Featured Apprenticeship advice

Discussion in 'General Culinary School Discussions' started by kullboys, Jan 12, 2018.

  1. kullboys

    kullboys

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    kullboys
    Hi everyone. I'm an 2nd year apprentice chef. About 9 months ago, I had to leave my apprenticeship.
    I was doing an apprenticeship that was in-house training. This meant that, my theoretical work was done like correspondence and the practical training was done within-house. I wasn't school trained.
    I completed my 1st year without any problems. Half way through my 2nd year, I had a change of head chef and some of the other chefs left the kitchen. My practical training stopped. I continued working hard and completed my theoretical work. I was told by the head chef that I had to train myself in the practical work, either at home or looking stuff up online. It was either that, or I leave, as he didn't have time to train me. By this time, 6 months of my second year had passed, and I hadn't had 6 months worth of practical training. The type a normal apprentice got if they went to school. I tried to teach myself, but given the choice of teaching myself, or leaving, I chose to leave because I wouldn't have been shown the correct training if I'd taught myself.
    I love cooking. My question is directed to any chefs or head chefs that can answer my question. Is it worth continuing on with my apprenticeship, seeing as I've missed so much training, or should I repeat the second year? The thing is, I've done all my theoretical work and gained the certificate from school. I just lack all the training that you receive at school for the subjects.
    I ask again, is it worth me continuing on in my apprenceship, seeing as I'm 40 years old, or should I just call it a quits. I'm not sure what to do as I love cooking.
    Thanks
     
  2. Whatsburning

    Whatsburning

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    Chef
    School of hard knocks. Work at a place till you feel like youve either grown too contemptful to work there or youve accomplished the goals that you set for yourself at said place. If your new to the game work hard, keep your head down, keep your eyes WIDE open and your mouth shut unless "yes chef" is coming out of it. If you made it 2 years and havent OD or gone to jail, havent been thrown out of the kitchen,and still enjoy it......youre probably ment for this life.
     
  3. chefwriter

    chefwriter

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    Professional Cook
    I get the impression that you are not in the United States. We don't have apprenticeships here so I don't know how much of an impact that will have on your resume, whether you finished or not. I also am not familiar with correspondence theoretical training versus practical. If you have the certificate, then what would you continue on with?
    Generally speaking my advice is to find a good, large hotel to work in. They will do line cooking, catering, banquets, buffets and room service so you will get exposure to many types of food production.
    As for theoretical, get a few cookbooks. There are plenty recommended in different threads here in ChefTalk. Cooking offers much to learn and not every place will offer the opportunity to experience all of it.
    Two years is nothing more than a good start. Don't quit now. Your age really isn't important. The attitude you bring to work is. Like whatsburning said, eyes open/mouth shut-work hard.
    And before I forget, being shown the right way can be tricky. The first chef shows you his "correct" way. In a future job, that may not be the "correct" way for whoever you happen to be working for. So as the years go by, you learn the "right' way to do many things from many different cooks/chefs. Over time, you begin to understand the difference between the generally accepted way to do something and the "correct" way according to whoever you happen to be working for. So be prepared to be shown how to do something you have already been shown how to do. Just listen and soak it in. You can sort it out later.
     
  4. sgmchef

    sgmchef

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    I echo chefwriters thoughts including the supposition that you are not in the states. I could not work in Germany because I don't have a valid piece of paper! So... If you MUST have that piece of paper, I would approach the office that issues the required papers and ask what establishments have an active training program. If one of those is near, there is a possible solution.

    You have the most important part already. You have passion! I have worked with people that have certificates and very nice pieces of paper, but no passion. Their food tasted like they didn't care because they didn't have that love of cooking.

    Good luck with your future!