anchovies

26
10
Joined Jan 4, 2002
I recently opened a can of salt packed anchovies for a recipe. I only used a few of them. Now I've got all these salty little fish leftover. How should I store them to use in the future or am I doomed to waste these tasty little guys?
 
26
10
Joined Jan 4, 2002
Thank you for your reply Mr. Bond. I presume that after covering with oil they should be shakened and not stirred:) But, seriously, would you store them salt crystals and all covered in oil?
 
1,389
13
Joined Jul 24, 2001
Hello homechef777 and welcome.

This is my suggestion.
Remove the salt with water. Some people soak them in water for a couple of hours just to remove the extra salty taste, but I do no think that yours are that salty.
Then split them and remove the bone.
Then place them in OLIVE oil .
Another interesting way is to roll half an anchovie around a capper ;)

Tell me please. Have you ever tasted fresh anchovies?
 
4,508
32
Joined Jul 31, 2000
Since they are in salt it is not nessarsary to oil them (sorry James)

The salt will keep them for a couple of months, When I have a couple minutes I will give you some ideas to utilize them
cc
 
4,508
32
Joined Jul 31, 2000
Athenaeus, I think we were posting at the same time :)

I think the anchovies in question are already fillet, The practice of soaking and then putting olive oil over them is fine, I would do that as you use them. Once the tin is opened and exposed to air it will start to detereate, The salted kind have a longer shelf life to the cure. How about slicing a boule and rubbing the slices with garlic and olive oil, Put them on the grill and top with anchovies, kalamata olives, dry feta and preserved lemon . Run this under the broiler to warm and have it with some greens and a sancerre
cc
 
1,389
13
Joined Jul 24, 2001
It happens really often when it comes to meditterannean cooking(posting together) :)

Great tip

We do something else with fresh anchovies.

We removed the head-yes! anchovies actually have one- and we place them in strong vinegar for 4 -6 hours.
Vinegars "bakes " them. Then you remove the bone and you can keep them in olive oil for months.
It's a kind of pickled anchovies, served great with pink peper ;)

But the best of all is barbecued anchovies. But in order to have a success you need a Greek Beach :)
You reach perfection if you eat them on barbecued bread with a barbecued slice of tomato.

Both recipes above are Portuguese .In Portugal they are very serious when it comes to anchovies
 
26
10
Joined Jan 4, 2002
Athenaeus,

Thank you for taking time out from sailing the wine dark seas to offer your serving suggestions. Unfortunately, I'm land-locked and fresh anchovies are not available. I'm in need of other recipes to use up my finny morsels that come in a tin.
 
1,389
13
Joined Jul 24, 2001
You are welcome homechef777.
The threads are read by many people, so we usually take the chance to discuss a subject thoroughly.

Cape Chef, I am sure you have many more recipes.
What about anchovies rolled in grape leaves and barbecued?

I wonder cape chef if you have a good recipe for anchovy paste. As you know in antiquity especially in the Roman Era anchovy was the main ingredient for making garum which was a sauce that was used practically in every dish of Roman Cuisine.
The same way soya sauce is used in chinese kitchen.

Do you have such a recipe? I have found once one with capers. I mean mixing capers and anchovies together, but I lost it.

I change this with the latest findings of the food historians about this mysterious ingredient-garum. I know you love those stories :)

I also hope that Rachel sees this thread and posts some recipes from her Spaniard experience.
 
26
10
Joined Jan 4, 2002
Just to add to your discussion of garum Athenaeus. I'm presently reading a book by Mark Kurlansky "Salt: a World History" which speaks about garum as a salty condiment in the early chapters of his book. It sounds very similar to me like the southeast Asian nam pla or nuoc mam(?) which is also made from fermented and salted fish. Having used it, I can say that it adds a great depth of flavor to food much as the anchovies do when melted into olive oil in Mediterrenean cuisine.
 
1,389
13
Joined Jul 24, 2001
Thank you homechef777

I have read this book too, yes garum is like nuoc mam. I have tasted in many ancient recipes I have prepared.
Garus is always present in ancient recipes. Although ancient Greeks knew garus ( Athenaeus mentions it many times) it seems that after the Re Coquinaria of Apicius, garus , became a must!

Cindy Renfrow has posted in Chef Talk Net about salt
In Arcaeology salt is connected with various problems and questions that still need to be answered.

It's an exciting topic.




Cindy's Renfrow article in Chef Talk
 
4,508
32
Joined Jul 31, 2000
777, yes you are correct to assume these similarities.
Garam was made bye fermenting fish, as the SE asian fish sauces do
From the numerouse allusions to garam by classical authers,and in particular the descritions givin to it by Pliny (1st century ad) and the geoponica (10th century ad)
It was obvious that there were many ways to produce garam, sometimes the entrail of large fish were used,some times small fish and sometimes whole fish
such small fish fell into the 'atherina"family Like smelt. which abounds in the mediterranean and black bass,anchovies or small grey mullet or sea bream. the larger fish ranged down from Tuna to mackerel.
The liquid that was drawn off the salted fish after fermenting for a couple monthes is Garam
 

Latest posts

Top Bottom