Anyone familiar with Imperial Mighty Oak knives?

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I'm having a fight with my insurance company about theft replacements. Can anyone tell me what the modern day equivalent would be for Imperial Mighty Oak knives? Many thanks.

I had:
10" carving
9" bread
9.25" french chef
boning
 
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What is the fight about? What did they sell for new? What would that be in today's dollars?
I found a bunch for sale on Ebay. You might find yours there if the thief is selling them.
 
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Generally the fight is over the difference between original acquisition cost (especially when one tries adjusting for today’s dollar), residual/current value, and replacement cost... or the value of sentimental value. Getting made whole by insurance after a loss is often an emotional roller coaster.

In this case replacement seems easy and very affordable.
 
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Since the knives do not appear to be collectible or unique in any way, "comparables" could be any knives of similar cost sold at any store like Target etc. From the offerings that I have seen online through Amazon, Ebay, & Sam's Club, it would appear the entire set may be worth about $50-$60 (US).

Since you are looking for specific brands, Cuisinart knives brand new would be comparable. Calphalon makes a line of knives that are comparable as are certain models made by Zwilling J.A. Henckels.

While these knives do not have wood handles, they are in the same range price wise.

I hope this helps.

Good luck! :)
 
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What is the fight about? What did they sell for new? What would that be in today's dollars?
I found a bunch for sale on Ebay. You might find yours there if the thief is selling them.
The problem is I don't know what I paid for them originally - it was 30 years ago! But I bought them at Macys, and remember they seemed super expensive at the time. Insurance is supposed to replace with NEW, not used.
 
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Since knives do not appear to be collectible or unique in any way, "comparables" could any knives of similar cost sold at any store like Target etc. From the offerings that I have seen online through Amazon, Ebay, & Sam's Club, it would appear the entire set may be worth about $50-$60 (US).

That's true for actual cash value, but not replacement value. For replacements, they have to pay for something new and equivalent quality. Since I originally bought them at Macys, Target and Sam's Club are definitely not the same quality. I'll look into the other brands you mentioned, thanks.
 
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I'm not sure the insurance company is going to agree with you on this. Any claim that I have ever made (which are few) always covered the replacement cost of the items that were lost or stolen, not based on their quality. So, if I lost a $100 knife, I was written a check for for whatever it would cost me to replace that knife so long as I could prove the replacement cost was $100.

Unless there is a written appraisal that says the knives are worth "X" dollars, the insurance company is going to write you a check based on what it would cost to buy three other knives of the same make and model or other knives of similar cost.

I'm no lawyer, but, if the standard insurance practice is to replace an item with another item of "equal quality," what's to stop you from claiming say....... a $600 knife made from Tamahagane steel is the same quality as your knives??

Anyway, good luck. I hope it works out for you. :)
 
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Agree with sg, these are not expensive knives, though they likely sold for more than the typical cheap knives of the time. They are practically identical to Chicago cutlery stainless knives, a similar set of which would probably be around $50-60. It's surprising that a thief would waste the precious little time on them that they typically give themselves to get into and out of a house, so I'm guessing these were novice thieves.

These were made by the Imperial knife company, of Rhode Island and various other locations. I have an 8 or so inch slicer from their "Very Very Sharp" series. Much thinner blade than the MO series, and nicely hollow ground and polished (though still just stamped out crappy cheap 420 stainless), with stabilized rosewood handle. Again, not really what you'd call an "expensive" knife, but still costing more than the typical kitchen knife of the day of lesser fit and finish quality.
 
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Agree with sg, these are not expensive knives, though they likely sold for more than the typical cheap knives of the time. They are practically identical to Chicago cutlery stainless knives, a similar set of which would probably be around $50-60. It's surprising that a thief would waste the precious little time on them that they typically give themselves to get into and out of a house, so I'm guessing these were novice thieves.

These were made by the Imperial knife company, of Rhode Island and various other locations. I have an 8 or so inch slicer from their "Very Very Sharp" series. Much thinner blade than the MO series, and nicely hollow ground and polished (though still just stamped out crappy cheap 420 stainless), with stabilized rosewood handle. Again, not really what you'd call an "expensive" knife, but still costing more than the typical kitchen knife of the day of lesser fit and finish quality.

Actually, the thief stole my loaded U-Haul. Not sure what you mean by "stabilized handle" - my MO chef's knife, for instance, was full tang and triple riveted, and its thick blade made mincemeat out of sweet potatoes. Even the MO used prices on eBay are way more than what you're suggesting, so evidently their "very very sharp" series is very very different than the Mighty Oak.
 
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Terribly sorry for your perhaps significant loss of property there.

Some of the cheapest knives sold have thick blades, and some very thin blades command very high prices, like several hundred dollars and more, and go through potatoes and everything else like there is practically nothing there. Triple rivets are not an expensive feature to produce despite some marketing claims to the contrary, and I haven't seen where the selling prices on ebay indicate these knives are anything but what SG and myself indicated. A rather full set of MO's with original block sold for $50.

The big surge in vintage knife interest of the last few years does have many vintage knives selling for quadruple or better what they sold for 4 years ago, which is absolutely no indication of their practical value. But these you had are not Gustav Emil Ern fine carbon knives, nor vintage Forgecraft carbons which now sell for decent change, nor are they even Personna Deluxe which were made of prestige 440C stainless and sell for much more than other Vintage stainless (which typically sells cheap), they are Imperial knives which I believe are of cheap 420 stainless, and far less than stellar performance grinds. Good luck with the insurance company, perhaps you can convince them otherwise. Anyways I'm sure there are many other items stolen that would better be concentrated on.

PS Stabilized wood is wood that has been impregnated with resin giving it qualities similar to other very stable, strong and tough synthetic materials and composites. My VVS survived unscathed my SO thoughtlessly throwing it in the dishwasher quite a number of times. Used at least 10 years prior by my grandmother, it was my main knife for 27 years and though, like your MO's, no where comparable to my current knives which do command a relatively high price, it is still quite usable and completely in tact, even though having just 2 rivets.
 
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Normal untreated woods can warp. On western style handles they would separate from the metal. Then you have a gap for bacteria and rust. That's where stabilization comes in.
 
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Yup, ordinary wood can warp, split, and otherwise come to look like crap. And as far as finish stabilized woods can be simply sanded fine to restore the original finish.
 
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