bad.  It requires some indoor growing, then moving them outside.  Even then, you're lucky if they survive until October. 

I would guess that all ginger on the east coast gets harvested by september because that's when they are biggest without being dead.
 
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Joined May 7, 2012
One reason they harvest immature ginger up here is that it's not the right climate to grow ginger at all.  Too cold, too dry.  The only US state suitable is Hawaii.  To grow ginger requires 50-90 degrees soil temp which means the Northeast is horribly bad.  It requires some indoor growing, then moving them outside.  Even then, you're lucky if they survive until October. 

I would guess that all ginger on the east coast gets harvested by september because that's when they are biggest without being dead.
I just got a bunch of this too. If you're into home brewing at all it makes a wonderful gingerbeer. I add 10 pounds to a 10 gallon batch of white ale, then I use it for Moscow mules.
 
4,474
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Joined Jun 27, 2012
 
One reason they harvest immature ginger up here is that it's not the right climate to grow ginger at all.  Too cold, too dry.  The only US state suitable is Hawaii.  To grow ginger requires 50-90 degrees soil temp which means the Northeast is horribly bad.  It requires some indoor growing, then moving them outside.  Even then, you're lucky if they survive until October. 

I would guess that all ginger on the east coast gets harvested by september because that's when they are biggest without being dead.
I just got a bunch of this too. If you're into home brewing at all it makes a wonderful gingerbeer. I add 10 pounds to a 10 gallon batch of white ale, then I use it for Moscow mules.
I think it is cute that the MMs are back.... I had to make it exactly once during my whole bartending career (thanks Mr Boston lol ;-)

Back OT.... how about a ginger simple syrup?

When you get down to the scraps toss them into some boiling water (and sugar of course).... then lower to a simmer until you think you have all the gingeryness out..cool and then decant into an airtight glass container....unless you want everything to smell of ginger ;-)

Use a few drops here and there to moisten a spicy sponge or a trifle (I've been pushing trifle lately...maybe I should whip one up soon lol).

Another way to sneak just about any flavor into something is by infusion.

In this case I am infusing the ginger into water to make delish and fun to eat marshmallows.

Just plop the ginger leftovers into the water called for...bring to a boil, allow to cool,strain, and proceed upon your merry way!

There are a zillion ways to make (and use) this favorite childhood treat but having recently fallen in love with this site thought I would share their's for the soft and pillowy childhood treat.

http://www.cookingforengineers.com/recipe/106/Marshmallows/

Cheers!

mimi
 
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4,474
421
Joined Jun 27, 2012
 
 
One reason they harvest immature ginger up here is that it's not the right climate to grow ginger at all.  Too cold, too dry.  The only US state suitable is Hawaii.  To grow ginger requires 50-90 degrees soil temp which means the Northeast is horribly bad.  It requires some indoor growing, then moving them outside.  Even then, you're lucky if they survive until October. 

I would guess that all ginger on the east coast gets harvested by september because that's when they are biggest without being dead.
I just got a bunch of this too. If you're into home brewing at all it makes a wonderful gingerbeer. I add 10 pounds to a 10 gallon batch of white ale, then I use it for Moscow mules.
I think it is cute that the MMs are back.... I had to make it exactly once during my whole bartending career (thanks Mr Boston lol ;-)

Back OT.... how about a ginger simple syrup?

When you get down to the scraps toss them into some boiling water (and sugar of course).... then lower to a simmer until you think you have all the gingeryness out..cool and then decant into an airtight glass container....unless you want everything to smell of ginger ;-)

Use a few drops here and there to moisten a spicy sponge or a trifle (I've been pushing trifle lately...maybe I should whip one up soon lol).

Another way to sneak just about any flavor into something is by infusion.

In this case I am infusing the ginger into water to make delish and fun to eat marshmallows.

Just plop the ginger leftovers into the water called for...bring to a boil, allow to cool,strain, and proceed upon your merry way!

There are a zillion ways to make (and use) this favorite childhood treat but having recently fallen in love with this site thought I would share their's....

http://www.cookingforengineers.com/recipe/106/Marshmallows/

Cheers!

mimi
 
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Joined Nov 15, 2012
Hey millions, how do you make one of those nice thick Kombucha mats like you get in the mail.  Mine would just grow thin sheets on the surface, and when I tossed the original mat (they'd all sink eventually) I just had junk from there on.

Rick
 
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