Arlequin

379
10
Joined Mar 13, 2001
No no, not Harlequin Romance Novels...
Looking for a good "Arlequin" recipe for home baker??
I have one large enough to feed an army, that is, restaurant size, and I don't have enough experience to bring it down to "home size".
:eek:
:eek:
 
1,640
12
Joined Mar 6, 2001
Ditto, it's not a name I recognize.

Usually you can just divide all your ingredients with the same number. For instance a recipe that produces a full professional size sheet pan would be 4 x's (times) a recipe that fit a 9"x13" recipe, so you would divide the recipe by 4 to bake at home in a 9"x13" pan. Then you go down the entire list of ingredients and divide each by 4.

What number to divide by will always be a guessing game since this wasn't a home type recipe blown-up. Maybe you want to bake it in a 8" square pan...then you'd need to divide your recipe even more since 8" square holds less then a 9'x13" pan.

You have to have some experience to judge if you have too much or not enough batter for your pan size once it's mixed. I'd choose my pan size after I mixed the item.
 
379
10
Joined Mar 13, 2001
Thanx for the advice.

It's very French:

A multi-layered cake similar to Opera. The layers consist of, from the bottom up:

- chocolate sponge
- milk chocolate bavarian cream
- pistachio sponge
- pistachio bavarian cream; and

the top layer consists of alternating strips of chocolate sponge and pistachio sponge cut on the diagonal and glued together with apricot glaze.

The top is then finished off with a layer of apricot glaze (looks like a mirror).

I have a great picture in jpg format. How can I post this right on this Board? I lack a lot of words in english to explain what it is but a picture is worth one thousand words...

[ March 27, 2001: Message edited by: pooh ]

[ March 27, 2001: Message edited by: pooh ]

Note: The pistachio sponge would be a Joconde.

[ May 02, 2001: Message edited by: pooh ]
 
2,550
13
Joined Mar 13, 2001
This is puzzling me. I made a search through
Pastry Chef Central who replied that it could also be known as "Clichy Torte". They say it looks very much like the Opera.

Anybody heard of Clichy Torte?


:confused:
 
799
12
Joined Feb 21, 2001
Clichy is the signature gateau of a patisserie in France. There are three books written by two men, Bruce Healy and Paul Bugat (Sp?) Mastering the Art of French Pastry, The Art of the Cake, and The French Cookie Book. If I remember correctly, it was Bugat's father or grandfather who updated Opera and called it Clichy. they look a lot alike. I have myself committed to making about 350 little squares of it for a Mother's Day buffet. All three of those books are wonderful. And I wonder if Arlequin isn't really Harlequin, which refers to a clown, and hence the checkerboard pattern of the cake. If Pooh can post the recipe, we might be able to chop it down for her, especially if it's in weights.
 
379
10
Joined Mar 13, 2001
According to DuBarry Cacao, where the recipe comes from, it is spelled with an "A".

It's quite lengthy. Would you prefer by PM?

:rolleyes:

P.S.: The original is in French. Can you read it? If not, I started translating...

Can I send you jpg photo by e-mail?

[ May 02, 2001: Message edited by: pooh ]
 
379
10
Joined Mar 13, 2001
I found it. I had completed translation some time ago and forgot about it...so disregard previous message. I still would love to send you photo through e-mail if I could.

L'ARLEQUIN

Note:1 egg yolk = 30 g
1 egg white = 20 g

Approximately 8 doz. eggs total for this recipe.

Makes 6 squares of 22 x 22 cm x 3,5 cm.

It's easier if frames are used instead of pans. However, in the case of pans, they must be lined with cling film, leaving an overlap all around for easy unmolding.

Note about the assembly

The assembly is to be done upside down, i.e. starting with the top layer in the bottom of the pan.


Chocolate Sponge
200 g egg yolks
530 g whole eggs
500 g granulated sugar

330 g egg whites
50 g granulated sugar

125 g flour
125 g powdered cocoa

1. Whip together the egg yolks, the whole eggs and the sugar.

2. In a separate bowl, whip the egg whites, incorporating the sugar gradually.

3. Sift the flour together with the powdered cocoa and add to the egg yolk mixture.

4. Carefully fold in the egg whites.

5. Pour 450 g of mixture per sheet (60 x 40 cm.).

6. Bake at 500 degrees F., 8 to 9 minutes.

Pistachio Joconde
200 g whole eggs
140 g melted butter
650 g egg whites
250 g granulated sugar

1. With the paddle of the Kitchenaid, beat together:
600 g almond paste 50%
300 g pistachio paste sweetened at 50%
320 g egg yolks
[or]
500 g raw almond paste 66/34
100 g icing sugar
300 g pistachio paste sweetened at 50%
320 g egg yolks

2. Gradually add the whole eggs to the mixture, beat and add the melted butter, in small additions.

3. In a separate bowl, whip the egg whites and the sugar.

4. Carefully fold in the egg whites.

5. Pour 600 g per sheet (60 x 40 cm.). The thickness of this batter should be 1/8-inch per sheet.

6. Bake at 446 degrees F, 10 to 12 minutes.

When cooled, start cutting the chocolate and pistachio strips and place in the bottom of the prepared pans or frames.

Pistachio Bavarian Cream
400 g whipping cream
500 g milk
160 g egg yolks
160 g granulated sugar
80 g pistachio paste sweetened at 50%
7 gelatin sheets softened in water
25 g pure Kirsch

1. Beat the cream so it barely starts mounding and keep it refrigerated.

2. Bring the milk to a boil in saucepan. In another saucepan, mix together the egg yolks and the sugar well with a wooden spoon; very slowly, in small additions, add the still scalding hot milk, stirring well. Stir in the pistachio paste. Cook the stirred custard.

3. While it is still hot, stabilize the custard with the softened gelatin sheets.

4. As soon as the gelatin has completely melted (it will do so almost instantly), add the Kirsch and strain. Cool the custard over ice.

5. Fold the prepared heavy cream into the cold custard until both have homogenized into each other.

6. Mold on top of the strips, and keep refrigerated.

Milk Chocolate Bavarian Cream
600 g whipping cream
500 g milk
120 g egg yolks
80 g granulated sugar
6 gelatin sheets softened in water

1. Beat the cream so it barely starts mounding and keep it refrigerated.

2. Bring the milk to a boil in saucepan. In another saucepan, mix together the egg yolks and the sugar well with a wooden spoon; very slowly, in small additions, add the still scalding hot milk, stirring well. Cook the stirred custard.

3. While it is still hot, stabilize the custard the softened gelatin sheets.

4. As soon as the gelatin has completely melted (it will do so almost instantly), strain into 600 g melted couverture milk chocolate, whisking well. Cool the custard over ice.

5. Fold the prepared heavy cream into the cold custard until both have homogenized into each other.

6. Remove the pans from the refrigerator and carefully place a layer of pistachio Joconde on top. Then, proceed with the layer of milk chocolate bavarian cream.

7. Finish with a layer of chocolate sponge.

Wrap tighly with cling film and chill for several hours.


TO FINISH/DECORATE
Glaze with strained apricot jelly.
Decorate with half pistachios.


:p :p

[ May 02, 2001: Message edited by: pooh ]
 
799
12
Joined Feb 21, 2001
8 dozen eggs,? How big is this monster? I looked it up--Paul Bugat owns this patisserie Clichy, and his father and grandfather never came near Opera torte. Clichy the gateau was first put together in the early 1900's by the guy who opened the shop. So, you want this formula cut down to make 1 9 inch gateau? BTW, they taught us in school what the difference is between a cake and a torte. Anybody else got a working definition?
 
379
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Joined Mar 13, 2001
I know bighat, LOL, it's a professional recipe from school, hee-hee!

Makes 6 squares of 22 x 22 cm x 3,5 cm.

So a 9 inch gâteau will do FINE!

I think I counted right, based on formula
1 egg yolk = 30 g
1 egg white = 20 g


For 1 gâteau = 16 eggs would be required!

We're pretty far from Duncan Hines aren't we!!

:p
 
379
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Joined Mar 13, 2001
You're funny, Kokopuffs, LOL!

:rolleyes:

[ May 15, 2001: Message edited by: pooh ]
 
1,839
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Joined May 29, 1999
torte is low, 2 to 3 inches high with dence filling like butter cream and ganache. Usually eaten in the evening.
gateaux is a lighter and higher cake made with whipped cream and light fillings. Usually eaten at tea.
cake could be any of the above.

How'd I do? ;)
 
2,938
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Joined Mar 4, 2000
Torte is lower in height, and follows a classical example. A cake is higher than a torte. Gateau I always lumped in with torte. I'm sure there's a difference, but I don't know what. Maybe gateau is the French word for cake (meaning taller than a torte). Times of day that they are eaten? Is that really a defining factor? That's interesting. :cool:
 
799
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Joined Feb 21, 2001
It's even more sublime than all that- according to the Johnson & Wales curriculum. A torte is a dessert made out of cake.
 
379
10
Joined Mar 13, 2001
Very good, thebighat! LMBO!

Did you receive the pix? Isn't it inspiring?


:rolleyes:
 
799
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Joined Feb 21, 2001
Actually, no, the picture was apparently not in the mail. I converted the recipe to a weight system I can understand, but haven't been able to break it down. Had a wedding cake to make in the 90 degree heat. Chocolate chiffon sponge, white chocolate buttercream and I slipped gelled inserts of passion fruit into the middle of each tier. It was covered with broken pieces of white chocolate,which made icing it sooo much easier. I delivered it, and the wedding party, and all the guests, were in Star Wars kind of costumes. One guy was in a suit of duct tape. Looked like a lot of fun. I turned from setting the cake up and the waitress behind me was someone I sat next to in 8th grade math in 1963. Small world, but then, this was only the next town over from where we went to school.
 
379
10
Joined Mar 13, 2001
Duct Tape??? Too funny! LOL

Wow, you do wedding cakes! I'm impressed! It's a lot of work let alone the 90 degree temperature! I do take my small hat off to you...hum...did I say that right?

About your schoolgirl friend, what a coincidence, it is a small world!

Are you converting to American system, as opposed to metric system?

I really appreciate what you're doing and wanted to thank you.


:p

[ May 09, 2001: Message edited by: pooh ]
 
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