Am I making a Broth, Soup, or Stock?

69
20
Joined Jan 17, 2016
I've been playing around with Ramen recently, trying to figure out how to really bring out the best of the idea (granted, its instant, bwhaahha! mostly because you can't get restaurant quality dry noodles around here). What I normally do, is bring some water to a boil and add some spices and veggies; mostly Broccoli, Green/Red/Yellow peppers and pearl onions. Maybe a tiny bit of rice to thicken it up. Then let that simmer for 10 mins at low, and add a beaten, small chicken Brest. bring it back up to high and let the whole thing cook for 10mins, before bringing it down to a low (not boiling, but steaming) and cook for another 30 like that.

My Question is simple. What would this technology be called? On one hand, I seems to long to be called a soup, on the other Stock is normal cooked alot longer as well. And I think a Broth is what JUST the liquid is called (after everything have been filtered out).

Does anyone know?

I'm not a Professional Cook. I'd hesitate to even say I'm a GOOD one, Bwhahahahah! I'm just a Mad Scientist that like to experiment and figure things out. I'm sure there are some professionals out there that would call what I do just "playing around" rather than proper cooking, but its fun to see how things work and learn things on your own.

But that also means half the time, I have no idea what I am really doing is even called, or what the "proper" what of doing it is.
That being said, Its not like I don't like to climb up on the shoulders of giants once in awhile, both to get my bearings and for some inspiration.
 
2,485
492
Joined Oct 9, 2008
Stock is unseasoned (no salt) pure extraction into water.

Broth is clear soup, essentially unrefined consomme.

Your material is soup.
 
7,676
845
Joined Apr 3, 2008
You’re making soup, but not a very good soup. Broccoli doesn’t make for very good stock. Have you ever made stock? I think you should. Get a whole chicken, stick it in a pot with an onion, a couple of carrots and a few stalks of celery. Simmer for an hour covered and then remove the chicken and pick off all the meat. Put the skin and bones back into the pot and let it continue simmering for 2 hours. Meanwhile eat the luscious boiled chicken meat or save it in the fridge for later (chicken salad, chicken pot pie, enchiladas, etc)

Strain the stock and freeze it in quarts. Now you have stock for whenever you need to make a quick soup.
 
69
20
Joined Jan 17, 2016
You’re making soup, but not a very good soup. Broccoli doesn’t make for very good stock. Have you ever made stock? I think you should. Get a whole chicken, stick it in a pot with an onion, a couple of carrots and a few stalks of celery. Simmer for an hour covered and then remove the chicken and pick off all the meat. Put the skin and bones back into the pot and let it continue simmering for 2 hours. Meanwhile eat the luscious boiled chicken meat or save it in the fridge for later (chicken salad, chicken pot pie, enchiladas, etc)

Strain the stock and freeze it in quarts. Now you have stock for whenever you need to make a quick soup.
Bwhahaha! Actually, it turned out pretty good. Though I added a bit to much Vinegar.
Thanks for the tips, will try it out.
 
5,716
578
Joined Sep 5, 2008
Not really going for a "Traditional" Ramen. I don't have the materials or tools.
You don't need material or tools. Just technique. The technique you describe in your original post is pretty poor. You can develop much better flavor with just a bit of research.
 
Top Bottom