Anyone have suggestions on the labor of building out a space?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by gobblygook, Oct 8, 2010.

  1. gobblygook

    gobblygook

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    First problem is zero lot line, but the gubbermint seems to believe I need a 1500 gallon grease trap/interceptor.  It's impossible to put one of these in the ground.  I'm used to seeing the smaller grease traps that fit under the sink, but they're wanting something 4'x8'.  Any ideas?

    Second, is hanging a vent hood (the hood, not the hole-cutting in the roof and all that jazz) difficult?  As anyone who's ever been through it can attest, build-out is horribly expensive and I'd love to save costs wherever possible. 
     
  2. foodpump

    foodpump

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    Gub-mint?

    Usually it's the municipality you live in that sets the criteria for restaurants.

    Most every place I've been in, they seem to want a MINimum of a 55 gallon grease interceptor.  There's usually a forumula to calculate the size, so many gallons for every pot sink, floor drain, etc, but the min seems to be at 55 gallon.  This is nothing more than a 4' x 3'' box with an inlet, an outlet,  bunch of baffles, and a tight-fittng lid.  Works on the principal that grease floats on top, so you have to get the "honey dipper" dude to suck out the trap every couple of months.  The dirty, grease free water goes into municipalities sanitary lines.  I've been know to install one of these suckers after a Fri. night service. Not hard to do at all.    Don't know nuthin' about leaching ponds......

    Hanging a hood isn't all that difficult. Hilti in some redi-rods to the cieling and hang the sucker.  Hood is nothing more than a s/s box with a bunch of filters, and usually you can get these used.

    The money comes in designing the system......

    Most muncipialities demand a mechanical engineer's set of drawings for the hood.  This includes detailed sections of the shaft-- the tube that sucks out the dirty air: How many hours it's fire rated for, is it mounted on a combustible surface, where the fire suppression nozzles are located in the plenum, where the extraction fans are located, how many cfm they can remove.  Then there's the make-up air, can't go sucking up dirty air and not replacing it.  Where is the make-up air fan located?  Most municipalities demand that this air be "tempered", that is air conditioned in the summer, and heated in the winter.  You can shop around for quotes on the HVAC instalation stuff, but the mech. eng. rubber stamp will still cost you.

    Once the hood is in place, then you got to have your fire supression system, or as you guys south of the border call it, the "Ansul" system.  Figure on a minimum of 4 grand.  There's a code and formula too: So many nozzles  for each piece of equipment.  I've done one kitchen with salvaged parts like the bottle, hand pull switch, and various bits and pieces, but the money is in the installation, and you gotta have a qualified guy for that.

    9 times out of 10 it is more pactical to find a filthy, p.o.s. restaurant, give it a bath and shave it's armpits, than it is to build one from scratch.

    Oh....

    And then there's the parking........................ 
     
  3. gobblygook

    gobblygook

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    I don't get the idea behind heating and cooling the make-up air.  As I understand it, the make-up air is 80% of the cfm of the exhaust fan.  The idea is that the air comes in, sucks up some other stuff, and goes back out.  Why heat and cool air that I'm just exhausting anyway? 

    Parking isn't an issue, fortunately.  However, the fire suppression system is certainly a PITA.  The problem is that the filthy POS restaurants around here are pre-code anyway, so all I'll end up with is something that's not up to code and go through the same BS. 

    What's a Hilti?  I know it's a brand, but are you talking about a hammer-drill or something else?  I assume a "redi-rod" is what we rednecks call "all-thread" -- a long threaded rod?

    The fire part is the killer on the venthood.  Between a manual fire pull, the auto-extinguish, the gas disconnect, and all that jazz, I'll go bankrupt. 
     
  4. foodpump

    foodpump

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    The heated/a/c air is usually a municiapl thing.  If you pull in fresh air into the kitchen on a nice hot humid August day, the kitchen gets even more nice and toasty, vicy-versy on a January day.  Some municipalities will let it slide, some won't.

    Hilti is brand of fastner and tools, made in Lichtenstein, I think.  You drill a hole in cement, pop in a fastner, and as you tighten up the sucker it expands and holds tight.  Most of the plumbing you see suspended in underground parking lots and buildigs are done this way.

    Redi-rod/all thread, it's the same stuff, 1/2 or 5/8" should do the trick.

    Again, check with you municipality on Grandfather clauses.  Most have some kind of a formula where if your proposed renovations don't exceed a certain % of the building value, you don't have to meet certain code requirements.  Go a penny over that value, and they want you  to meet every code.  What a lot of places do is make renovations very gradually, slowly building up the place's value.

    The fire supression is just that.  Gotta have it or the Fire marshall will be all over you, your insurance won't cover, and the landlord will want you out.  The bigger the hood, the bigger the system, the more appliances you have under the hood, the more nozzles you need.  No one said you couldn't do it in stages though....

    If parking is covered than you're halfway there. 

    OTOH If your State's liquor laws are anywhere as idiotic and archaic as ours, then you need a good stiff drink to figure out how to get the license