AUGUST 2021 CHALLENGE - BRITISH COOKERY

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Joined May 4, 2005
Ladies and gentlemen. The toast sandwich.
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Now, I don't want to hear any comments about what condiments would be good with this, or "you know what would make this better" replies. That's not what this sandwich is about. It's a toast sandwich, and will remain a toast sandwich. Period. 😂
 
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Joined Dec 18, 2010
I am sooooooo veeeeerrrrrryyyyy tempted to call an early close to this challenge. Toast… how very British is that? Besting a toast sandwich will be tough!

and I know additional refinement is not necessary… but for a “fine dining version” I suppose the crust can be cut off. And for a “happy meal version” I suppose the crust can be cut off and the sandwich quartered!
 
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When I made that cucumber sandwich, I did a search on 'English tea sandwiches' I was surprised at the number of different combinations that turned up. Putting together a proper tea party with sandwiches, scones and cakes for this challenge would be quite an undertaking.

mjb.
 
787
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Joined May 4, 2005
When I made that cucumber sandwich, I did a search on 'English tea sandwiches' I was surprised at the number of different combinations that turned up. Putting together a proper tea party with sandwiches, scones and cakes for this challenge would be quite an undertaking.

mjb.
I think I sense a challenge within a challenge.
 
125
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Joined Jun 7, 2021
i will be making something British, that I, and nearly everyone in I.P. Michigan love, the Cornish pasty. The brits are also famous for desert fools, puddings, Yorkshire pudding, heart stews, and soups, fish and chips, cheddars, sausages, Beef Wellington, and many other dishes.

And depending on where you go, American food can be amazing. Think cheesecake, blueberry pie, beef, pizza, ice cream, you name it.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
 
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Go for it, Chief. I worked in the UP for a very brief amount of time (forgot the town but it was near a big copper mine). All we did after work was drink beer, eat pasties, and bowl. For lunch we took pasties “down pit”. Monotonous but delicious!

and, ahem… Yorkshire curd tart… Parkin… treacle tart…
 
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Joined Nov 5, 2007
Okay, a bit more complicated than the cucumber sandwich.

The Players

About 4 and a half pounds of rib roast, 2 bone small end.

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For the gravy:

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Shallot, thyme from the garden, flour and some home made beef stock.

And for the yorkies:

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Eggs, flour, milk and salt. No, I did not put all that salt into the batter.

The Process

The beef was generously salted, stashed uncovered in the fridge for about a day. Then out of the fridge for about 8 hours. It was definitely at room temp before cooking. Slathered with a butter and herb mix. Then the 5/500 method, 5 minutes per pound in a 500F degree oven, then turn the oven off and let it sit in there for 2 hours.

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Looks done to me! Once I cut into it, turned out to be little more done than I would have liked, but only a little.

Meanwhile put together the batter for the yorkshire puddings.

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Once the beef is out of the oven, crank it up to 425F. Put a couple tablespoons of the beef drippings into each hole in a muffin tin. Into the oven for about 10 minutes. Pull it out, quickly fill each hole about halfway with the batter, straight back into the oven.

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That one lad on the bottom row looks unhappy. Wonder why?

Meanwhile, mince the shallot. Put the skillet on the stovetop, medium heat with whats left of the drippings. Sweat for a few minutes with the thyme sprigs. Add the flour, cook for a few minutes. Add the beef broth, let it simmer and thicken. Strain out the shallot bit and thyme sprigs.

The Product

Now this is a nice dinner! Sorry, no mushy peas.

20210805_111949.jpg

This was really good. I ended up eating only half that slab of beef, but did have another yorkie and more gravy. I was happy.

And try as I might, did not find any English red wine at the wine store, poured a California pinot noir.

mjb.

PS: I must have done something wrong, my yorkshire puddings did not turn out like these masterpieces from one of the videos I watched.

Screenshot from 2021-08-05 07-20-47.png
 
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Chicken tikka masala:
Chicken tikka is Indian
Masala is Indian
But chicken tikka masala is British. They wanted a sauce with their chicken tikka!
Indian restaurants are incredibly popular in UK. Their food is (often) British influenced. There is even an abbreviation for it: BIR (British Indian Restaurant) curry.
Anyway, here is my interpretation:
First off: the chicken marinade (yoghurt, garlic, ginger, turmeric, garam masala, chili, cumin)
I ran out of coriander, i must say I didn't really miss it. Most recipes will use lemon or lime juice in the marinade, but I find it makes the chicken mushy if it is in there too long, so I tend to use the lime juice later on. Glad I did, as things came up and the chicken was much longer in the marinade than I planned.
I uaed green chili's as most Indians I know prefer them over red.
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I used fresh turmeric. Here is the proof ;)

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Yes, the picture is upside down. I only used the fillet for the tikka masala.

I made a sauce of onions, garlic and grated tomato. I don't normally as I don't mind the skin, but thought I'll give it a try
IMG_20210810_171938.jpg
IMG_20210810_173412.jpg .

The chicken went on skewers on the grill, once charred it went into the sauce and
I added the marinade to it
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I also made some naan bread to go with the meal.
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And assembled
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In the restaurants, it will be much more red. I used some paprika powder to try, but the turmeric overrules!
 
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Joined Jun 7, 2021
Did some research. It turns out that our neighbors across the pond eat many of the same foods that we eat, and prepared the same way. So I made this British Sunday Dish - Slow Braised Pork Steak, with low Roasted Veggies. The veggies, carrots, and onion, were laid in an enameled cast iron Dutch oven, on a little cooking oil. The thick pork steak was seasoned with S & P, with a touch of ginger and garlic, on both sides, The pork was laid on top of the veggies. The lid was put in place, and the whole thing went into a 190' F. oven, for 4 hours.

The ot was removed, and the lid removed. I let it rest for 15 minutes. During that time, I put sides of cottage cheese, and olives on my plate. I then removed the pork from the pot, and into a hot skillet, just long enough to brown a bit for added flavor. I plated the carrots, and onion, and turned the broth into a very tasty glaze. The meat was plated, with the glaze spooned over the meat. A cold glass of rice milk completes the meal. (dietary restrictions come into play here, which is also why there are no potatoes),

The carrots and onions were great, with the cottage cheese balancing the veggie sweetness. The olives complimented the pork perfectly. The

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the Northpork was very tender, moist, and flavorful It was a very satisfying meal. pork steak glazed 2.jpg pork steakon a plate.jpg pork steak veggies 2.jpg
 
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Joined Jul 15, 2020
Okay, a bit more complicated than the cucumber sandwich.

The Product

Now this is a nice dinner! Sorry, no mushy peas.

View attachment 70648

This was really good. I ended up eating only half that slab of beef, but did have another yorkie and more gravy. I was happy.

And try as I might, did not find any English red wine at the wine store, poured a California pinot noir.

mjb.

PS: I must have done something wrong, my yorkshire puddings did not turn out like these masterpieces from one of the videos I watched.

View attachment 70649
Sorry teamfat teamfat , not to copy you, but the King of British Beefeater dishes, Prime Rib au Jus with Yorkshire Puddings, is kinda my trademark and I just happened to recently finish dry aging a rib primal.

Home Dry-Aging and Butchering:
To start, given the simple, classic flavours of prime rib, I believe that dry-aged beef is key. I buy full rib primal from my local butcher that still hangs meat the old-fashioned way and then dry-age it at home for an additional 3 weeks to get it to a total of 35 day. I have a designated aging fridge with fans for air flow. My butcher was also kind enough to give me some of his trimmings to use to innoculate my fridge and start my mold culture way back when I started out:
Prime Rib 1.jpg

I then butcher it myself into roasts and/or steaks:
Prime Rib 2.jpg

After trimming off, the crust, I take the outer cap off and butcher it into stewing beef. I use it for my jus. I also make sure to keep as much as possible of the fat cap for my sides.

Preparation and Roasting:
I always make my Yorkshire batter the night before from an old 90s Martha Stewart recipe. It is foolproof. I use flour from our local heritage mill, with grassfed organic milk, and free range large eggs.

Next day, I take the roast out and temper it. I rub it with an English mustard mixture, which helps the salt and pepper and pepper to adhere. The mixture is made from a combo of Dijon mustard, Keen's hot mustard powder, and sugar. Then I season the roast with salt and pepper. I pre-heat the oven to 250 Fahrenheit for a long, slow, and slow roast.

While the roast is tempering, I prepare my aromatics for my jus. Basically, I use bottom of the roasting pan to make a jus using the chopped cap meat, a mirepoix of carrots, onions, celery, shallots, and garlic.

I start by heating the roasting pan over a medium burner. I melt some reserved dry aged beef fat therein which I use to brown first the cap meat chunks and then the aromatics. I deglaze the roasting pan with some water and add bay leaves, peppercorns, and a bouquet garni of thyme and parsley. With the liquids brought to the barest of simmers, I add the roast on its rack to the pan and put it all in the oven low and slow at 250 F.

While the meat is roasting, I render dry-aged beef fat for my potatoes. I cut and and peel several Yukon golds into wedges and place them in a bowl of ice water to remove excess starch.

After a rinse, the potatoes go for a quick parboil in salted water that is also enriched with a couple smashed garlic cloves, thyme, peppercorns, and bay leaves.

I also like to pair to roast some heirloom carrots with my prime rib.

Once the probe on the beef reaches 120 F, I pull it from the oven, which I crank to 450 F for the potatoes and carrots. I remove the roast on its rack to rest.

Sides:
I place a roasting pan with rendered beef fat in the oven to hear and the heirloom carrots, which are coated with a mixture of honey, melted butter, and salt.

When the beef fat pan is hot, I add the parboiled potatoes. The carrots and potatoes take about an hour to cook. I regularly toss them them to ensure they brown evenly.

At the same time, I strain the jus from the bottom of the roasting pan into a small sauce pot, which I put into a sink filled with ice water. Once the fat solidifies on top, I skim it off. I then reduce the jus to desired thickness and add some Madeira shortly before the end.

I also use this time to make homemade horseradish cream. I grate fresh horseradish and combine with sour cream, salt, and pepper to taste.

Finishing and Presentation:
When the carrots and potatoes are done, I move them to the warming drawer and crank the oven to 500 F. Once at temp, I replace the roast and its clean roaster in the oven. The roast is seared to a lovely dark brown and the fat rendered to the bottom of the pan for my Yorkshires. I also put my muffin tin for the Yorkshire's in the oven to preheat.

After about 15 minute, I pull the roast and set aside. I reduce the oven to 425. I pour the collected fat from the roasting pan into the hot muffin tin and replace in the oven. I take the cold batter out of the fridge and quickly whisk it to ensure it is well combined. When the fat just starts to smoke in the muffin tin, I ladle in the batter and bake for about 20 min.

While the Yorkshires bake. I get everything else assembled at the table on warmed platters and decant a good bottle of aged Claret. I prefer a right bank, Merlot-based wine with prime rib. This time was a 2003 Saint-Emilion.

When the Yorkshire puddings are done, I carve the roast with my Gramma's Sheffield carving set. Tada:
Prime Rib 3.jpg Prime Rib 4.jpg
British Sunday Lunch: Dry-Aged Roast Rib of Beef with Madeira Jus and Yorkshire Puddings, Potatoes Roasted in beef Drippings, and Honey Glazed Heirloom Carrots. Paired with 2003 Claret.
 
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Joined Jun 7, 2021
I am impressed. So, how do i get to your house again? LOL

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North

Sorry teamfat teamfat , not to copy you, but the King of British Beefeater dishes, Prime Rib au Jus with Yorkshire Puddings, is kinda my trademark and I just happened to recently finish dry aging a rib primal.

Home Dry-Aging and Butchering:
To start, given the simple, classic flavours of prime rib, I believe that dry-aged beef is key. I buy full rib primal from my local butcher that still hangs meat the old-fashioned way and then dry-age it at home for an additional 3 weeks to get it to a total of 35 day. I have a designated aging fridge with fans for air flow. My butcher was also kind enough to give me some of his trimmings to use to innoculate my fridge and start my mold culture way back when I started out:
View attachment 70695

I then butcher it myself into roasts and/or steaks:
View attachment 70696

After trimming off, the crust, I take the outer cap off and butcher it into stewing beef. I use it for my jus. I also make sure to keep as much as possible of the fat cap for my sides.

Preparation and Roasting:
I always make my Yorkshire batter the night before from an old 90s Martha Stewart recipe. It is foolproof. I use flour from our local heritage mill, with grassfed organic milk, and free range large eggs.

Next day, I take the roast out and temper it. I rub it with an English mustard mixture, which helps the salt and pepper and pepper to adhere. The mixture is made from a combo of Dijon mustard, Keen's hot mustard powder, and sugar. Then I season the roast with salt and pepper. I pre-heat the oven to 250 Fahrenheit for a long, slow, and slow roast.

While the roast is tempering, I prepare my aromatics for my jus. Basically, I use bottom of the roasting pan to make a jus using the chopped cap meat, a mirepoix of carrots, onions, celery, shallots, and garlic.

I start by heating the roasting pan over a medium burner. I melt some reserved dry aged beef fat therein which I use to brown first the cap meat chunks and then the aromatics. I deglaze the roasting pan with some water and add bay leaves, peppercorns, and a bouquet garni of thyme and parsley. With the liquids brought to the barest of simmers, I add the roast on its rack to the pan and put it all in the oven low and slow at 250 F.

While the meat is roasting, I render dry-aged beef fat for my potatoes. I cut and and peel several Yukon golds into wedges and place them in a bowl of ice water to remove excess starch.

After a rinse, the potatoes go for a quick parboil in salted water that is also enriched with a couple smashed garlic cloves, thyme, peppercorns, and bay leaves.

I also like to pair to roast some heirloom carrots with my prime rib.

Once the probe on the beef reaches 120 F, I pull it from the oven, which I crank to 450 F for the potatoes and carrots. I remove the roast on its rack to rest.

Sides:
I place a roasting pan with rendered beef fat in the oven to hear and the heirloom carrots, which are coated with a mixture of honey, melted butter, and salt.

When the beef fat pan is hot, I add the parboiled potatoes. The carrots and potatoes take about an hour to cook. I regularly toss them them to ensure they brown evenly.

At the same time, I strain the jus from the bottom of the roasting pan into a small sauce pot, which I put into a sink filled with ice water. Once the fat solidifies on top, I skim it off. I then reduce the jus to desired thickness and add some Madeira shortly before the end.

I also use this time to make homemade horseradish cream. I grate fresh horseradish and combine with sour cream, salt, and pepper to taste.

Finishing and Presentation:
When the carrots and potatoes are done, I move them to the warming drawer and crank the oven to 500 F. Once at temp, I replace the roast and its clean roaster in the oven. The roast is seared to a lovely dark brown and the fat rendered to the bottom of the pan for my Yorkshires. I also put my muffin tin for the Yorkshire's in the oven to preheat.

After about 15 minute, I pull the roast and set aside. I reduce the oven to 425. I pour the collected fat from the roasting pan into the hot muffin tin and replace in the oven. I take the cold batter out of the fridge and quickly whisk it to ensure it is well combined. When the fat just starts to smoke in the muffin tin, I ladle in the batter and bake for about 20 min.

While the Yorkshires bake. I get everything else assembled at the table on warmed platters and decant a good bottle of aged Claret. I prefer a right bank, Merlot-based wine with prime rib. This time was a 2003 Saint-Emilion.

When the Yorkshire puddings are done, I carve the roast with my Gramma's Sheffield carving set. Tada:
View attachment 70697 View attachment 70698
British Sunday Lunch: Dry-Aged Prime Rib Roast of Beef with Madeira Jus and Yorkshire Puddings, Potatoes Roasted in beef Drippings, and Honey Glazed Heirloom Carrots. Paired with 2003 Claret.
 
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Joined Jan 8, 2010
What's not to like in that dish!

Mine:
Roast chicken and roast veg.
Well, rotisserie, as no oven and it's nicer ;)
I've decided that I may enter a rotisserie chicken for about any challenge to come, ' cause I like them!
Now this one is with parsley (nope, never managed to grow it here) sage (same story) rosemary (yes! Fresh from the garden) and thyme (a little bit of the dried stuff), and garlic, dijon mustard, and a homemade spicy coarse mustard
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Marinated the chocken
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Got my drip pan ready
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And got going on my weber kettle with rotisserie ring

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I ate all the drip pan ingredients and 2 wings.
Plenty chicken left over!
 
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Joined Jul 15, 2020
Thanks everyone for the kind responses to my roast beef!

I just noticed that that us former colonies are included in this month's contest, so I guess my very Canadian spread from the August long weekend two weeks ago also counts!

As some of you might know, Montreal is the culinary capital of Canada. One of its most famous traditional food items is Montreal Smoked Meat, which is like Pastrami but made from the Brisket using the eponymous Montreal Spice Rub. Montreal spice is noted for its savory flavours with a complete absence of sweet elements.

I have never tried my hands at a true montreal smoked meat, but I use it as my inspiration for my Canadian version of BBQ. Like our American cousins, we Canadians love to get outside and grills or BBQ in the summer. I think we relish it even more in some ways due to our cold, snowy winters. Like Texas BBQ, the Montreal meat smoking culture comes from Central and Eastern European immigrants like my own parents so I look to Texas for my adaptation.

So without further adieu, here is my Montreal Smoked Short Ribs.

Butchering and Prep:
I get a full set of beef short ribs from the plate., preferably ribs 6-8. I saw them in half and divide into three rib segments.
MSM 1.jpg

Then, I slather the meat with simple yellow mustard, which helps the rub to stick and create a good bark for smoke development. I use the spice rub from Schwartz's Deli in Montreal. If I can't get it, Joe Beef's version is good too. It is a little light on the salt though.
MSM 2.jpg

I have Weber Summit Kamado-style cooker. I build a fire out of large block Kamado Joe charcoal and sugar maple wood chunks. I find the large block charcoal burns slower and more evenly. light the fire with a couple parrafin cubes and my kitchen torch.

Once I get the cooker up to temp, I put in my heat damper plate over the fire bed. I use my Gramma's old enamelled roaster pan as my drip pan (it is a perfect fit for the centre section of the damper and does not get in the way of accessing the side flaps.) I fill it with hot water.

Once I get a consistent stream of blue smoke and the cooker is at my desired temp of about 285-290 F, I I put the ribs on.

Smoking:
I leave them alone for the first 5 hours., keeping a regular eye on the smoke colour and temp. After 5 hours, I start spritzing the edges with apple cider vinegar.
MSM 3.jpg

I cook the ribs until they reacha temp of about 203 F between the bones, usually about 8-9 hours. I then wrap them in foil and let rest for about 30 minutes.

Sides:
For sides, I usually make homemade potato chips. I get some nice russets, peel, slice with my mandolin the day before, and let them soak in a bowl of ice water overnight to remove excess starch and to crisp them up. I change the water several times.

While the ribs are resting, I get my dutch oven filled with peanut oil up to 365 F. I drain, rinse, and dry the potato slices. Then fry in batches for about 2-3 minutes until they are uniformly golden brown. I toss each batch in a bowl with paper towel and toss with kosher salt.

I also serve the ribs with good Carraway Rye Bread from my local Polish-Canadian deli/bakery and Moishe's Dill Pickles from Montreal.

For sauce, I use Aaron Franklin's Rib Sauce as a base. but substitute elements more suited to the beef such as dark brown sugar for the called for golden.

I serve the ribs with good Central European beer.

Presentation:
MSM 4.jpg
MSM 6.jpg
MSM 5.jpg

Canadian BBQ, Eh: Montreal Smoked Short Ribs with Homemade Kettle Ribs, Rye Bread, and Kosher Dill Pickles.
 
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I'm not sure why but I go weeks or months not thinking to check cheftalk. I think it's brain overload from sites like reddit. Anyway.. It's on like Donkey Kong! I can get at least 3 in with what's left in August
 
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I've only just figured out what to make for last month... Know this though, I do get inspiration from these posts for future dishes. I hope to return the favor and actually post one of my own - soon.
 

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