Are there jobs or food service organizations that basically work 8 hours for a shift?

Discussion in 'After Culinary School' started by gopastry, Jan 10, 2018.

  1. gopastry

    gopastry

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    I decided to go to college to study baking and pastry when I was 49. I am 51 now. I’ve started to work at a bakery one and half months ago as an intern. I work at pm shift that starts at 10:30am and supposes off at 6:30pm (with half hour rest for lunch), but the reality is that I always have to work overtime every shift for at least 9 hours sometimes 11 hours with standing, that not including the rest time.

    I understand that I am a freshman in the food service industry so that I have to do all the manual labour including the cleaning at the end of shift. A lot of physical work but fortunately I haven’t got sick and been late to work so far. I am healthy but not young. I don’t think that I can do a job involved hard physical work like this constantly for another 5 years or even 10 years.

    I have never worked for restaurants or hotels. I wonder if there are jobs or food service organizations that basically work 8 hours for a shift (not including time for rest) and won’t work overtime all the time. Actually, I don’t mind work overtime as long as not every shift. It is ok for me occasionally.

    I wish I could get some information here for reference for searching job after intern. Thanks.
     
  2. Pat Pat

    Pat Pat

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    It's always going to be a physical job working in the kitchen.

    From what you described, I am assuming that you probably aren't aspire to become a top pastry chef. In this case, there are a lot of options to suit you.

    If you want an easy 8-hour shift, you can work at a small café, a supermarket, or a school.

    If you want a harder but still an 8-hour shift, you can try a hospital, a casino, or a big hotel.
     
  3. Iceman

    Iceman

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    F I.jpg
     
    drirene and chefross like this.
  4. chefross

    chefross

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    Check out hotels that are part of a corporation.. (Hyatt, Marriott, Embassy Suites) Some have pastry Chefs.
    Other idea, college food service, airline, conference centers...Some utilize house made products.
     
  5. Chef_Aaron_B

    Chef_Aaron_B

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    Hospitals might be a good fit. Definitely more work regulations then independent operations.
     
  6. jimyra

    jimyra

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    Fast food chains. Grocery stores.
     
  7. Beltway Chef

    Beltway Chef

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    I would try a small independent restaurant or café. You might work like a 6-7 hour shift and for the most part they aren't going to want to get stuck paying overtime and things like that.
     
  8. doraima3875

    doraima3875

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    Work at Hospitals, Hotels and other catering services like Gluckenheimer, Bon Appetit, Aramark and other related fine dining and restaurant group companies. This is probably best to work for 8-hour shifts in my opinion. If you work at independent restaurants - they may ask for you to work overtime, if necessary.
     
  9. capricciosa

    capricciosa

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    A grocery store bakery is probably the best bet. It's still physical, and the hours aren't always 9-5, but most grocery stores (especially Wal-Mart) hate the word overtime.
     
  10. dc1346

    dc1346

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    You could try teaching. If you're in the States and have a Bachelor's degree you could check out alternative education certification routes by talking to the certification department at your state's Department of Education. You could also try teaching at a community college. There are also adult community education programs that are sometimes run through non-profits that offer culinary training programs to diverse groups that include ex-convicts, troubled youth, etc.

    If you have culinary skills beyond cooking and baking, you could free lance as a personal chef. This would allow you to pick and choose jobs and if you were successful, you could build up a loyal clientele many of whom would have set schedules.

    I went into the food service industry when I was 41. In 2005, I literally worked all but three days of that entire year. Not only did I pull 84+ hour weeks but there were times when I'd be on the closing shift for one day and then the opening shift for the next day.

    I wouldn't have minded so much if I had been an hourly wage earner ... but since I was under contract and since my contract specified a minimum of 50 hours a week, my employer felt free to exploit me.

    I could have moved on to another job but I wound up going the alternative certification route and I now teach Culinary Arts at a rural high school.

    I'm being paid about 60% more than when I worked in the food service industry. My daily work schedule runs from 7:30 AM to 2:45 PM, Mondays through Friday.