Anyone have knowledge of over the range microwaves with convection/toaster oven features?

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I've always had a toaster oven in the kitchen. Living alone it doesn't make sense to turn on the oven to reheat a couple slices of pizza, but there are certain foods that simply do not reheat in a microwave very well. So toward the end of the year I am considering replacing my current over the range microwave with something that has the toaster and convection roasting abilities. I could get rid of the toaster oven and depending on how well it worked for roasting and baking I could see it becoming more useful to me than the large oven for many things.

I've looked around and seen some interesting features. Some of them have the ability to steam. But I have not seen any that appeared to have actual toasting elements unless those are hidden behind the convection fans. If you've seen the commercial toaster microwaves that places like Subway use, I was thinking it would be ideal to get something that could function like that.

So I thought I'd ask the cheftalk community if any of you have experience with such an appliance? The ones I've found so far look to be between $400 and $600. The higher priced units don't appear to have any additional cooking utility but have things like mobile apps, smart features, sensors (like a sound sensor for popcorn.. which is just about useless to me).
 
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Take this for whatever you think it's worth, but my opinion is the only thing that belongs over a range is an outdoor ducted ventilation hood. There are microwaves that have a recirculating non-vented hood (which are crap). I doubt that any combo unit you are thinking about would come in that configuration but with consumer stuff I could be wrong, but that doesn't make them any good.

Those countertop combo microwave/convection ovens you mention are big$$$.

You might want to look at a countertop convection oven like this https://www.webstaurantstore.com/avantco-co-16-half-size-countertop-convection-oven-1-5-cu-ft-120v-1600w/177CO16 120.html
 
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Almost no homes that I have ever been in have ventilation hoods going to the outside. I've seen that discussion before, but we're not talking about a complete kitchen remodel here. It would just be replacing the existing over the range microwave which has a ventilation (re-circulation) fan w/ grease traps. The home is 10 years old and there is no sign of issues with grease in the kitchen. Thanks for the input though.
 
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I get the concept of over the range microwaves being space saving, but that idea is not a good one. Stuff spills and drops, and when it drops onto your range, it's not good-especially if you have a burner on.

When we moved into our home last year we had a micro/fan unit over the stove, it was from Ikea. Even though it was ducted to an outside vent, it was useless as a fan, and it collected grease

Most n.american household ventilation hoods are garbage, even the expensive ones. The issue is those flat 1/4" thick screens that theoritically absorbs grease. Just plain stupid, you need gallons of hot water to clean them, and then they aren't effective. It costs too much to replace them every two months, so what do you do?

The Asian style of ventilation hood has two semi exposed fans. Each fan has a drip cup underneath, as well as a drip cup at the back. You just remove the drip cups, clean out the grease, and it's done.
 
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Almost no homes that I have ever been in have ventilation hoods going to the outside. I've seen that discussion before, but we're not talking about a complete kitchen remodel here. It would just be replacing the existing over the range microwave which has a ventilation (re-circulation) fan w/ grease traps. The home is 10 years old and there is no sign of issues with grease in the kitchen. Thanks for the input though.

I understand that you don't want to make drastic changes but don't make a bad situation worse. I find it the height of stupidity that building codes require ventilation fans is bathrooms and are very specific about size and how they are to be vented to the outside. Yet nothing is required for kitchens where there's much more of an issue with water vapor and even more importantly with carbon monoxide. Funny too how everybody talks about the dangers of a blocked vent on a gas water heater and how the CO can kill, but nobody considers that a typical gas range can have even more BTUs and is vented nowhere.

I know I'm just ranting here and I can't see you doing anything different at this point. But please don't take the attitude that that's the way the house was built so it must be OK. Just because some cheap ass builder did it that way doesn't make it right- or safe. Next time you look to buy a house you'll know better.
 
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I know I'm just ranting here and I can't see you doing anything different at this point. But please don't take the attitude that that's the way the house was built so it must be OK. Just because some cheap ass builder did it that way doesn't make it right- or safe. Next time you look to buy a house you'll know better.

I don't disagree with you at all. I will say that it is likely a regional thing though. I live in FL and we have almost no natural gas services. Those that do have gas appliances tend to have in ground tanks and have to have companies come out and fill them up. Gas seems to be extremely common with states in the North whereas most homes in Florida are completely electric (kitchen, hot water heater, heat pump, etc.)
 
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Electric ranges do not negate the requirement for proper ventilation. You don't have CO to consider but you still have fumes and water vapor that carry throughout the house. Shame on any builder that cuts corners with one of those microwave/vent hood things. Not only are they a PITA to replace they should be illegal.
 
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I have one of these next to the kitchen (open floor model) and it auto senses the air .. so I do know your point about the vapors and oil is legitimate. It will crank up to 100% and filter the air if I am hard frying something or sometimes just from doing something like sweating vegetables. It's better than nothing.

lowes-air-purifier.jpg
 

phatch

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Continuing with the ventilation hijack, you do have some options for ducting most likely. Above or at the top of some cabinets to reach an exterior wall, up through some wall to reach the roof. These aren't major remodel jobs necessarily and the ventialtion is worth it imo.

I did a full kitchen remodel 20 years ago and added an exterior venting hood. So glad I did. As to the grease mesh plates mentioned by foodpump, mine go in the dishwasher and clean up well in that method in just a regular load of dishes.

My home is from the 40s and not as airtight as modern construction so recovery air was not such a big concern. I've made a number of other improvements over those years that improve my thermal efficiency and when I redo my HVAC next, I'll address it then.
 
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I have to step in on eastshores eastshores defense. Florida is an entirely different animal in house construction. We get these things called hurricanes. You want as little openings in the roof as possible. Like he said, almost all kitchens in FL are electric and recirculate vent stovetop (newer ones can have some good filtration). There are actually a lot of bathrooms that only vent to the attic.

As far as the actual question. I had a GE Profile convection microwave combo from 2005. The convection oven worked great, but took as long to preheat and used more energy than the regular oven (even though that was convection too). Baked goods did cook better in it though. I would use it mostly for big holiday gatherings.

The newer convection/mictowave hybrids I believe are better now, but I have not personally used one. I would consider getting another
 
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Hi planethoff,

Here in Vancouver we get a lot of rain, a lot... Clothes dryers, kitchen and bathroom fans are almost always vented through the walls, some through the soffits, but mostly through the walls. What I'm trying to say is that there is no need to vent through the roof, the shortest and best route is through the walls
 
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