anglaise-based choc mousse

Discussion in 'Professional Pastry Chefs' started by thebighat, Jun 21, 2003.

  1. thebighat

    thebighat

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    Went to a demo by a Valronha rep and she mentioned that their mousse recipes, which she promised to forward and didn't, are anglaise-based, rather than a sabayon kind of thing. Anybody ever try this? I have been making a ganache the day before I need to make mousse to lessen the chances of chocolate chips. I may give this a whirl and see what happens.
     
  2. momoreg

    momoreg

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    Interesting concept. I used to work with a guy who made a quick mousse with pastry cream and whipped cream.
     
  3. w.debord

    w.debord

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    It's late and I'm tired........but I think that's how Gisslens mousses are made. I've made mousse recipes out of my French books that start as anglaise, many of them do.

    I don't know, it's not what most of us think of as mousse (white and whip cream in chocolate), or should I say what we grew up learning as mousse. They need gelatin to set, don't have any whites and are firmer/creamier vs light. They do freeze beautifully, but I really do think of them as bavarians.
     
  4. angrychef

    angrychef

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    Anglaised based mousses I call bavarian creams. I guess a good ratio would be 1/2 anglaise to 1/2 whipped cream to get a lighter consistency. You do have to add quite a bit of gelatin since the base is more fluid.
     
  5. isa

    isa

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    The way you phrase your text Im not sure if you are looking for a recipe or just impression on the method.
     
  6. thebighat

    thebighat

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    Half pastry cream and half whipped cream is a diplomat cream. That can be used with or without gelatin depending on what it's in. I was wondering about specifically chocolate mousse with an angalise base, and probably some meringue folded in to lighten it. Apparently the Valrhona people feel you get less of an eggy taste when using an anglaise than you would when making a sabayon base. I'll have to think about this.
     
  7. pastrychef_den

    pastrychef_den

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    Hi!

    I also went to a Valrhona seminar, a few years back, conducted by Sylvain Leroy. It was interesting.

    Anglaise-based mousses are Bavarians which uses gelatin. Pastry cream based mousses are ususally categorized as Chiboust which most of the time doesn't add gelatin, in some cases, a littel gelatin is used.

    Did a lot of both when I worked with Chef En-Ming Hsu, a few years back, at the Ritz Carlton Chicago. Did some desserts that used those for the Dining Room.

    Hope this helps.

    pastry
     
  8. pastrychef_den

    pastrychef_den

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    I mean little...
     
  9. pjm333

    pjm333

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    thebighat
    Im not sure if this is what you want, but I make this at work instead of making a bavarian from scratch...also have recipes for the diplomat and chiboust..

    20 oz hot anglaise
    2 1/4 # semi or milk choc
    8 gelatin soaked & drained
    2 # cream - stiff peak
    Add choc and gelatin to anglaise and mix well and cool to room temp and fold in cream.

    Diplomat
    4 1/2 # pastry cream - room temp and beaten smooth
    2 qts cream - beat w/ 10X to soft peak
    14 oz 10X
    24 gelatin soaked, drained and melted
    1 # melted semi choc - optional
    Add gelatin and choc if using to pastry cream and fold in cream.. We use this for a fraiser at work..make i full sheet with the metal frame.

    chiboust
    1 pt milk
    2 T sugar
    6 oz egg yolks
    2 T sugar
    3 T cornstarch
    8 oz egg whites
    13 oz water / 4 oz water
    6 gelatin soaked and drained
    Boil milk & sugar, mix sugar ,starch and yolks and temper milk and bring mix to boil and strain and cool to room temp. Bring sugar and water to 240 degrees while beating whites to stiff peak..add sugar to whites and beat stiff and shinny. Add whited to pastry cream mix..

    choc-4 oz choc + 2 T rum
    coffee- 2 T coffee + 2 T kahlua
    praline- 2 1/2 oz praline + 2 T rum
    Or you can replace the milk with OJ etc..
    I will try to attach some pictures
    1, anglaise mousse
    2, diplomat
    3. pumpkin chiboust
     
  10. pjm333

    pjm333

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    one more time
     
  11. thebighat

    thebighat

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    pjm33--that's pretty much what I was hoping for. Thanks. Now I have to transpose some of them using fruit puree and agar.