Artisanal truffle oil- how best to use it? Need advice/references/suggestions/recipes

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by mikelm, May 16, 2014.

  1. mikelm

    mikelm

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    Today I will score a modest amount of house-made truffle oil from one of Chicago's top restaurants, and I need advice as how best to utilize it. I've never used it before.

    For openers, I'm thinking a pasta dish - capellini probably with some EVOO-sauteed morels, garlic, with the truffle oil sparingly added at service; parsley garnish and a sprinkle of Parm.  Could I fit some capers in here, or would that be overdoing it?

    I'll greatly appreciate having the advantage of your experience. On this, and of course other dishes as well.

    Many thanks in advance.

    Mike

    Hey, I'm excited!
     
  2. stuartscholes

    stuartscholes

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    I have some truffle oil at home, I use it just before serving on risotto. I wouldn't do capers, but as I don't particularly care for them then someone else might have more experience.
     
  3. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    Mike, I bought a small bottle of artisanal truffle oil a few years ago. Used it a few times but forgot all about it since. If it's a good product, you will notice that the taste and flavor is quite milder than that awful synthetic junk that's on the market. So you can use a bit more than a few drops.

    My advice is to use it in a few months and not to keep it for a few years; artisanal truffle oil loses its truffle taste after a while, synthetic keeps that horrible taste. Many times the better truffle oils are made from summer truffle which has a much milder taste than the more expensive winter truffle; both summer and winter truffles are black truffles. I always question oils made from white truffle; these white truffles are insanely expensive and very hard to find for home use.

    Best to not heat the oil but to add a little just before serving. If it's not a synthetic oil, you can easily go for adding as much as a small tsp to a plate without any problem. Truffle goes incredibly well with eggs; put some on an omelet and enjoy! Also on chicken and poultry dishes in general, on pasta, in all kinds of mushroom preparations and in many cream sauces. And as said always last minute addition.

    Truffles are many times stored in a tightly closed jar together with fresh eggs and even more in (uncooked) rice that will be used later on in risotto. Both eggs and rice take the taste of truffle.

    And I agree with Stuart, the capers don't really belong in your planned pasta dish. Truffle oil in risotto, oh yes!

    A small suggestion; pan fry chicken breast as usual, remove from the pan, add a finely chopped shallot and let sweat on low fire, add your morels and let them fry gently. Remove morels from the pan, add a good dash of white wine, reduce at least by half. Add chicken stock and reduce again. Add cream and let simmer until the desired consistency. Taste for s&p, add the morels and set aside away from the fire for a while. Add a dash of your truffle oil just before serving. Could be served with some cappellini.
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2014
  4. steve tphc

    steve tphc

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    I have tried some very expensive bottles that my reckoning were only a disappointment. Real black truffles when bought fresh may be $450 a pound but that is two small quarter sized truffles for about $25. The real McCoy sliced on a truffle slicer can add the wonderful mushroom aroma like no other mushroom. I adore fresh farm eggs scrambled lightly and topped with truffle slices.

    Many of these so called triffle oils are not made from actual truffles, but from our synthetic product 2,4-dithiapentane otherwise known as truffle aroma. This is NOT FOR ME!
     
  5. mikelm

    mikelm

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    Chris-

    Thanks for your response.  Your chicken/morel recipe is in the file for trying very soon.

    Steve-

    Thank you as well.  I've looked at the several "truffle" oils at the local Whole Foods.  None listed truffle in the ingredient list...

    My son turned up a recipe which we'll be trying:

    http://www.yummly.com/recipe/external/Roasted-Kale-with-Garlic-and-Truffle-Oil-515002

    I just happen to love crisp, roasted kale (as opposed to kale in any other form) so I'm looking  forward to this.  I've never tried garlic with my roasted kale, so the whole idea sounds exciting.

    Mike
     
  6. brandon odell

    brandon odell

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    I haven't found a good truffle oil at Whole Foods. The only good one I've found at a grocery store was Roland brand white truffle oil. It has the piece of truffle still in the bottle, which is the only way to buy truffle oil in my opinion. They make a black truffle oil too but I haven't tried it.

    Another vote here for not cooking with it. Truffle oil is a condiment, not a cooking fat. I think its awesome drizzled around a hunk of lasagna and sprinkled with pepper flakes. For that matter, its great on any fresh pasta.

    One of my favorite uses is in prepared salads. I do a roasted Brussels sprout salad that's its great in with some roasted pepper, roasted red onion, mushrooms, garlic and white balsamic vinegar.