AUGUST 2021 CHALLENGE - BRITISH COOKERY

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Joined Jan 8, 2010
… almost halfway through the month. I’m sipping tea. Care to join me? View attachment 70689
I would join you, but due to the time difference, I'll change beverages:
IMG_20210803_142317.jpg

Not my favourite, but the one I got on hand ;)
I prefer Glenmorangie!
I've been to the Glenlivit distillery in Scotland years ago.
Apparently, you drink your whisky with just a bit of water, to open the taste.
Preferebly with the water used for making the whisky. No ice.
 
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Joined Jul 13, 2012
I have leftover chicken breasts from Sunday so being an overcast gloomy day I made a pot pie today. It was quite delicious and I remembered to take a picture - yay.

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Joined Oct 23, 2008
Fish and Chips!
This is a dish I've been wanting to make for a while. Growing up in Florida this was a staple available at many restaurants. Often times around here the fish will be mahi mahi, grouper, snapper, etc. Traditionally I believe haddock is the fish of choice for fish and chips. I also picked up some "London Pub" malt vinegar as that is a necessity! Hand cut chips .. I blanch fried them at 275 and then did the second fry at around 375. They did not turn out as well as I had hoped but I had some trouble keeping them temp up. Tarter sauce made with mayonnaise, dill relish, chopped capers, dried dill, and a little lemon juice.

fishandchips.jpg
 
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Joined Oct 23, 2008
Good morning. You alright?
I'm sticking with what I know to be "famous" British dishes myself. I've never actually made a full English breakfast but the fact that there are beans served with it always intrigued me. I originally wasn't going to make it since I thought that blood pudding was a requirement. After a little reading it's not always included and is somewhat regional. So here's my sunny side up eggs, broiled tomato and baby portabellas, beans, bacon, sausage, and fry bread.

englishbreakfast.jpg
 
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Joined Jan 8, 2010
Makes me hungry (just woken up).
I'm still waiting for someone to post the Scottish delicacy of deep fried mars bar :) :)
 
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Joined Sep 21, 2010
The Nanaimo Bar, the quintessential dessert square of BRITISH Columbia, served in every coffee shop, potluck, bbq, fundraiser, wedding, funeral, lunchbox.

The recipe first appeared in Nanaimo, a city on Vancouver Island, reached by ferry via the terminal near me.

There are strict rules about what is and what is not a Nanaimo Bar. When Canada made a stamp to honour the Nanaimo bar, they got the proportions all wrong, as did NY Times Cooking. Canadians were in an uproar about it. So to clarify —

The Nanaimo Bar has 3 layers:
1. Base - . Graham Crackers/cocoa/coconut. Walnuts/pecans are allowed.
2. Middle - BIrd’s Custard/Icing Sugar/Butter. Not too thick a layer, the same thickness as the base is preferred. It’s ok to add flavours like cappuccino, peanut butter, mint. But - Bird’s Custard Powder is essential.
3. Top - Thin layer of melted chocolate (70% callebaut here) & a tablespoon of butter. 55% to 70% chocolate balances out the sweet middle. Not white chocolate, that would be wrong. Very wrong.

Essential ingredients: Graham Crackers, Bird's Custard Powder, Butter, Coconut, and -- good Chocolate and Cocoa. Other ingredients, not pictured, are sugar, icing sugar, egg. I used salted butter, so no salt was added.
nan1.jpg
First, make the base.
People usually bake it but it’s too hot to use the oven today and I actually prefer to cook the beaten egg/sugar/butter in a double boiler and add it to the crumbs/coconut/cocoa. It gives the base a better texture, not dry or crumbly, which can happen when baking,

Melt 1/2 butter and 1/4 cup sugar in your vintage double boiler. While it's melting, beat one egg. Don't make it frothy, just beat it. The egg will be tempered then added to the hot butter/sugar.
nan6.jpg
Stir the tempered egg with the butter until slightly thickened. Not too thick. Then add to the crumbs and coconut.
nan7.jpg
Oops! I forgot to add the cocoa! Taking pictures distracted me. Add cocoa and vanilla. Don't forget. The Nanaimo Bar is never blonde.


nan9.jpg Put it into the greased 9” pan and smooth it out. I love the mini-roller for this job. Put it in the fridge for 15 minutes.

Next, make the middle.
Bird's Custard Powder, butter and icing sugar are the essential ingredients. You could add a flavour, like cappuccino, mint, peanut butter, scotch. But. It is perfect as-is. Scotch is pretty good, though.
nan11.jpg
Cream the butter, Bird’s, icing sugar. Use your vintage wooden spoon, or your old mixmaster. Think of the 1950s kitchen.
It doesn't have to be perfectly smooth, and never fluffy.
nan14.jpg
Once it's creamed, try to spread it evenly on the base. This is the most difficult part for me, I’m no pastry chef. If anyone has tips on how to spread it evenly, please tell me!

Now, make the top layer.
Melt chocolate in the double boiler, add butter. When melted, pour it over the middle layer. I think I should have put the pan in the fridge before this step, but it will be ok. I ended up having to use the offset spatula because the chocolate started to set.
nan16.jpg
Done! Back in the fridge until it chills enough to cut.

The Nanaimo Bar
nan_done..jpg
Again, I am clearly not a pastry chef, it’s a bit messy but it still tastes exactly right!
 
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Joined Sep 21, 2010
I don't really care for sweets.. but that... that looks like something I'd enjoy. Beautiful job
thank you! I'm not big on sweets either these days, but the balance between bittersweet and the filling works for me.

I truly appreciate the skills of the pastry chef when I make something like this. It's a simple thing but everything little wobble shows.
 
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Joined Oct 23, 2008
Bangers and Mash with Onion Gravy
OK, apparently it is always cold and wet in London. I have to lower the AC and turn on a YouTube rain video to sit down and eat this when it's 100 degrees outside! I think I am going to have to mix things up on the next dish and try to create a hybrid English and Florida Summertime dish.

bangersandmash.jpg
 
3,286
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Joined May 5, 2010
The Nanaimo Bar, the quintessential dessert square of BRITISH Columbia, served in every coffee shop, potluck, bbq, fundraiser, wedding, funeral, lunchbox.

The recipe first appeared in Nanaimo, a city on Vancouver Island, reached by ferry via the terminal near me.

There are strict rules about what is and what is not a Nanaimo Bar. When Canada made a stamp to honour the Nanaimo bar, they got the proportions all wrong, as did NY Times Cooking. Canadians were in an uproar about it. So to clarify —

The Nanaimo Bar has 3 layers:
1. Base - . Graham Crackers/cocoa/coconut. Walnuts/pecans are allowed.
2. Middle - BIrd’s Custard/Icing Sugar/Butter. Not too thick a layer, the same thickness as the base is preferred. It’s ok to add flavours like cappuccino, peanut butter, mint. But - Bird’s Custard Powder is essential.
3. Top - Thin layer of melted chocolate (70% callebaut here) & a tablespoon of butter. 55% to 70% chocolate balances out the sweet middle. Not white chocolate, that would be wrong. Very wrong.

Essential ingredients: Graham Crackers, Bird's Custard Powder, Butter, Coconut, and -- good Chocolate and Cocoa. Other ingredients, not pictured, are sugar, icing sugar, egg. I used salted butter, so no salt was added.
View attachment 70739
First, make the base.
People usually bake it but it’s too hot to use the oven today and I actually prefer to cook the beaten egg/sugar/butter in a double boiler and add it to the crumbs/coconut/cocoa. It gives the base a better texture, not dry or crumbly, which can happen when baking,

Melt 1/2 butter and 1/4 cup sugar in your vintage double boiler. While it's melting, beat one egg. Don't make it frothy, just beat it. The egg will be tempered then added to the hot butter/sugar.
View attachment 70743
Stir the tempered egg with the butter until slightly thickened. Not too thick. Then add to the crumbs and coconut.
View attachment 70754
Oops! I forgot to add the cocoa! Taking pictures distracted me. Add cocoa and vanilla. Don't forget. The Nanaimo Bar is never blonde.


View attachment 70747 Put it into the greased 9” pan and smooth it out. I love the mini-roller for this job. Put it in the fridge for 15 minutes.

Next, make the middle.
Bird's Custard Powder, butter and icing sugar are the essential ingredients. You could add a flavour, like cappuccino, mint, peanut butter, scotch. But. It is perfect as-is. Scotch is pretty good, though.
View attachment 70751
Cream the butter, Bird’s, icing sugar. Use your vintage wooden spoon, or your old mixmaster. Think of the 1950s kitchen.
It doesn't have to be perfectly smooth, and never fluffy.
View attachment 70752
Once it's creamed, try to spread it evenly on the base. This is the most difficult part for me, I’m no pastry chef. If anyone has tips on how to spread it evenly, please tell me!

Now, make the top layer.
Melt chocolate in the double boiler, add butter. When melted, pour it over the middle layer. I think I should have put the pan in the fridge before this step, but it will be ok. I ended up having to use the offset spatula because the chocolate started to set.
View attachment 70753
Done! Back in the fridge until it chills enough to cut.

The Nanaimo Bar
View attachment 70750
Again, I am clearly not a pastry chef, it’s a bit messy but it still tastes exactly right!
Wow....They still make Bird's Custard. It's been many years (40) since I had it....Used it in Trifle.
 
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Joined Jul 13, 2012
Ok - this may, or may not fly, but I made Raymond Blanc's Squid and Chorizo Stew for dinner tonight. Now as many know Blanc is French, but migrated (or rather banished) to England when he was quite young. He has earned many awards including the OBE from the Queen herself for elevating the cuisine of Briton. He is a self trained cook save for his mother's tutelage and working hard with his eyes and ears open and has earned two Michelin Stars. A number of other Michelin Star chefs trained under him including Marco Pierre White. This is an exceptional dish and the recipe (and video) are available on line.

Onion, garlic, brunoise of celery, evoo, smoked paprika, white wine that is cooked off in a separate pan. The chorizo, scored squid tubes as well as tentacles, potatoes, tomato paste and chopped tomatoes I opt for fresh when I can get them, otherwise canned is fine. It is slow cooked for 1 hour - that changes the flavor and texture of the squid like you wouldn't believe. Salt and pepper to taste and I add a few dashes of garlic Cholula hot sauce to mine at the end.

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Joined Dec 18, 2010
Oh, Mike… I thought I opened the rules quite wide, and your logic is something I never considered. Blanc is one of my personal heroes. I’ll have to do some soul searching, though…

😂
 
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