Apprentice Chef?

Discussion in 'General Culinary School Discussions' started by riderc90, Feb 9, 2014.

  1. riderc90

    riderc90

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    So I have heard of this type of thing but have never seen a job posting or anything seeking an apprentice chef. What exactly is it? How do you find such positions? Is it a productive alternative to culinary school?
     
  2. alacarte

    alacarte

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    Are u kidding u dont know what an apprentice is?? Maybe were your from its different, in Australia to becoma a qualified proffessiona chef you must undertake an apprenticeship, this is paid on the job learning, so it used to take 4 years to complete, now it has been reduced to 3 years, so you find a busy restuarant or resort to hire you and you work ad an apprentice directly under the head chef and sous chef, and the other qualifoed chefs, you start at the bottom of the kitchen hierachy, often for the first year you do medial tasks like washing lettuce, cutting vegetables, then progress to basic cooking like mash potato, stocks, sauces etc.. then second year you get put incharge of a section were you learn to assemble dishes to order, ordering, costing etc.. (usually start with cold larder and deserts, then progressing to harder sections like pans and grill) during your three years work in the kitchen you also attend a culinary school which is called TAFE were they teach you further skills that you may not have the opportunity to learn in the kitchen. Then after you complete all your modules and the.chef is happy to sign you off, you are now a qualified chef. Wages for apprentices are: 1st year is 10.50 / hour, 2nd year is 12.90? And 3rd year is about 14-15 dollars per hour.. a chef strait after finishing thier apprenticeship is usually hired as a commis chef and the wage is about $21 an hour, then after more experiance you would be hired as a demi chef, chef de partie, sous chef, chef de guisine then the head chef or (executive in hotels). The low wage is subsidised by the government depending on your age and living arangements they can pay you up.to an extra 100-150 dollars a week, not from your employers pocket but the.governments, and the tafe (certificate III in commercial cookery) is paid.for by the government and also your employer. To.do it privately is around $12000 a year i believe.. during the course of your apprenticeship.the government also gives you a tax free "tools of.the.trade allowance" totalling $5500 to buy.knives and uniforms.etc.. this is divided in sums of about 1200 periodically throu the.course of your training.
     
  3. mikeswoods

    mikeswoods

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    The apprenticeship model does not exist here in the USA---in Canada and the UK, I believe ,  they have a certification that requires schooling and an apprenticeship--

    Great way to train a worker in a real world environment---I do not believe that system exists here--to bad.
     
  4. william kuch

    william kuch

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    The US has ACF apprenticeship programs which are probably pretty comparable. Although there is not an ACF group in every state, I would recommend it to anyone considering culinary school
     
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  5. foodpump

    foodpump

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    ACF credentials are nice, but are they Gov't recognised?
     
  6. riderc90

    riderc90

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    Alacarte - my god how I wish we had something of that sort here. There are apprenticeship programs. But they certainly aren't as extensive as that not do they receive the funding from the government. I truly wish that we did because that is exactly what I want. :,(
     
  7. alacarte

    alacarte

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    yes its quite a good system they have in place, not just for culinary, but a broad range of trades, it works well for a youth strait out of high school 17, still living at home with the parents or move into a share house with mates, u can easily afford to live on $400/week and you will be a fully trade qualified chef when your 20. they also offer a "school based apprenticeship" which in year 11 or 12 if the kid dont have much interest in school the government sets up a prgram were you only need to attend school 3 days a week and you also work part time and over 12 months, that is counted as the first year done, so they can still qualify and get their high school certificate and also go strait into the second year as an apprentice. not bad head start to life.
     
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  8. chefross

    chefross

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    We don't have apprenticeships here in the USA because the culinary field is not recognized as a legitimate profession here.

    (insert any adjective you wish here...........)
     
  9. alacarte

    alacarte

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    It doesnt make sense tho, like eating food goes hand in hand with surviving.... lol
     
  10. william kuch

    william kuch

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    Not sure how you can say its not recognized as a true profession. Yet we somehow seem to have all these cooking shows and celebrity chefs? Your comment sounds quite ignorant sir
     
  11. soesje

    soesje

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    I think what you are describing as an apprenticeship like above, is pretty unique for YOUR country.

    I live in netherlands and through we do have apprenticeships, we still have to pay for school ourselves mostly (esp when over 30 years old) and definitely don't receive what your government gives you.

    LUCKY you.

    school over here costs 600/ 700 euros a year for younger people and 3000 euros a year for adults (over 20).

    getting degrees for youngsters takes two years to complete, for adults one year.

    there are apprenticeships as that school WANTS YOU to have a workplace that qualifies to particular registrations, and they work together to get your assignments done/ signed/ etc whatever is needed.

    I'd be interested though what it is like in other countries regarding rules/ costs etc.

    but a chef/ cook is most definitely  recognized as a legitimate profession over here!! 
     
  12. ishbel

    ishbel

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    The UK has an apprenticeship scheme, I think the Aussie System is based upon it. I think NZ has a similar scheme. It is not just for culinary skills though... Plumbing, brick laying. Carpentry, motor mechanics, various engineering skills, oh and hairdressing, are all offered as apprenticeships.

    Students are employed by a business and either attend FE college as day release students or block release, in Australia the classes are usually held at TAFEs.

    The apprenticeship scheme in the UK has had a small resurgence after being dickered around with for a couple of decades. After all, something that has been part of our training
    systems since medieval times must be doing something right!:D

    Here's a link to a govt site https://www.gov.uk/apprenticeships-guide
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2014
  13. william kuch

    william kuch

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    In my opinion its a skilled trade just like any other. To say its not recognized as such in the USA is like saying a mechanic is not recognized as a true profession. Still waiting for the other guy to respond so he can elaborate on his ignorant comment.
     
  14. foodpump

    foodpump

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    Fair question:

    What Gov't or state-wide recognised standards/and/or qualifications are there for the profession of "Cook"?
     
  15. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    Second "fair question":

    What standard body of common knowledge encompasses all cooks?
     
  16. wlong

    wlong

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    Where there is state or government assistance, guess who pays for it. 
     
  17. william kuch

    william kuch

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    Ahh see now I get where you're coming from. Technically there really aren't any when you put it that way. No type of real tests or certifications you "must" have or pass. Maybe this is why you never truly get paid what you deserve. I do apologize, as I am quite prideful when it comes to what I do for a living. Sorry if I seemed like a dick
     
  18. emmbai90

    emmbai90

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    An apprentice is just like a job except most likely only 2 days a week plus 1 day a week training at your local college, you will get payed (here in the UK £96 - £99 week), if you live near a college that also gives students placements during their courses then most likely they will put apprenticeships on the website too plus you can ask the college if they can get you into one, here in the UK we can ether do an Apprenticeship or an NVQ from Level 1, NVQ is still an apprenticeship but instead it's a better way to let employers know your a reliable worker. The college here also sends someone out from the college (most likely a placement officer), and they check how your doing there once a week and you also get a booklet with things you go through related to it, plus a reference from the employer, so try and find out if the college near you does that.
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2014
  19. nicko

    nicko Founder of Cheftalk.com Staff Member

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    That one I don't agree with. It is a recognized profession and if it wasn't there would not be literally thousands of culinary schools across the country and everyone changing careers to become a chef.

    The apprenticeship programs in Europe always made more sense to me because it was a more through process of learning the trade. The closest thing I have seen in the US is a vocational tech school that I visited in Delaware. @Jim Berman  can comment on it. Basically the students start the program as freshman and are hand selected. The spend 3 years I believe learning every aspect of the kitchen and from what I saw they got so much more than what you get in the "quick fix I want to be a chef" 2 year culinary programs that are so prevalent at a lot of schools. If you want to gain a similar experience you can do what I did which was an "estage" in Europe.

    @alacarte  That sounds like an extremely well thought out program and there really is nothing quite like that here in the US. Do you know if the apprentice program is similar in Europe? I know they have apprenticeship programs but I don't know if they are as detailed about wages, trade tool allowances etc etc. That really is an amazing program. So where are you working now and what stage of your apprenticeship are you in?
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2014
  20. michaelga

    michaelga

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    umm...

    I have to disagree Nicko.

    Electricians are a recognized trade... but you don't see hundreds of Electrician schools.   You don't see them precisely because you need to 'apprentice' in order to get a license.   You can take the courses but you can't open a business until you have completed the 'apprenticeship'. (varies by state and country) 

    There are thousands of 'culinary' schools precisely because of the fact that it isn't a recognized profession ... there is no common body of knowledge, there is no supervised and recorded apprenticeship.  There is no 'bar' so as to speak when talking about lawyers.

    Anyone can open a restaurant or call themselves a chef and nobody can prevent them.   Anyone who advertises their services as an Electrician will be toast if they don't have the schooling and licenses (ie. completed apprenticeship)
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2014