Any advice on how to make a thick, rich, whipped(ing) cream - like Perkins?

Discussion in 'Professional Pastry Chefs' started by treg, Mar 12, 2015.

  1. treg

    treg

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    OK, I know, Perkins... lol

    But I have to say I, and many, many, people really like the thick, rich, whipping cream they put on their strawberry pie.

    I have tried to find a "clone" recipe for it - but they just don't seem to be what I would be looking for.

    Perkins actual whipped cream ingredients:

    Whipped Cream: Cream, sugar, corn syrup, modified food starch, sodium citrate, xanthan gum, polysorbate 80, artificial flavor.

    I have been told to use unflavored gelatin, or corn starch, etc.

    Any ideas?

    Thanks!
     
  2. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    People have different tastes. I find these sorts of toppings taste and feel artificial and taste overly sweet. 

    Consider, whipped cream at home or restauarant would be just heavy cream, sugar, vanilla.

    The topping you cite has 8 ingredients. 
    • Cream  I believe labeling rules don't specify differences in cream. However, based on what else they add, I suspect this is a lower fat cream and thus cheaper, And runnier.
    • sugar This can pass without further comment
    • corn syrup  Corn syrup has become cheaper than granulated sugar. And it packs in some extra water and volume compared to sugar. 
    • modified food starch  This can be many things, but is probably here for structure. The corn syrup thinned out lower fat cream will not whip or hold well compared to heavy cream. 
    • sodium citrate this is an emulsifier to help hold what fat there is in suspension among the extra water. In effect, this helps the cream whip and stay whipped. it's also sour so they probably add extra corn syrup to balance it--corn syrup being cheap again. 
    • xanthan gum  Again, a texture ingredient
    • polysorbate80  I think this is a preservative just from memory.
    • artificial flavor  If they had used real vanilla, I think they'd have chosen to list it. BUt they may also include some other things to make up for the water and filler content of this mix.
    So what does all this mean? Perkins makes this topping to save money compared to real whipped cream both in ingredients and the time it takes to make the whipped cream in store as needed. This topping is both lower fat and higher water content via artificial additives. Weigh that how you will. 

    Gelatin and corn starch are tricks to help stabilize whipped cream so it stays whipped longer. They won't help you emulsify the corn syrup and cream particularly, nor will they add the texture boost the artificial ingredients did. 

    Whip your own cream, preferably heavy cream, not just whipping cream. It's simple, it's fast and you're in control of what you eat. And on the level of the individual consumer, will be cheaper than trying to recreate commercial topping. A lone consumer lacks the economies of scale to make it pay off, and I personally think it's superior to manufactured topping. 
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2015
  3. chefpeon

    chefpeon Kitchen Dork

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    I agree with all phatch has said, above. But I know what you mean about people asking for that stuff. As much as we purists try to stay away from that artificiality, people just like it.....so you grit your teeth and do what you can. I prefer to use stabilized whipped cream (adding gelatin to heavy cream and sugar) myself, but have, in my career, used the "Perkins" stuff. I'm pretty sure what you're referring to is this stuff: http://www.richsisb.com/product-thumbnail/BETTERCREME-WHIPPED-ICING-LIQUID/1556.html

    The pros:

    Room temperature stable

    Whips up nice

    Great spreadability

    Convenient

    People like it

    The cons:

    It's full of artificial crap that any self respecting pastry chef would prefer not to use. 

    But it's a weird world, and we're always toeing the line between being artisans and businesspeople. Sometimes you just gotta give 'em what they want.

    Hope this helps.....

    Cheers......Annie
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2015
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  4. flipflopgirl

    flipflopgirl

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    X3

    Have to admit it has a rabid following in certain circles.
    No need to make it yourself as have read on the cake forums it is available for public purchase at the big box store bakeries.
    By the tub.
    They use it on those huge sheet cakes with the primary color accents.

    mimi

    Disclaimer: I hold no personal grudge against primary colors.
    They have their place among children's toys and books (and the occasional throw pillow).
    Just hard to see someone smile after eating mouthful of brite blue paste colored "icing".
    Or yellow.
    Just IMO.

    m
     
  5. jellly

    jellly

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    One more option - I love to use mascarpone in my whipped cream.  It gives it a much heavier, richer mouth feel without the artificial ingredients.  It might not be exactly what you are looking for, but someone else may want to sample.  It holds so well, that you can add a generous amount of alcohol if you are so inclined and is quite decadent.
     
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  6. chefpeon

    chefpeon Kitchen Dork

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    Love that idea, Jellly! I'm going to try it. What's your ratio generally? At what point do you incorporate it into the cream during the whipping process?
     
  7. flipflopgirl

    flipflopgirl

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    Yes please!

    mimi
     
  8. jellly

    jellly

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    900g  Mascarpone

    392g    10x

    1125g Cream

    1/4c    Marsala

    The above recipe is what I used for a quick tiramisu-style filling.  I whip the mascarpone with the 10x first, then stream in the cream and marsala and take to stiff peaks.  I was given this recipe years ago and since have used it in many variations for shortcakes and crepe filling.  I have added chestnut puree with rum for a pavlova and roasted kabocha puree and gelatin for a mousse filling with candied pecans.

    I love working with mascarpone so much that it ends up in many of my desserts.  Try it whipped with Nutella....mmmm.
     
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  9. flipflopgirl

    flipflopgirl

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    Last edited: Mar 17, 2015
  10. chefpeon

    chefpeon Kitchen Dork

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    Besides Marsala? Well.....there's the old standby....Grand Marnier......or Amaretto.....or Kahlua.....or Chambord......or Creme de Menthe.....or or or! Anything goes! Woo hoo!/img/vbsmilies/smilies/crazy.gif
     
  11. lauren1992

    lauren1992

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    Have you not tried whipping cream and double cream together.
    Equal quantities it whips beautifully ands holds very well.
     
  12. flipflopgirl

    flipflopgirl

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    But which one would complement a deep dark almost bittersweet chocolate and not snatch all the glory?
    I thought of Chambord but maybe a disconnect....
    Altho if I add a bit of cooled melted chocolate in with the mascarpone then the liqueur ( not enuf chocolate to take the dish to one note city) it may just work!

    Thanks GF.

    mimi

    @Jellly don't worry I will certainly follow your recipe to the T before starting down that path of evil twisting lol.
    Picked up some berries ( yes imported but sooo sweet....my bad) this afternoon and have them macerating as we "speak".
    Starting the cream now....using a bit of Kirsch that was lost in the refer drawer.

    m
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2015
  13. sonatina2001

    sonatina2001

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    If you're just looking to quickly stabilize whipped cream, add in non-fat dry milk at a ratio of about 1/4 c to each full cup of liquid cream, then whip to stiff peak.  It won't be quite as thick as the fake stuff you are talking about but it's handy in a pinch.
     
  14. chefpeon

    chefpeon Kitchen Dork

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    Lauren1992......here in the US, or at least my part of it.......double cream IS whipping cream......

    so I'm guessing what you are saying is it would be the US equivalent of whipping half and half and heavy cream together.....which would actually be worse.....at least where I live...../img/vbsmilies/smilies/lol.gif
     
  15. sonatina2001

    sonatina2001

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    I would add creme de cacao.  Although if you could hunt down the elusive Mozart Chocolate Liqueur, that would be even better.  They even have a white chocolate version which would balance out the dark chocolate, IMO (although I favor dark chocolate).
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2015
  16. treg

    treg

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    I guess my post wasn't that clear, lol.

    The stuff Perkin's uses on its Strawberry Pie is not "fake" - like the Rich's stuff.

    It is made with real cream, etc. - and tastes quite good.

    It is thick, holds it's shape, and has a very nice ivory (not white) color.

    It appears that they put it on the pie with a pastry/piping bag.

    Some suggested adding instant vanilla pudding?

    Adding clear gelatin?

    Adding cornstarch?
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2015
  17. chefpeon

    chefpeon Kitchen Dork

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    Did you read the whole thread, TREG? There are some suggestions regarding using gelatin and mascarpone to recreate the "cream" you are speaking of. We use the term "fake" because although it is actual cream, it has a lot of additives that pastry chefs don't normally use. So in this case, the term "fake" is misleading. If our above suggestions aren't suitable, I Googled "stabilized whipped cream" for you: http://www.wikihow.com/Stabilize-Whipped-Cream
     
  18. treg

    treg

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    Hi and thanks for the replies - they are VERY much appreciated!

    However, I am not really looking for a "stabilized" whipped cream - I am looking for a whipped cream similar to the one that is used on Baker's Square/Perkin's pies.

    I found this - does this make any sense?

    Perkin’s-like whipped cream topping

    Topping Ingredients:

    ½ cup heavy whipping cream
    ¼ cup granulated sugar
    1 tsp. vanilla

    2.5 tbsp. flour
    ½ cup milk
    ½ tsp. vanilla
    ½ cup butter (1 stick)
    ½ cup granulated sugar

    Topping Preparation Instructions:

    In your stand mixer whisk whipping cream, ¼ cup sugar and 1 tsp. vanilla until stiff peaks form. You can use this to top the pie, or you can continue on to make a heavier duty frosting that is similar to the Baker’s Square/Perkin’s pie topping.

    In a small saucepan whisk flour into milk and heat, stirring constantly, until it thickens to a cupcake batter consistency. This happens quicker than you think, so don’t let it burn! Remove from heat and cool to room temperature.

    Stir in vanilla.

    While mixture is cooling cream butter and sugar until fluffy then add COOLED milk/flour/vanilla mixture and beat until it resembles whipped cream. Add whipped cream to this mixture and beat to combine until fluffy. If the mixture curdles take about ¼ of the mixture and warm it in the microwave, then slowly stream it back into the mixture while beating on high until it comes back together.

    Using a pastry bag and 1M tip decorate the pie to your liking.
     
  19. flipflopgirl

    flipflopgirl

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    Not only makes sense but looks pretty tasty.
    I am seeing more and more flour based butter creams on blogs and Pinterest.
    Have Gma Van's recipe around here someplace plus Grand the youngest is turning 1 next week.
    May just use yours and see if it plays out.

    mimi

    You cannot call yourself a baker without mastering the 1M swirl ;-)
     
  20. treg

    treg

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    Please do and let us know how it turns out for you!

    :)