Anyone here serious about Indian food cooking? I want to get into it, but it's challenging

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by lasagnaburrito, Aug 24, 2015.

  1. lasagnaburrito

    lasagnaburrito

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    Hello all,

    Indian Food is probably tops when it comes to what type of culture/ethnical food I'm looking at.

    One thing I've noticed is it's very hard to reproduce the awesome flavor, though.  Sauces, frozen foods, etc have a really hard time mimicking it.  I also have cookbooks and we have tried cooking here, at home, but it's still not the same as if I was going to a good Indian Restaurant.

    so I wanted to know if there was anyone in here that is an Indian Chef or cooks Indian food well and maybe had some points and such for me?


    I would greatly appreciate any input, and help!

    Thank you so much everyone!
     
  2. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    I love Indian food and have a few cookbooks, but I have to admit I'm not very knowledgeable.  I would love to take a few classes somewhere and get some pointers.  I do make a lot of "Indian" inspired dishes but because I am not that comfortable with the cuisine I hate to actually call them Indian dishes.
     
  3. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    It's a pretty broad category but a few things that come to mind are...

    Don't buy spice mixes such as curry powder. Make your own. Use whole spices. Dry roast until the start to give wisps of smoke or slightly start to pop. Let cool slightly and grind in a mortar and pestle.

    Tarka (seasoned oil). Get your oil very hot, drop in whole spices in order of cooking time such as chilies last because they burn quickly. The spices will pop and sizzle and get intense really quickly. Just takes a few seconds. Foods cooked in this seasoned oil will naturally pick up the heightened flavor of the spices, but sometimes tarkas are used as a finishing point.

    When making an onion based paste be sure to get your onions dark brown (not crisp or burned). The more caramel produced by browning the onions, the richer the resultant paste.