"an edge in the kitchen" or "mastering knife skills", which one do you prefer?

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by butzy, Dec 26, 2010.

  1. butzy

    butzy

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    Not sure if this thread should be here or in the cook book section, but I figure it is more knifey than cookie /img/vbsmilies/smilies/lol.gif

    I got enough money to just buy one book about knives.

    Should I go for Chad Ward: An edge in the kitchen or Norman Weinstein's Mastering knife skills?

    Or is there another one that is better and I haven't thought of?

    I spend more money on knives than intended, so got not much left...... /img/vbsmilies/smilies/crying.gif
     
  2. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Weinstein is a wonderful teacher, but very old school, and very "my way or the highway."  He's also a little too German profile and too "tip down" for my tastes.  Your knives (Global, Fujiwara) are French profile and not ideal for you to copy him exactly.  There are a lot of different, equally valid styles -- but you could do a lot worse than learn to learn and adapt skills from Weinstein. 

    If you want to know all about knives, sharpening and kit as well as knife skills, go with the Ward book, it's excellent.  But again, be aware that there a lots of equally good ways to skin any number of cats -- and Ward doesn't have a monopoly on them any more than Weinstein does. 

    A very high percentage of knife use is really just using a very sharp knife which is well enough designed for the task so it doesn't fight you.  Still, the whole pinch grip / claw / cut and retreat thing will make your life much easier -- and while it isn't the only way to chop, it's relatively easy to learn and very efficient.   

    Read Getting a Grip, and Guillotine and Glide, also check my blog every month or so for knife skill additions.  

    BDL 
     
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2010
  3. butzy

    butzy

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    Thanks BDL,

    Been reading a lot on your website and of course on this forum.

    Started sharpening with an old stone (no idea about make and grit) and improving step by step.

    Just taking the plunge actually seems to be the answer!

    For now I'm following the same method as shown on chefsknivestogo.

    Never thought of changing hands while sharpening, but as I'm not strictly right handed, it seems to work for me!