At the weekly market

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We have a market on Tuesdays in my own village, a market on Mondays in a town at 5 km distance and another on Thursdays at yet another town at 5 km distance.

Best sources for local produce and seasonal food. Not always the cheapest but the very best you can get. Yesterday, Thursday, I came home with things like this;


Belgian White asparagus. It doesn't show on the picture but these are a good 2 cm in diameter! Price; around 1€ per piece. Available during a short season. We check the freshness by rubbing some asparagus along each other; it has to produce a loud squeaking sound.


Belgian strawberries. They mostly come a little later after the start of the asparagus season. We have a very strong reputation in producing high quality strawberries, real taste bombs. A quick taste with some Greek yoghurt and nothing else on them.


Belgian cheeses. It may surprise you if you knew that my country has over... 300 cheeses! Exceptionally, both of the above have something to do with beer too. The left one is an abbey-style cheese called "Groendal Grand Cru", a cheese that had a treatment with Rodenbach Grand Cru, an "old brown" quality beer. The cheese on the right is "Poperingse Keikop" a soft cheese that contains hop shoots. Every year when the hop starts growing again, they remove the short shoots and leave only a few to grow. The removed shoots are a very expensive delicacy and sold to mostly top restaurants all over the world where they are prepared mostly like asparagus.

Both cheeses are simply stunning!

And I also brought some monk fish from the market. Forgot to take a picture.
 
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Wow those berries and cheeses sound amazing Chris. This is a fun idea for a thread. Post pics of the great local foods you find at a farmers' market!

Are there vendors at the Belgian markets that sell "value added" foods Chris? Things like prepared foods?

Some markets here in the US do, some don't. Always wondered what the small village markets in Europe had.
 
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Great products. I so miss tasty strawberries, Ours are big and so watery and tastless that it's a shame.
 
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I live in Tangoland. To make it quick in June 11, 2010, 2 kilograms of black potatoes (dirty) = 0.63 USA dollars and 1 Kilogram of bananas = 1 USA dollar.
 
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Look at that charcuterie and cheeses...

I will enjoy this thread. Sure i will.
 
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Tangoland, Tango Land, Land where Tango reigns supreme, ah yes Argentina!

(Says the dancer in me /img/vbsmilies/smilies/bounce.gif)
 
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Primarily C/W, e.g. Two-step, Waltz, East Coast Swing, West Coast swing, thirty or so partner dances, about 200-250 line dances, but also Foxtrot, Viennese Waltz, Cha-Cha-Cha, Rumba, Night Club Two Step, and can play with Samba, Salsa, Mambo, and Tango. Want to learn Paso Doble, perfect my Jive and Lindy Hop.

C/W is competition styling, ballroom and Latin strictly social.
 
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...Are there vendors at the Belgian markets that sell "value added" foods Chris? Things like prepared foods?

Some markets here in the US do, some don't. Always wondered what the small village markets in Europe had.
@foodnfoto  Well, you will find the usual hams and pâtés at charcuterie stands, all kinds of patisserie and other baking goods, the usual things you would expect on a market. However, these markets are mainly fresh-markets, aiming at selling the freshest seasonal veggies, meat, milk products, cheeses, fish etc. The biggest change over the years is that a few immigrants have started a small business. I always like to sniff around their spices and herbs, prepared olives etc. And there's just that one Vietnamese person who sells nems to be fried at home and other specialties. Next time I will take a few pictures on the market itself.
 
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