Anyone here made Phyllo/Fillo Dough from scratch?

Discussion in 'Pastries & Baking' started by mudbug, Dec 9, 2000.

  1. mudbug

    mudbug

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    Despite what you may think, no, I'm not [​IMG] crazy [​IMG] . I've always wanted to try this. I DO have recipes. My question is, has anyone here at the cafe tried this themselves. If yes, did you store it for future use? If so, how did you store it? Maybe let it dry a little and flour it so as to layer the sheets? Thoughts, opinions welcome...
     
  2. lynne

    lynne

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    Cchiu,

    I've made phyllo five times. End product; is good, but different from store bought phyllo. I like it for strudels, but not for phyllo wrapped h'ors d'oeuvre-type things. The homemade product is just going to be heavier, but makes an awesome pan-spanikopita (v. the little flag-fold triangles. Honestly, I'd just buy it - (coming from the woman with 5 boxes thawing in the cooler!--Dinner party with phyllo wrapped chicken)

    If you attempt it, I wish you a huge, flat countertop/work table and plenty of patience. If you have some one to pull with you, it can be good bonding.

    Freezing - I wasn't happy with the thawed frozen product.
    Have fun!

    [This message has been edited by lynne (edited 12-11-2000).]
     
  3. mudbug

    mudbug

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    lynne,

    Well, I've got four boxes including the shredded phyllo - have you worked with that?

    Also, I've never seen the "stretching" part of it, any tips? Some of the phyllo recipes I have ask that you flatten it with the palm of your hand, others say to roll it out with a rolling pin. Some have oil, some don't. Have you tried different ingredient recipes? Which kind did you use?
     
  4. lynne

    lynne

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    Shredded Phyllo:

    Baked pears stuffed with gorgonzola, wrapped in shredded phyllo, served w/raspberry sauce.

    Citrus marinated shrimp wrapped in shredded phyllo served with a mango sauce

    Of course there are phyllo nests dusted with cinnamon and 10X combo, filled with fruits and topped w/whipped cream (a la Pavlova)

    Seafood "pot pie" (OK, I've used the term loosely) with a shredded phyllo topping instead of a true crust.

    I've seen a "salmon wellington" where the salmon was wrapped in a sheet of phyllo which was "decorated" with shredded phyllo and baked.

    Butter/cinnamon sugared makes an interesting custard topping

    Wonderful for height on all kinds of platings. Just sprinkle with seaoning of choice; Chinese 5 spice, cajun, cinnamon,
     
  5. lynne

    lynne

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    Shredded Phyllo:

    Baked pears stuffed with gorgonzola, wrapped in shredded phyllo, served w/raspberry sauce.

    Citrus marinated shrimp wrapped in shredded phyllo served with a mango sauce

    Of course there are phyllo nests dusted with cinnamon and 10X combo, filled with fruits and topped w/whipped cream (a la Pavlova)

    Seafood "pot pie" (OK, I've used the term loosely) with a shredded phyllo topping instead of a true crust.

    I've seen a "salmon wellington" where the salmon was wrapped in a sheet of phyllo which was "decorated" with shredded phyllo and baked.

    Butter/cinnamon sugared makes an interesting custard topping

    Wonderful for height on all kinds of platings. Just sprinkle with seaoning of choice; Chinese 5 spice, cajun, cinnamon,
     
  6. lynne

    lynne

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    Oops!

    The best phyllo dough recipe I've found (had some others that friends made too, but I think this is better) is actually the Strudel Dough Recipe from Practical Baking, 5th edition by William J. Sultan. The directions sound pompous but I think it's probably the best explanation of how to proceed.

    Recipe wise, this is very similar to another that a friend uses, but this one tends to be more consistent with results.

    Have fun!


    2 # water
    3 oz. sugar
    1/2 oz. salt
    4 each eggs
    6 oz. oil
    3# 4 oz. high gluten bread flour

    Dissolve sugar and salt in the water, oil and eggs. Sift, add flour, and develop to a smooth dough.

    Be sure dough is well developed. Divide into 3 parts.

    Shape into oblongs with a smooth surface as is done for a pan bread. Place the dough into rectangular bread pans that have been brushed with oil. Brush top of dough with oil to prevent formation of crust.

    The dough may be allowed to relax for 1 hour at room temp or overnight in cooler. This dough may be refrigerated for several days and used. (I think it's easier to work with after relaxing for an hour and at room temp).

    Cover bench or table with a canvas or other straight cloth which you have dusted with bread flour to prevent the dough from sticking.

    Remove dough from pan with both hands and stretch between the hands before allowing it to rest on the cloth. Starting from the center of the dough, grasp the opposite edges of the dough and stretch the dough gently by lifting the edges of the dough slightly and pulling towards the outside of the cloth. Remember to lift gently and pull to the outside of the cloth and the extreme edges of the table. Allow the dough to relax a bit if it tends to resist pulling or springs back too much after being pulled. Keep stretching the dough until the entire cloth and table are covered. At this point the dough should be transparent.

    Use immediately.
     
  7. mezzaluna

    mezzaluna

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    Craig Claiborne has a phyllo recipe in his New York Times cookbook from the 70's. It's completely illustrated with photos, so you can see the process. I've never made it, though. I've also never worked with kataifi (shredded phyllo)- is it difficult? The pastries are delicious...
     
  8. shroomgirl

    shroomgirl

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    Go Girl! homemade phyllo
    Nick Malgeari must have a recipe because in one of his earlier pastry classes (8-10 years ago) he demonstrated strudel dough....actually that was a winter strudel macerated dried fruit with a pastry cream filling...ummmmmm....
    Fillo is difficult, if you can locate a source for fresh Apollo it is wonderful they have thick and thin sheets. Athenian Imports on Clayton at Big Bend sells it. Much better than frozen not as good as the store in SF>
     
  9. chichi

    chichi

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    you don't have to be crazy to try phyllo dough from scratch, it is much better than store bought,

    of course, making phyllo dough or the shredded phyllo dough is only for Arabs they are born with the knowledge, the skill and the taste for it.

    sorry guys.   from a little piece of dough you have to stretch it to the pan size with patience and love if not you break it with your nails,   but I can assure you it is worth it.
     
  10. chichi

    chichi

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    Sorry, strudel dough and phyllo dough are two different things.
     
    jennifer.hebert likes this.
  11. petalsandcoco

    petalsandcoco

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     Chichi...

    phyllo dough is one of those items I would rather buy. Making the dough is nothing , its making the sheets without tearing them.

    I saw this video made in Greece and after watching it ....well I have such a respect for those men making it.



    It is almost an art to make it the way they do.
     
  12. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Having made both puff pastry and phyllo once each, they're easier to make and stretch without tearing than you'd imagine.