American measurement TO metric one please ?

5
10
Joined Jul 20, 2011
Hi every one , can any one please tell what is the equivalent of cup  of flour in grams please ? i do find much easier to use the meteric measurement in baking since the american one is bit confusing ( sorry guys)
 
3,401
162
Joined Sep 18, 2008
Hi every one , can any one please tell what is the equivalent of cup  of flour in grams please ? i do find much easier to use the meteric measurement in baking since the american one is bit confusing ( sorry guys)
A word of caution: a "cup of flour" is a volume measurement, the equivalent weight WILL vary depending on
  • sifting
  • packing
  • humidity
  • leveling
  • variety
  • fineness
and may vary from a low of 4 1/2 ounces (125 grams) to somewhere around5 1/2-6 ounces (156-170 grams).

According to King Arthur Flour, 4 1/2 ounces is fairly representative for all-purpose flour in the USA.

The ONLY accurate volume/weight conversions are for liquids, any granular material is subject to considerable variation. Best solution? Get a "1 cup measure", fill it with flour, and weigh it on a scale calibrated in grams.
 
5,192
295
Joined Jul 28, 2001
Never mind,

Chef Pete said all I was writing. The only thing I added was that there is less room for era with small recipes.

You can run into real problems scaling up. If you are off a measure on a small recipe it is only exaggerated as you multiply up.
 
Last edited:
3,401
162
Joined Sep 18, 2008
[table][tr][td]
Common ingredient weights
[/td][td]1.000[/td][td]28.34952[/td][/tr][tr][td]Item[/td][td]Measurement[/td][td]Ounces[/td][td]Grams[/td][/tr][tr][td]Almond flour, toasted[/td][td]1 cup[/td][td]3.325[/td][td]95[/td][/tr][tr][td]Amaranth flour[/td][td]1 cup[/td][td]3.625[/td][td]103[/td][/tr][tr][td]Ancient Grains Blend[/td][td]1 cup[/td][td]4.625[/td][td]132[/td][/tr][tr][td]Barley flour[/td][td]1 cup[/td][td]4.000[/td][td]114[/td][/tr][tr][td]Buckwheat flour[/td][td]1 cup[/td][td]4.250[/td][td]121[/td][/tr][tr][td]Chickpea flour[/td][td]1 cup[/td][td]3.000[/td][td]86[/td][/tr][tr][td]Flax flour[/td][td]½ cup[/td][td]1.750[/td][td]50[/td][/tr][tr][td]Harvest Grains Blend[/td][td]½ cup[/td][td]2.625[/td][td]75[/td][/tr][tr][td]Hazelnut flour[/td][td]1 cup[/td][td]3.125[/td][td]89[/td][/tr][tr][td]King Arthur flours[/td][td] [/td][td] [/td][td] [/td][/tr][tr][td]- Unbleached All-Purpose Flour[/td][td]1 cup[/td][td]4.250[/td][td]121[/td][/tr][tr][td]- Bread flour[/td][td]1 cup[/td][td]4.250[/td][td]121[/td][/tr][tr][td]- Cake flour[/td][td]1 cup[/td][td]4.000[/td][td]114[/td][/tr][tr][td]- Unbleached Cake Flour blend[/td][td]1 cup[/td][td]4.250[/td][td]121[/td][/tr][tr][td]- Gluten-Free multi-purpose[/td][td]1 cup[/td][td]5.375[/td][td]153[/td][/tr][tr][td]- Perfect Pastry Blend[/td][td]1 cup[/td][td]4.000[/td][td]114[/td][/tr][tr][td]- Rice Flour, Brown[/td][td]1 cup[/td][td]5.375[/td][td]153[/td][/tr][tr][td]- Rice Flour, White[/td][td]1 cup[/td][td]5.000[/td][td]142[/td][/tr][tr][td]- Round Table Pastry flour (white)[/td][td]1 cup[/td][td]3.750[/td][td]107[/td][/tr][tr][td]- Tapioca Flour/starch [/td][td]1 cup[/td][td]4.000[/td][td]114[/td][/tr][tr][td]- Whole wheat (traditional)[/td][td]1 cup[/td][td]4.000[/td][td]114[/td][/tr][tr][td]- Whole wheat (white)[/td][td]1 cup[/td][td]4.000[/td][td]114[/td][/tr][tr][td]- Whole wheat pastry[/td][td]1 cup[/td][td]3.375[/td][td]96[/td][/tr][tr][td]Oat flour[/td][td]1 cup[/td][td]3.250[/td][td]93[/td][/tr][tr][td]Rye flours[/td][td] [/td][td] [/td][/tr][tr][td]Medium Rye[/td][td]1 cup[/td][td]3.625[/td][td]103[/td][/tr][tr][td]Pumpernickel[/td][td]1 cup[/td][td]3.750[/td][td]107[/td][/tr][tr][td]White Rye[/td][td]1 cup[/td][td]3.750[/td][td]107[/td][/tr][tr][td]Semolina[/td][td]1 cup[/td][td]5.750[/td][td]164[/td][/tr][tr][td]Sorghum flour[/td][td]1 cup[/td][td]4.875[/td][td]139[/td][/tr][tr][td]Spelt flour[/td][td]1 cup[/td][td]3.500[/td][td]100[/td][/tr][tr][td]Sugar, granulated white[/td][td]1 cup[/td][td]7.000[/td][td]199[/td][/tr][tr][td]"[/td][td][sup]2[/sup]⁄[sub]3[/sub] cup[/td][td]4.750[/td][td]135[/td][/tr][tr][td]Sugar, confectioners’, unsifted[/td][td]2 cups[/td][td]8.000[/td][td]227[/td][/tr][tr][td]Sugar, dark or light brown, packed[/td][td]1 cup[/td][td]7.500[/td][td]213[/td][/tr][tr][td]Sugar, demerara[/td][td]1 cup[/td][td]7.750[/td][td]220[/td][/tr][tr][td]Sugar, Sticky Bun[/td][td]1 cup[/td][td]3.500[/td][td]100[/td][/tr][tr][td]Sugar substitute: Splenda[/td][td]1 cup[/td][td]0.875[/td][td]25[/td][/tr][tr][td]Sugar substitute: Clabber Girl Sugar replacer for baking[/td][td]1 cup[/td][td]5.000[/td][td]142[/td][/tr][tr][td]Tapioca flour[/td][td]1 cup[/td][td]4.000[/td][td]114[/td][/tr][tr][td]Teff flour[/td][td]1 cup[/td][td]4.750[/td][td]135[/td][/tr][/table]
Adapted from the King Arthur Website
 
5
10
Joined Jul 20, 2011
thanks guys, that wasvery helpfull, i work for manchester college ( uk) the students love cakes, i have made biscotti recently they want more of it , what is best to use is it melted butter or oil in making biscotti ?
 
6,367
128
Joined Feb 1, 2007
I slightly disagree with the idea that because flour volume varies you cannot convert it to weight.

Technically, that's true. But you have to start somewhere.

In American terms, for instance, most baking authorities use 4.5 ounces as the weight of a cup of white wheat flour. If you volume measure, will that vary? You betcha! But, in practical terms, if you use 4.5 ounces all the time you will have a consistent measurement. If a specific recipe needs adjusting, then you can always adjust. But that's true of any formula.

If the 4.5 ounce conversion consistently leads to the same problem, than adjust the base conversion. That is, for instance, if, while using 4.5 ounces, your dough consistently needs more liquid, then change your base weight to, say, 5 ounces. After that, you know that with the flour you use, if you have a volume-measurement recipe, to convert it to 5 ounces per cup.

So, in this specific case, take 4.5 ounces and convert it. There are 28.5 grams to an ounce. Multiply by 4.5 and you get 128.25 grams.

If you are off a measure on a small recipe it is only exaggerated as you multiply up.

This, too, is very true. But, maybe, more in theory than reality. In practical terms, if there is such an error, you correct after the first batch. And then there's no longer an error.

Let's not forget, too, that day-to-day differences in the flour's moisture content can have a major effect, and the dough may require more or less moisture added. I've never done big batches. But with small batches---up to six loaves of bread at a time---the day-to-day adjustments have varied more widely than any weight conversion errors.

In all cases, knowing what a good dough looks and feels like is better than blindly following any recipe or formula.
 
3,401
162
Joined Sep 18, 2008
I slightly disagree with the idea that because flour volume varies you cannot convert it to weight...
My apologies, I was simply trying to point out that the volume/weight conversion will vary with the specific product being measured as well as the technique of the person doing the measurement.

I convert volume to weight very often, especially with flours. However, I do not use any standard conversion, I use my own conversion, one that I've created from repeated trials weighing a known volume of flour in various states from "out of the bag" to fully sifted before measuring.

As KYH states, "adjust your conversion" to match conditions. Even if you measure the weight of 100 separate "cups of flour" and use the average, the next cup will probably weight more, or even less./img/vbsmilies/smilies/crazy.gif
 
 
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