Am I the only home cook to prefer a large chef's knife?

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by benuser, Mar 3, 2014.

  1. benuser

    benuser

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    A friend let me use a 29cm vintage Trompette Sabatier for
    some time before cleaning
    it up. I had used large
    blades before, but this one
    was slightly forward heavy,
    so it was much easier and
    not that fatiguing. Question
    of changing the grip.
    I bought a 270 Hiromoto,
    and it gives me the same
    impression. So much faster
    than a 240. Am I the only
    one??
     
  2. mike9

    mike9

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    I have several in the 270 range and put them in rotation a few times a year.  Hiromoto AS, a Fowler, and the two I have listed for sale.

    I had converted some 12" American carbon to Wa and those were a gas to work with.  I have the board space so why not?  Two different friends gave me huge knives last year.  A 14" Gustav Emil Ern and one with no makers mark I'll refurb them this summer.
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2014
  3. phaedrus

    phaedrus

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    I guess that 240mm is the go-to size for me.  I don't even have a 270 anymore, sold it to another guy on one of the forums.  But I do like larger knives, might pick up a Konosuke 270 down the road.
     
  4. soesje

    soesje

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    well you should just use what suits you so if you like a large one, why not :) 
     
  5. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    Absolutely! I'm a home cook, I cook nearly every day and I don't really have an absolute favorite length, maybe a bit more toward 210 mm knives. I make my choice depending on the job to do. I have 3 small Hiromotos (120, 150, 160 santoku) from which I use one or more almost daily on small stuff like chopping herbs or quickly cutting a shallot.

    I use a lot of 210 mm knives and occasionally a 240 mm for all kinds of general things. And there's also a few 270 mm, like my 270 Misono for cutting large things such as cabbage and pumpkin but also for tougher things like quince and... lobster.

    I never understand the argument of home cooks that larger knives are quicker...  /img/vbsmilies/smilies/lol.gif  what on earth kind of mountain of food needs to be cut so fast in a home surrounding?
     
  6. dillbert

    dillbert Banned

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    >>what on earth kind of mountain of food needs to be cut so fast in a home surrounding?

    amen to that.

    another big "issue" / consideration for the home scene is "And How Big is Your Cutting Board? (slash surface)"

    using a 10" / 25 cm long knife on a 8x10" cutting board doesn't work out so well.

    long knife = "some space required" and quite frequently the home cook has not invested in a mega work surface.

    good ones "of size" are not inexpensive, but considering with care it's a one-time expense, they are well worth it.

    presuming one has space is keep/store . . .

    my "main board" is 16x20" - and at times it is too small....I have to "scoop off" the "done" stuff into a bowl to make room for more "stuff yet to be done"
     
  7. ken123

    ken123

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    "I make my choice depending on the job to do."

    My largest chef's knife is a 330 mm gyuto (Tojiro). I enjoy using it for my initial processing of groceries - stacks of veggies, a row of romaine lettuce, etc etc. Then  I have a 440 mm stainlesss machete for cutting long watermelons in 1 cut.

    Some things just go better with smaller knives short gyutos, pettys, parers, etc.

    I feel the same way about large pans - pick the one that fits the task.

    ---

    Ken
     
  8. benuser

    benuser

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    What I've noticed: larger blades need less lifting, a slightly forward balance works for you, and a larger blade has a greater contact area with the board and will dull much slower.
     
  9. rick alan

    rick alan

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    I actually slice most things in-hand with a 9" slicer, wouldn't want it smaller for any reason.  Dicing onions and breaking down carrots and such is on the board of course, and I wouldn't mind having something bigger than the 240 chefs I use.  I don't think even 14" would be too big for this, especially for attacking swede.

    Rick