Authentic German food ideas

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by ACH10BRG, Oct 31, 2017.

  1. ACH10BRG

    ACH10BRG

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    Hello all,

    I'm new to the forum but looking for someone that may have some knowledge in authentic German cuisne.
    I am the owner and chef of a food truck and I'm looking to add some new recipes to the menu. Any help is appreciated.
     
  2. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    I've enjoyed this book.

    Link is acting wonky.
    New German Cooking: Recipes for Classics Revisited.
     
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  3. chefbuba

    chefbuba

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    We also have a member from Germany. @recky I believe.
     
  4. ACH10BRG

    ACH10BRG

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    Awesome guys! thanks for the help.
     
  5. recky

    recky

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    Hi ACH10BRG,

    as chefbuba rightly points out, I'm based in Germany and run a small country restaurant specialising in regional cuisine with a bit of a twist.
    (Strangely, I was not notified by the forum about being contacted by you. I'm sorry about the delay!)

    German cuisine, well... The caveat is that there is no one German cuisine. What is now Germany was made up of countless kingdoms, duchies, regions. Each region has its own distinct specialities, the variations of sausage alone must be in the high thousands. In my region, the Eifel mountains, bordering on Belgium, we have dishes that people 20 miles down the road have never heard of.
    Having said that, however, in the States it would probably make sense to use less obscure recipes and try your hand at a few classics. I have been developing some German food truck ideas myself for some time, but I don't think I'll ever get around to using them. Therefore I don't mind sharing. I actually think it's a good idea to start a German food truck in the States. A lot of our stuff is comfort food which is what a lot of people love. It's a bit off the beaten path, too. It can be prepared in advance and it holds well.

    If I were to start a German food truck I'd look at roasts to start with. I would consider specialising in roasts only: sauerbraten (beef marinated in vinegar), spiessbraten (originally a stuffed pork roast on a skewer - I would import a spiessbratengrill from Germany for that!), krustenbraten (pork roast with crispy skin), all accompanied by rotkohl (stewed red cabbage with apple and spices) and homemade klösse (dumplings). All roasts come with their highly aromatic brown sauces. As an alternative I would offer bratwurst on sauerkraut/mash with German mustard. You will definitely require a good (German) butcher for all this, as US meat cuts are often quite different from those over here. Ours are more like French cuts, so a French butcher might be an option, too, or perhaps a Polish one.

    For recipes you could do worse than turning to Mimi Sheraton's "The German Cookbook", probably the best and most comprehensive German recipe collection in English out there.

    Let me know what you think and how you get on. If you have any questions, you can mail me at [email protected].

    Cheers,
    Recky
     
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  6. seabeecook

    seabeecook

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    Hello @recky : How do you prepare braised red cabbage? If I'm correct, it's called rotkraut or rotkohl (red cabbage) in northern Germany and blaukraut (blue cabbage) in the south. (Don't hold me to those terms as I don't speak German!) My great grandmother, born in Saxony in 1880, taught my mother to make it when she married my dad in the early 1950s.

    I prepare my "German" red cabbage with bacon, onion, tart green apple, apple cider, cider vinegar, cloves and salt and pepper. I've had it at a local restaurant in my county in California, but it rather bland with an overwhelming clove flavor. Other than my sister's cabbage, I rarely see it unless I cook it. And whenever I do cook it, I always receive requests for the recipe!

    Thanks,

    Steven
     
  7. recky

    recky

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    Hi Steven,
    your recipe sounds just about right. In my region, many home cooks also add a citric component, usually orange juice or peel. I know an old lady who cooks the red cabbage in glühwein (mulled red wine), as it pretty much contains everything you need, i.e. spices such as clove and star anise, red wine and orange. We don't get cider vinegar over here, so most cooks will use red wine vinegar. It is not meant to be a sour dish, however, so go easy on the vinegar - use it more like a condiment. Traditionally, people used to use their smoked green bacon (i.e. lardo) for sweating off the onions.
    Cheers,
    Recky
     
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  8. seabeecook

    seabeecook

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    Thank you Recky. Your point about sour ingredients is well taken. I have learned over the years to moderate my use of vinegar. I find that a modest amount of vinegar, balanced with the sweetness from the apple and cider, yields a wonderful dish that many enjoy.
     
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  9. Jain Daugh

    Jain Daugh

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    I am not a native German, but have been to Germany a few times. It inspired me to develop the traditional dishes I enjoyed in Germany to my California kitchen. I use my pressure cooker to make sauerbraten, rouladen (beef rolls) and red cabbage. I get the taste I like without hours of marinating and slow cooking.

    I also make spaetzle which is fresh mini-dumplings that make an easy side dish. I bought a dollar store plastic colander with handle, drilled the holes to be 1/4" and it works great to make the mini-dumplings. (otherwise it was an expensive and specialty spaetzle maker device) My spaetzle are gluten free and are just as tasty as those I enjoyed in Germany. The beauty of spaetzle is that you make these and reheat (light browning with butter) when you want to serve them. I originally found a You Tube video that quickly showed me how to make these.

    Now you have me hungry for a hardy winter dinner of rib sticking German eating.
     
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  10. Jain Daugh

    Jain Daugh

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    I used red wine vinegar when I make red cabbage too! I tend to like a bit more of a sweet-sour taste which is just my preference.