Another Sugar question

Discussion in 'Professional Pastry Chefs' started by panini, Jan 7, 2006.

  1. panini

    panini

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    Need an idea.
    I have a wedd. cake coming up this week with a bunch of sugar on it. I designed a silhouette of a bride and groom that I am going to pour.
    I will be pouring the same colors as the flowers only clear or maybe alcohol.
    I want to use two colors for each figure. I don't want definate edges where the two meet. More of a blend.
    I need ideas on some sort of dam, so after pouring one color, I can pour the second while still hot enough to mix. I'm going real light on the colors.
    If anybody understands this, I could use some ideas. Chrose?CR?
    pan
    The poured piece will be the topper
     
  2. m brown

    m brown

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    pannini,
    try an oiled piece of tinfoil curved to desired shape as high as the edges of your templet with a little wiggle room so you can pull it up and out of the way when the two hot liquid sugars meet. then you can swirl the two with a bamboo skewer if desired.
    you can also try a piece of copper or thin tin/sheet metal well oiled to keep the shape. If running under the metal is a fear, use putty to hold and keep from underrunning.
    best!:bounce:
     
  3. cakerookie

    cakerookie

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    Hi Pan;
    Do you have a mold already made? You could use a piece of metal strapping like they use for shipping to hold boxes on. Just form it to fit between the two figures. Allow your first pour to harden slightly before pouring your second figure, then you can quickly remove it and the figures should meld together nicely. Does this help any? Is it what you were looking for?
     
  4. m brown

    m brown

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    pour both at the same time with dam in place so you can blurr the line once the metal is pulled out.
    You could even use a thin strip of silpat for the dam.
    send pic's once it's done
     
  5. panini

    panini

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    That it!
    Thank you both very much! Just couldn't get the brain working. I had thoughts of the dam with metal and such, but was hesitant about putting the oil down.
    A strip of silpat will be great.
    In fact, I don't know if anyone has received a sample of a new one from Germany, solid brown and about half the price. That little sample will come in handy.
    I was thinking of pouring together, but I have only one funnel. I'm rolling pretty thin(#3 rolling bar). So the pour will go a little tooo fast for one of my co-workers to pour at the same time. I had a vision of me pouring with a funnel in one hand and the pot in the other:confused: the vision then turned to sugar pouring over the clay, off the marble, and on to my legs:eek:
     
  6. cakerookie

    cakerookie

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    Good Luck Pan. Let me know how it turns out. CR. Hey getting a little bored with sugar know of any thing else I might be able to try my hand at for a while? Not going to quit sugar work no way just try a new avenue. Got any ideas?
     
  7. momoreg

    momoreg

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    Cool idea. I'd love to see pics once it's done. What do you mean by alcohol?
     
  8. jessiquina

    jessiquina

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    i am more visual, so i didnt exactly know what you were doing, so i would also like to see pics ;)
     
  9. chrose

    chrose

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    I was going to say all those things, but I got to the thread after the party was over;)
     
  10. panini

    panini

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    Momo,
    I don't know the technical name. Ya know,The poured bubbly stuff. Rubbing alcohol on the parchment, then pouring a strip of sugar and lifting. As it starts to run the alcohol will form bubbles in the sugar. I know you know this, but a shot explanation anyway. Of course there may be a better way to do it.
    pan
     
  11. cakerookie

    cakerookie

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    Pan you must be talking about Bubble Sugar where you use some type of alcohol spirit such as vodka,tequila or gin a clear spirit. You can use denatured alcohol if they will not be consumed. Is this what you are talking about? If it is, let me know I have a recipe for isomalt and granulated sugar,also a how to on both.
     
  12. momoreg

    momoreg

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    Yes, pan, thanks for clarifying.

    I've used bubble paper years ago, but never that technique.

    Much more economical.
     
  13. panini

    panini

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    I must be using the wrong terminology. Then again, I'm from the way old school.
    CR, I would like to see recipes.
    I always tell my customers the bubble sugar is not edible.
    I've always just rubbed down some parchment paper with rubbing alcohol. Pour a 3-5" strip of sugar, then lift the parchment up and let the sugar run down. It forms bubbles in the sugar.
    Is this what ya'll are talkin about? I hadn't seen in for a while and then over the last couple of years I've seen it back as plate garnishes and such.
    If there is an easier way, I would love to know.
    My ways are probably antiquated, like boiling sugar in a stock pot, pouring in royal icing and quickly throwing a stack of sheetpans on top to make rock.:eek:
     
  14. jessiquina

    jessiquina

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    we have been using isomalt to make bubble sugar. you sandwich it between two silpats and bake it.
     
  15. momoreg

    momoreg

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    Pan, I make rock that way, but why the sheetpans.

    Jess, I've seen that method but never tried it. Seems so simple!
     
  16. momoreg

    momoreg

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    I received the bubble paper as a sample years ago (I think from Qzina), and it's treated parchment (with what, I don't know), and it was about 50 cents a sheet. You can reuse it, but to me that's still pretty pricey.
     
  17. panini

    panini

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    Momo,
    We were doing so many pieces back then, we needed a lot. Never measured back then and many times we would have the 'Lucy Washing Machine' without the pans. It also made it denser.
    In fact, I just saw my old sugar buddie from back then on Sugar Rush. Now in Washington w/same company.

    Ok, tell me exactly how to do the bubble in the silpat. Do you put small amounts for small pieces?
     
  18. jessiquina

    jessiquina

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    you pour the isomalt (a cup or so to start out) on the first silpat(on a sheet pan of course) and put some dollops of random food colors (whatever you wish) and put the other silpat on top. bake, how long? i dunno. i've seen it done but never was left alone to do it.

    ****for the coloring, you can put some isomalt in a ziplock and the color you want and shake it up. that will color the entire piece of baked sugar.

    and then when its cooled, you can just break it to the size you want.
     
  19. cakerookie

    cakerookie

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    Pan the process is simple. Just make a regular batch of boiled sugar has much as you think you will need, Paint the silpat or parchment with a clear spirit such as vodgka, gin or something then pour the hot sugar in thin strips. Lift the silpat or parchment up by the corners on the sugar end and shake lightly.This forces the sugar down and you need to have a silpat or parchment to catch the run off. Then when it cools you just peel it off. You can leave the sugar on the parchment for storage with silca gel or something.Peel it off the silpat before you store it. Nothing hard about this. I posted something last night but my internet connection went out just as I hit submit reply. Got any questions? You can eat it if you use gin or vodkga or something like that.
     
  20. panini

    panini

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    Thanks all.
    I will try all the methods tonight.
    Change on the topper. The bride would like an Art Deco style dress. So I'm probably back to one color for her,