Any Tips:?:Soft boiled egg --Firm whites with Runny Yolk -- Scotch Eggs

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by cook1st, Jan 29, 2016.

  1. cook1st

    cook1st

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    Hi,

    I'm doing some lemongrass scotch eggs and I was wondering if anyone out there has a technique/recipe for this? I am using AA Large eggs, right out of the fridge, I'm in DC and the kitchen is about 55 degrees Fahrenheit. 

    Right now I am using Chef John's technique which is bringing water to a boil(1/2") to steam the eggs, but with this method the submerged side is overcooked while the unsubmerged side has runny whites. 

    He tells us to cook for 6 minutes with a lid and then ice bath. Does anyone else have a better method? Perhaps, I should look at ramen books/sites and see how they make their eggs, but I want a truly runny yolk or custardy is ok with me. 

    Thanks in advance
     
  2. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    Eggs more than anything is a test of the basic skill of heat management.  I see lots of scotch eggs with hard yolk.

    If you want it foolproof then use sous vide.  See the one cooked at 145 F :  http://www.seriouseats.com/2013/10/sous-vide-101-all-about-eggs.html

    The outside whites should be cooked enough that you can crack peel and manipulate the egg. 

    My other advice is do not make your sausage layer too thick.  You want this to be something that fries fast if it has to fry too long to cook the meat, likely you will overcook the yolk.
     
  3. cook1st

    cook1st

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    Thanks, I saw this article a while back but at 145 these are the results Kenji came up with

    Here the whites are firm enough to let you cut through them and pick them up with a spoon, while the yolk remains raw. This is my favorite temperature for poached and soft-boiled eggs (details and recipes to follow).

    Loose white:  Watery and broken.
    Tight white:  Opaque white with a ghostly fringe, set enough to cut with a spoon.
    Yolk:  Ever-so-slightly thicker than raw.

    I wont be able to wrap a sausage around that. 

    I'm going to experiment with eggs today. 
     
  4. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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  5. cook1st

    cook1st

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    It took a while, but I just boil water(any amount) with handful of salt. Gently place refrigerated eggs in there, put lid on and timer for 6 min. 1 min at full blast and then reduce it to medium. Hmm, i dont think this really helps, because my medium is different than your medium, but it has worked wonderfully for me.