Anyone settle this debate?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by Gone A., Jun 22, 2018.

  1. Gone A.

    Gone A.

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    Brewery beer cooler, holds beer and kegs, can you put food in same cooler? We're kind of split on this
     
  2. sgsvirgil

    sgsvirgil

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    Sure. Why not? If that's what you have to work with. The only reason I can think of as to why you could not store them together is if your local health laws prohibited it for some reason.

    But, with all thing being equal, the real question is why would you want to?
     
  3. jasimo

    jasimo

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    no problem, as long as long it is vermin proof and at temp for food stuff as required per label.
     
  4. Gone A.

    Gone A.

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    Thanks! I don't think it's a local issue either. Our walk in for food is 1/6 the size of the beer cooler, and it's very old and needs serviced often. New awesome chef says screw that noise, we're claiming a corner, lol.
     
  5. capricciosa

    capricciosa

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    Assuming the food is ready-to-eat (salads, veg, sauces/condiments), I see no issue. Just no raw meat
     
  6. jasimo

    jasimo

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    thanks bro as you say in us, take care.
     
  7. Pat Pat

    Pat Pat

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    At most places I worked at, the kegs shared a space in the walk-in with the rest of the food.
     
  8. chefwriter

    chefwriter

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    Capricciosa. I'm curious as to why you say no raw meat? Is a beer cooler kept above 40 degrees F? I have no idea.
    As long as the kegs/beer are kept separate from the food and standard storage practices are followed (raw chicken on bottom shelf, etc.)I don't see why only cooked food can be kept in the beer cooler.
    Now because Gone A. has two coolers, I can see keeping the raw in one and prepped in the other just because there's an option. But otherwise, as long as proper procedures are followed, I can't see a connection between beer in kegs and/or bottles and raw food.
     
  9. jasimo

    jasimo

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    Hello Chefwriter, i agree with you, kegs are at 0 to 5 c temp same as raw meat are held at, only ales are held at 10 to18 c, so not a place to store raw or any cooked items.
     
  10. riffwraith

    riffwraith

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    Not if the beer is not in bottles nor a keg. :p
     
  11. maryb

    maryb

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    No raw meat above the beer. PERIOD. Any blood that drips could contaminate a beer line or bottle top and cause illness...
     
  12. capricciosa

    capricciosa

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    Valid point, and I guess it depends on the size/set-up of the beer cooler. In the restaurant I work in, the keg room is too miniscule to prevent cross-contamination. To some extent, my attitude about raw meat is probably a hold-over from the years I spent in retail food service where every department (meat, deli, bakery, etc) had its own walk-in and there were strict rules about what went where. I recognize that's just not possible in most restaurants, but I guess it's just a habit.
     
  13. someday

    someday

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    Not blood. The liquid coming out of raw meat is not blood. Animals are bled at the time of slaughter. There may be *trace* amounts but that is about it. If it was blood it would be thick, and blackish looking.

    Sorry to nitpick, I'm on a quixotic quest to rid the world of this false belief.
     
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  14. jasimo

    jasimo

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    Your are right and near to perfectionism, its plasma, still blood but no white or red blood cells contain glucose and platelets, thats why is is sticky. still contains last remaining nutriment, then they are ineffectual, bacteria takes over and still a risk. take care jasimo
     
  15. french fries

    french fries

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    I don't think that's true... I'm pretty sure it's only water with myoglobin.
     
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  16. sgsvirgil

    sgsvirgil

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  17. jasimo

    jasimo

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    your are right, myoglobin is present in muscle tissue, after slaughter, but still contains hemoglobin both are carried by plasma, i should have been more concise sorry, water is the main conduct, still a main cause of bacterial infection as they are aerobic imminent pathogens.