Authentic New Orleans black bean soup with cilantro cream

140
16
Joined Aug 17, 2011
Hi,

This recipe I didn't get from my family.  It comes from Carol L Kirkland of Mandeville and is a family favourite.  I found this recipe in a post-hurricane Katrina New Orlean's cook book entitled, "Cooking up a Storm", presented by The Times-Picayune and edited by Marcelle Bienvenu and Judy Walker.  "As residents started to rebuild their lives, The Time-Picayune of New Orleans became a post hurricane swapping place for old recipes that were washed away in the storm.  Marcelle Bienvenu and Judy Wlaker have compiled more than 225 of these delicious, authentic recipes along with the stories of how they came to be and waht they mean tot those who have searched so hard to find them again.  Culled from the archives of the nwspaper, readers, and chefs, and local restaurants, these ricpes represent the very best of classic and contemporary New Orleans cuisine, from appetizers, soups, and salads to entrees, casseroles, and desserts...."   

Its a great cook book.  Carol's bean soup and cilantro cream is a very taste combination of flavors and textures, doesn't take long to fix, with the spiciness of the soup cooled by the cilantro cream.  I've made this soup several times since I've discovered this recipe.  Its a good home cooked meal.  I'd be interested in anyone's idea's of improving the dish, as good as it is.  It calls for canned black beans, and having never cooked black beans from scratch, I wonder how it would differ with the beans cooked that way.   The recipe states 'makes four servings', but I've only made the recipe doubled or trippled, and it doesn't feel like 8-12 servings.  Big bowls, I guess. 

Carol's recipe:

(makes 4 servings)

4 slices of bacon, chopped

1/2 cup of chopped onions (okay, I cheated and have added extra onions and bacon)

1/2 cup chopped sun-dried tomatoes (reconstituted, and I've used the juice in the soup.  good stuff)

1 (15 oz) can black bean, drained and rinsed!

1 (14 oz) can chicken broth

1 large clove of garlic

1/2 teaspoon ground cumin

1/4 teaspoon of hot sauce (I used Louisianna hot sauce, and it was perfect).

1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro

Cilantro cream:

1/4 cup sour cream

1 tablespoon chopped fresh cilantro (I use more than called for)

1 teaspoon ground coriander

Directions:

Cook the bacon and onion in a large heavy pot over medium heat until the onion is tender (I've always used olive oil, but is there a technique that sears the bacon and uses the fat for the onions?).  Drain off the excess fat.

Add the tomatoes, beans, chicken broth, garlic, cumin, and hot sauce.  Bring the mixture to a boil over high heat.  Reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer for 5 minutes.

Remove from the heat and add the cilantro leaves.  Puree the mixture in a blender and return to the pot, or use an immersion blender to puree it in the pot.  (I don't use either choices--to messy with immersion blender and I don't possess the other;  potatoe masher workes just fine).  Keep warm.

For the Cilantro Cream:  Combine the sour cream, cilantro and coriander in a small bowl and wisk to blend.

Serve soup in bowls drizzled with the Cilantro Cream.

I love this recipe.  Thank you Carol and "Cooking up a Storm".  I was told from the friend who purchased this book in New Orleans that the proceeds went to survivors.
 
Last edited:
140
16
Joined Aug 17, 2011
Lol.  Sounds like it. :)  So tell me;  is home made chicken stock any different than water and chicken drippings after cooking a chicken?  I mean; do people change it in any way, like adding spices or herbs to the stock while the chicken is cooking?  Yes;  I am that ignorant!  :) ........In other words, is it the 'freshness' that makes home made chicken stock good, or something else?
 
Last edited:
273
21
Joined Jul 11, 2011
Well, typical chicken stock recipes use mirepoix, in addition to the chicken, and then aromatic herbs of some variety.  Mirepoix is a combination of chopped carrots, celery and onions used to add flavor and aroma to stocks. The usual proportions (by weight) for making mirepoix are:
  • 50% onions
  • 25% carrots
  • 25% celery
Frequently used herbs include parsley, thyme and bay leaf.  If you are making a Chinese chicken stock, you would also add fresh ginger root.
 
3,401
162
Joined Sep 18, 2008
Um, if I read you correctly, I think we have a small communication gap.

Chicken stock is not made as part of cooking a chicken.

Chicken stock is made, IMHO, by slowly simmering chicken bones, raw for white stock, roasted for brown stock, for several hours, then adding mirepoix (2:1:1 mix of onions, celery, and a root vegetable to replace carrot) and continue to simmer, then strain and defat, clarify if desired.

Now you have a foundation to use to create
 
3,159
622
Joined May 5, 2010
You would not be surprised....I'm sure.....but there are many people out there who use the gelled drippings of baked chicken to make a stock. I even know a few "chefs' who do that.  :)
 
140
16
Joined Aug 17, 2011
Wow.   Never knew the process was like that.  Here are a few questions....and thank you all for your responses....

1) With the raw:  is it difficult to separate the meat from the bone?  Think I might find a video of that on line?  Those video's have been very helpful to me.

2) The white and the brown.....makes white and brown chicken gravy (amongst other things)? 

3) So, home made chicken stock is nothing like canned chicken broth.  Correct?

4) When you sit down to a meal cooked by others, can you tell if they used chicken stock or store bought chicken broth?

5) When you make the stock, how large a batch do you typically make? (I understand you may have been doing this commercially for a large restaurant).

6) Can it be frozen, or is that not recommended?  What is the best way to preserve it?  How long is it good for?

Thanks guys;  I had no clue.  Sound's delicious
 
3,401
162
Joined Sep 18, 2008
Wow.   Never knew the process was like that.  Here are a few questions....and thank you all for your responses....

1) With the raw:  is it difficult to separate the meat from the bone?  Think I might find a video of that on line?  Those video's have been very helpful to me.
Yes and no /img/vbsmilies/smilies/crazy.gif, Google "deboning a chicken", here's one example of a step by step process
2) The white and the brown.....makes white and brown chicken gravy (amongst other things)? 
Um, sort of, they have different flavors and applications
3) So, home made chicken stock is nothing like canned chicken broth.  Correct?
Well, first, many differentiate between stock and broth and the discussions can become long and convoluted. Making chicken stock from scratch certainly allows control of what is in the stock while canned stock or broth generally contains salt and, probably, preservatives. They both are made from chicken but the process varies.
4) When you sit down to a meal cooked by others, can you tell if they used chicken stock or store bought chicken broth?
That depends on too many factors for a definitive answer. I like to think I can, but then again...
5) When you make the stock, how large a batch do you typically make? (I understand you may have been doing this commercially for a large restaurant).
Probably 4-6 quarts for home use.
6) Can it be frozen, or is that not recommended?  What is the best way to preserve it?  How long is it good for?

Yes, it can be frozen
 
Top Bottom