Au jus

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by koukouvagia, Feb 13, 2011.

  1. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

    Messages:
    7,402
    Likes Received:
    633
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    I'd like to make a prime rib soon and I want to develop a very nice jus.  Sometimes at restaurants they serve a very dark jus, mine never comes out dark.  Basically I roast my prime rib sitting on top of a mix of onions, garlic, celery and carrots that have been tossed with a little olive oil, salt, pepper, and dry thyme.  After roasting I add a little beef stock to the pan and reduce, skim and serve.

    Are there any ingredients I'm missing from my jus?  How can I make it more flavorful? 
     
  2. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    8,593
    Likes Received:
    536
    Exp:
    I Just Like Food
    Start with some good beef stock in the bottom, Maybe a little red wine.

    Or to backtrack to the tomato paste thread, some tomato paste among the vegies will contribute some flavor and darken up the color.

    Or do both.

    Broth from a good French Onion Soup does a nice stand in for leftovers, though I've cheated  and made it ahead just to have lots of faux jus for things like French dip sandwiches and such.
     
  3. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

    Messages:
    2,270
    Likes Received:
    206
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    I don't get use of the term "au jus", french indeed, but probably something very american?

    Is it synonyme to roasting drippings?

    I can only add that boosting up the flavor and color of cooking juices requires one thing; add a spoonfull of dark soy! Yummie!
     
  4. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

    Messages:
    7,402
    Likes Received:
    633
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    We use the term au jus when we use the drippings for the roast.  It's often associated with prime rib because in most cases of making a roast we use the drippings to make gravy instead.
     
  5. prairiechef

    prairiechef

    Messages:
    229
    Likes Received:
    22
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    The term "au jus" is used to say that your dish is being served with a jus... Prime Rib au jus. One cannot make an "au jus", but one can make a "jus". Otherwise it's a bit like saying "I am making a with juice".

    Sorry. I had to pipe in, it's one of my biggest terminology peeves.
     
  6. brianshaw

    brianshaw

    Messages:
    3,171
    Likes Received:
    379
    Exp:
    Former Chef
    It sounds like you should have a decent tasting jus.  If you can, use fresh thyme.  Maybe some butter as a final finish to it???

    Regarding color, using a good stock from roasted bones will help.  Or even a good beef base (definitely not bullion cubes) will add both flavor and color.  When all else fails... kitchen bouquet.  :)
     
  7. brianshaw

    brianshaw

    Messages:
    3,171
    Likes Received:
    379
    Exp:
    Former Chef
    p.s.  better color also happens wehn the meat juices build a fond directly on the pan.  I often roast without a vegetable base and get the vegetal flavors integrated via the stock.
     
  8. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

    Messages:
    7,402
    Likes Received:
    633
    Exp:
    Home Cook
     I don't know who you're correcting but my OP was correct regarding  use of terminology.
     
  9. pattypan

    pattypan

    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Professional Pastry Chef
    thanks Prairie Chef , the term with au jus drives me crazy too!

    I think gravy may be the jus thickened up?

    however, Pastry person here.
     
  10. chefbillyb

    chefbillyb

    Messages:
    2,128
    Likes Received:
    473
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    When all else fails us "Au Caramel Couleur" That's French for, kick ass way to color gravy and au jus.............CBB
     
  11. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

    Messages:
    7,402
    Likes Received:
    633
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    Has anyone put worschestershire sauce in their jus?
     
  12. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    8,593
    Likes Received:
    536
    Exp:
    I Just Like Food
    Nothing wrong with worcestershire sauce. But go with a light hand as it adds salt and some sourness too. Won't have quite as much color impact as I think you're looking for but will contribute nicely.
     
  13. chefbillyb

    chefbillyb

    Messages:
    2,128
    Likes Received:
    473
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    I put Woo sauce in my Turkey gravy last week, needed a bit of color..............
     
  14. brianshaw

    brianshaw

    Messages:
    3,171
    Likes Received:
    379
    Exp:
    Former Chef

     I just googled that and tried to buy some.  I think what I'm getting, though, is a 24 year-old French bi-racial model who is at least 8 inches taller than me.  Talk about kick ass!
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2011
  15. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

    Messages:
    2,270
    Likes Received:
    206
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    That explanation is very correct and that's why "au jus" seems such a strange terminologie to me and probably also to anyone who understands and speaks french. It doesn't make sense. There should be a noun in front of the "au", like the example PrairieChef gives; prime rib au jus. Many times in french they would even use prime rib dans son jus or avec son jus.

    Obviously the terminologie "au jus" has started a life on it's own in the US. I have no problem with that, that's how all languages develope.

    @ChefBillyB; identical mistake like PrairieChef explains for Au Caramel Couleur; there should be a noun in front of the expression or it should be used without the "au". Also, it's Couleur Caramel, not Caramel Couleur, sorry.
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2011
  16. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

    Messages:
    7,402
    Likes Received:
    633
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    I tried making it with a splash of soy sauce as ChrisBelgium suggested.  It worked, turned a nice dark color but I won't add as much next time because it has an effect on the flavor.  Otherwise it was a delicious jus that accompanied our prime rib valentine's dinner.
     
  17. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

    Messages:
    2,270
    Likes Received:
    206
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    Yeah, soy can be very salty too. Best to deglaze first with some bouillon or stock and then add the soy. Extra salt isn't even needed.
     
  18. chefedb

    chefedb

    Messages:
    5,516
    Likes Received:
    177
    Exp:
    Retired Chef
    A lot of restaurants and hotels add a shot of Maggi and Kitchen Bouquet. They both enhance the color. Add after cooking as they get a bit bitter when cooked.
     
  19. chefbillyb

    chefbillyb

    Messages:
    2,128
    Likes Received:
    473
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    They also make a Black Soy, it's thicker, sweeter, made with Molasses, less salty..............CBB
     
  20. chefedb

    chefedb

    Messages:
    5,516
    Likes Received:
    177
    Exp:
    Retired Chef
    Billy !  Ever heard the term  "Black Jack""  (used years ago)