ARMY Chefs

Discussion in 'The Late Night Cafe (off-topic)' started by futurebaker, May 21, 2013.

  1. futurebaker

    futurebaker

    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Culinary Student
    I am in the middle of recruiting into the ARMY!!

    Right now I am waiting on a waver to be approved for because of my arm. Long story..

    3 years ago I broke my left forearm in a skateboarding accident (fell off a ramp, haha). Now I have plates and screws in my arm and me trying to join the ARMY is taking longer than usual.

                                                                 This is a pic of my X Ray:

                                               
    I decided to extend my cooking desire through joining the ARMY and be a chef :) Any other military chefs out there can give me some advice? Anything will be helpful :)

    Thanks!!! :D
     
  2. Iceman

    Iceman

    Messages:
    2,486
    Likes Received:
    422
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    All things being equal ... there's always work.    The NAVY is so much better though.
     
    Last edited: May 21, 2013
  3. futurebaker

    futurebaker

    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Culinary Student
    I feel that I should start with the ARMY :)

    For now, I would like to know if there is anything I need to know about being a cook for the military. I may need to learn how to cook really fast :) and wake up early.. haha I guess coffee is my best friend :)
     
  4. wademajic

    wademajic

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    I started my career by cooking in the Army for 3 years and then went to Chef school.  Army food gets a bad wrap but its was a great experience.  Just like any restaurant you will work with some people that take pride in their work and some who just don't care.
     
  5. Iceman

    Iceman

    Messages:
    2,486
    Likes Received:
    422
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    The military branches are not like stations of a kitchen.  You don't move from one to another when you learn a new skill.  I was in the NAVY.  I said the NAVY was better.  That's the way it is.  Very simple.  When you join the military you don't need to know anything.  You will be taught and trained all about what you will need to know.  Again, it's a very simple procedure.  I originally enlisted in emergency medical services.  I did other things too before my first year was up.  If I was a snotty punk 18-yo all over again I would do it all over again the same way, but in culinary.  If they take you, be happy.  You get free education, free healthcare, you get to meet chicks, you get to see the world and you get paid, like forever, as long as you stick it out.  It's a beautiful thing.  
     
    kokopuffs likes this.
  6. futurebaker

    futurebaker

    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Culinary Student
    Theres ALWAYS the ones who dont care!! Ugh! Thats what makes every job difficult :)

    But it also gives me a chance to fight off their laziness :D haha. my sergeant's advice to me is if i wake up every morning with a positive attitude, I'll do fine :) Good thing i do that anyways haha. 

    btw what is basic combat training like? and where did you go for it? just wondering :)
     
  7. futurebaker

    futurebaker

    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Culinary Student
    haha nice IceMan :) I hope the military is right for me. I'm pretty much a work-a-holic and love to learn something new every day.. especially in food :) 

    I believe that I'll do just fine ;)
     
  8. paul alfred

    paul alfred

    Messages:
    80
    Likes Received:
    11
    Exp:
    Line Cook
    I was in the Air Force for seven years, and while I was not a cook for the military I do believe that many things I learned while in the service have been a BIG help now that I work in a kitchen.  Compared to how I was before my military service, I now handle stressful situations with a calmer, more level head, I take criticism well, and I am far more disciplined and focused.  There are many other things that I have been able to apply from my time in the Air Force to my life now, and I'm very glad for it.  Conversely, I'm sure that many things you learned by working in a kitchen so far will help you in the Army.  Whether you're in the Army for the next 4 years, or the next 20, let it be a learning experience.  Keep an open mind, learn from everyone, and if possible find someone at each assignment to mentor you.  You'll do great!
     
  9. petemccracken

    petemccracken

    Messages:
    3,401
    Likes Received:
    159
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    My Army basic training was 48 years ago so my experience will be of little help.

    I believe there was a ChefTalk member, perhaps Flattop?, that was a combat Army cook.
     
     
  10. futurebaker

    futurebaker

    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Culinary Student
    Thanks, I'll look into Flattop, and I believe that if I do have someone to mentor me along the way, I will survive the pressure. I like criticism too when it comes to my cooking, because how will I know if I need to improve or not? 

    Well all of this has been helpful! Is there anything specifically that i will need to pay attention to? What are the activities involved in being a cook in the military, well besides straight cooking? I heard from a previous military cook that we will be trained to set up mobile kitchens and dining areas, and that I will need to wake up early every day (Im not really good at that). Haha
     
  11. duckfat

    duckfat

    Messages:
    1,354
    Likes Received:
    24
    Exp:
    Retired Chef
    Personally I wouldn't be caught dead in those Navy Tidy Whities. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif/img/vbsmilies/smilies/lol.gif

    Camo is much better. GO ARMY!

    My Basic was over 30 years ago at Ft Jackson SC. The military has some incredible kitchens so just like cooking any where you go as far as you want to.

    Better start setting that alarm clock early!

    Dave
     
  12. petemccracken

    petemccracken

    Messages:
    3,401
    Likes Received:
    159
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    48 years ago, Ft. Polk, LA, then Ft. Gordon, USASESS, Co. "Y"
     
  13. Iceman

    Iceman

    Messages:
    2,486
    Likes Received:
    422
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    Pansys ... all of ya'. 
     
  14. futurebaker

    futurebaker

    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Culinary Student
    Haha you can try to convince me all you want about the Navy, but I am still into the Army :) and a chef in the Army is where i want to be. I  choose to be ARMY STRONG!! :D
     
  15. duckfat

    duckfat

    Messages:
    1,354
    Likes Received:
    24
    Exp:
    Retired Chef
    I'd rather shoot M-16's and LAW's instead of those cute little 9mm's the Navy uses. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/peace.gif

    Dave
     
  16. rat

    rat

    Messages:
    562
    Likes Received:
    21
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    I remember my uncle Frank telling me that after the battle at Normandy he and about 5000 other troops were cold, tired and wet, miserable and wanting to go home. Suddenly the whole camp could smell the smell of chocolate chip cookies. Some soldiers had found a bakery nearby and brought back a lot of flour, sugar, eggs and some chocolate. The baker in the unit decided to make the cookies. My uncle told me there was, in his words "near a goddam riot to get to the chow station". He said those were the best cookies he ever had. Morale went up 100% after that.So he approved of me being a pastry chef.Don't knock the military cooks, they do some damn nice work.
     
  17. trooper

    trooper

    Messages:
    246
    Likes Received:
    23
    Exp:
    Private Chef
    The Army and other forces outsource mess operations now. There is a place for cooks, but I doubt there are many MKT's operating afield anymore. I was Army Cavalry, not a cook. But I would agree with above comments: Navy seems to have the best and most variety of food. You don't want to spend four years heating K-rats and toiling over 55gal immersion heaters in a mud puddle.
     
  18. futurebaker

    futurebaker

    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Culinary Student
    rat, that reply made me feel so much better about becoming a cook. I am mostly into pastries and baking, and reading that post made me think of making soldiers feel at home even though they are so far away. Little things like that make such a huge impact to a broken and tired heart, and that is what i want to do with my life; not only feed soldiers, but to build them, give them something to look forward to everyday, and to give them a piece of home in every bite. It doesnt matter what food variety is more in each military branch, but it is the cook that makes them delicious and memorable. I chose the ARMY to serve, and that is what im going to stick with, because nothing else seems right for me. :)
     
  19. chefbigmike

    chefbigmike

    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    11
    Exp:
    Sous Chef
    During my culinary school years I had the chance to see the Air Force Academy kitchen. My whole acf team was in awe. All I have to say is cleanliness is godliness.