Any tips for cooling foods down when you don't have a blast cooler???

Discussion in 'Commercial Kitchen Rentals' started by justfeedme, Dec 11, 2017.

  1. justfeedme

    justfeedme

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    Blast coolers are out of my price range and I'm always looking for ways to cool foods down before putting them in the refrigerator for overnight storage.

    I do put an AC unit blowing on them. I pack in ice, when applicable. I put the food items in small containers.

    Any tips?
     
  2. flipflopgirl

    flipflopgirl

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    Tip....you parked your thread in the Commercial Kitchen Rentals forum.
    Move it to the pro chefs thread so it can be seen by those with the answers.
    There are also quite a few existing threads with solid advice on this topic.

    My suggestion is to pour whatever it is onto sheet pans.
    You have just increased the surface area and this allows more heat to disperse faster.
    I also keep a couple of quart containers (not quite full of water to allow for expansion) parked in the freezer for huge vats of soups/stocks and that works great as well...just plunge into said vat and let it happen.
    The second tip I got from an archive thread here on CT.
    :cool:

    mimi
     
  3. chefwriter

    chefwriter

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    Depends on what you're cooling and what form it is in. Stews and the like in two inch deep hotel pans. Like mimi said, sheet pans and frozen containers for other items and big liquids.
    When cooking some things, I've measured how much water needs to be added to make the final product, measured out the water in weight, and then added that much in ice. For example, a bean soup. Make the soup with as little water as possible, knowing you want two gallons at the end. You find you have one gallon of mix. Water weighs 8 pounds per gallon. Add 8 pounds of ice and you're soup is finished and cold. This is a bit tricky of course depending on what recipe you are making but it can be a big help.
     
  4. flipflopgirl

    flipflopgirl

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    Great tip that I just may use today...making split pea soup for Christmas Eve and will need to chill and freeze.
    Another good use of ice is to dump some in your chili to get that last bit of grease floating on top.
    The grease sticks and just dip it out.

    mimi