Anchovies - general questions

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by kjbnyc, Mar 17, 2017.

  1. kjbnyc

    kjbnyc

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    I purchased Agostino Recca in a jar.  These are considered cured with salt, is that correct?  If so, does cured mean they are no longer raw?

    Using a double boiler, I did a saute of one anchovy with some olive oil, butter, and minced onions.  It was the first time I had tasted anchovies and found it to have a bite at the end that I didn't care for.  

    Do all anchovies have that bite?  Or do the more expensive brands and/or salt pack anchovies have a milder finish?  
     
  2. kjbnyc

    kjbnyc

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    One other question - for the filets I don't use, can they be frozen for future use or will that disrupt the quality?
     
  3. mike9

    mike9

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    Right they are no longer raw.  The "bite" might be the brine it's definitely not the fillet itself.  I do't know how big a jar you bought, but you can top it off with oil and they will last a while in the fridge.  They would probably deteriorate in the freezer.  Hell I'll eat them on good baguette with good butter any day - they don't last long around my house.
     
  4. butzy

    butzy

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    I know you didn't ask, but they are great on pizza /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif
     
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  5. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    That's actually, probably my least favorite way of eating them.  I like them in salads, on "antipasto" platters and right out of the can or jar.  Mostly I prefer them cold or room temperature.  There are a few warm applications that I like them in, but mostly in uncooked applications.  They can also be a great flavor enhancer like fish sauce in Thai and Vietnamese cuisine.  Just a little, minced into a fine paste and stirred into whatever you are cooking.  It dissolves completely and you can't taste it but it adds a depth of flavor (umami) that can round out a dish.
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2017
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  6. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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